Can we have a SQL query which will basically help in viewing table and index sizes in SQl Server.

How SQL server maintains memory usage for tables/indexes?

  • You may also find the stored procedure sp_helpdb useful – Zack Burt Dec 9 '09 at 18:39
  • There are already answers to this, but I personally use the query in this link: qualityofdata.com/2011/02/02/… – naiem Jun 19 '13 at 4:50
up vote 66 down vote accepted

The exec sp_spaceused without parameter shows the summary for the whole database. The foreachtable solution generates one result set per table - which SSMS might not be able to handle if you have too many tables.

I created a script which collects the table infos via sp_spaceused and displays a summary in a single record set, sorted by size.

create table #t
(
  name nvarchar(128),
  rows varchar(50),
  reserved varchar(50),
  data varchar(50),
  index_size varchar(50),
  unused varchar(50)
)

declare @id nvarchar(128)
declare c cursor for
select '[' + sc.name + '].[' + s.name + ']' FROM sysobjects s INNER JOIN sys.schemas sc ON s.uid = sc.schema_id where s.xtype='U'

open c
fetch c into @id

while @@fetch_status = 0 begin

  insert into #t
  exec sp_spaceused @id

  fetch c into @id
end

close c
deallocate c

select * from #t
order by convert(int, substring(data, 1, len(data)-3)) desc

drop table #t
  • 4
    Your script only handles tables in the schema 'dbo'. If I have a table in my database with a schema of 'Audit', sp_spaceused needs to be called like this: exec sp_spaceused 'Audit.Data'. So script needs to be modified to feed it the table name prefaced by the schema name (separated by a dot) for it to return data about tables from other schemas. – Baodad Dec 13 '13 at 22:55
  • 1
    Good point @Boadad...that should be a super easy fix. Replacing the "select name from sysobjects where xtype='U'" with this should do the trick: "select '[' + sc.name + '].[' + s.name + ']' FROM sysobjects s INNER JOIN sys.schemas sc ON s.uid = sc.schema_id where s.xtype='U'" Great script, thanks! – DCaugs Jul 16 '15 at 13:33
  • instead of using temporary table can we insert data into other table which is not temporary? – ldevp Jul 24 '17 at 18:37

sp_spaceused gives you the size of all the indexes combined.

If you want the size of each index for a table, use one of these two queries:

SELECT
    i.name                  AS IndexName,
    SUM(s.used_page_count) * 8   AS IndexSizeKB
FROM sys.dm_db_partition_stats  AS s 
JOIN sys.indexes                AS i
ON s.[object_id] = i.[object_id] AND s.index_id = i.index_id
WHERE s.[object_id] = object_id('dbo.TableName')
GROUP BY i.name
ORDER BY i.name

SELECT
    i.name              AS IndexName,
    SUM(page_count * 8) AS IndexSizeKB
FROM sys.dm_db_index_physical_stats(
    db_id(), object_id('dbo.TableName'), NULL, NULL, 'DETAILED') AS s
JOIN sys.indexes AS i
ON s.[object_id] = i.[object_id] AND s.index_id = i.index_id
GROUP BY i.name
ORDER BY i.name

The results are usually slightly different but within 1%.

  • The first query includes primary keys, which is a little confusing for a couple reasons. – quillbreaker May 22 '13 at 14:44
  • The second query throws Msg 102, Level 15, State 1, Line 5 - Incorrect syntax near '('. at me, but I can't see any problems with the syntax. Any idea? – Oliver Jun 7 '13 at 9:31
  • Oliver, what version are you running on? It works as-is for me in 2008R2 and 2012. – Rob Garrison Jun 28 '13 at 15:49

On SQL 2012 getting this information on a table level has become deliciously simple:

SQL Management Studio -> Right click on Db -> Reports -> Standard Reports -> Disk usage by table !

Enjoy

EXEC sp_MSforeachtable @command1="EXEC sp_spaceused '?'"
  • 3
    If you post code, XML or data samples, PLEASE highlight those lines in the text editor and click on the "code samples" button ( { } ) on the editor toolbar to nicely format and syntax highlight it! – marc_s Oct 25 '11 at 16:18

Here is more compact version of the most successful answer:

create table #tbl(
  name nvarchar(128),
  rows varchar(50),
  reserved varchar(50),
  data varchar(50),
  index_size varchar(50),
  unused varchar(50)
)

exec sp_msforeachtable 'insert into #tbl exec sp_spaceused [?]'

select * from #tbl
    order by convert(int, substring(data, 1, len(data)-3)) desc

drop table #tbl

it’s being a long time since the creation for this post but I wanted to share my script:

WITH CteIndex
AS
(
SELECT 
     reservedpages = (reserved_page_count)
     ,usedpages = (used_page_count)
     ,pages = (
            CASE
                WHEN (s.index_id < 2) THEN (in_row_data_page_count + lob_used_page_count + row_overflow_used_page_count)
                ELSE lob_used_page_count + row_overflow_used_page_count
            END
            )    
     ,s.object_id   
     ,i.index_id        
     ,i.type_desc AS IndexType
     ,i.name AS indexname
    FROM sys.dm_db_partition_stats s
    INNER JOIN sys.indexes i ON s.[object_id] = i.[object_id] AND s.index_id = i.index_id   
)
SELECT DISTINCT
DB_NAME(DB_ID()) AS DatabaseName
,o.name AS TableName
,o.object_id
,ct.indexname
,ct.IndexType
,ct.index_id
, IndexSpace = LTRIM (STR ((CASE WHEN usedpages > pages THEN CASE WHEN ct.index_id < 2 THEN  pages ELSE (usedpages - pages) END ELSE 0 END) * 8, 15, 0) + ' KB')
FROM CteIndex ct
INNER JOIN sys.objects o ON o.object_id = ct.object_id
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_index_physical_stats (DB_ID(), NULL, NULL, NULL , NULL) ps ON ps.object_id = o.object_id
AND ps.index_id = ct.index_id
ORDER BY name ASC

it works for :

  • SQL Server (starting with 2008)
  • Includes info for all tables per current database
--Gets the size of each index for the specified table
DECLARE @TableName sysname = N'SomeTable';

SELECT i.name AS IndexName
      ,8 * SUM(s.used_page_count) AS IndexSizeKB
FROM sys.indexes AS i
    INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_partition_stats AS s 
        ON i.[object_id] = s.[object_id] AND i.index_id = s.index_id
WHERE s.[object_id] = OBJECT_ID(@TableName, N'U')
GROUP BY i.name
ORDER BY i.name;

SELECT i.name AS IndexName
      ,8 * SUM(a.used_pages) AS IndexSizeKB
FROM sys.indexes AS i
    INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p 
        ON i.[object_id]  = p.[object_id] AND i.index_id = p.index_id
    INNER JOIN sys.allocation_units AS a 
        ON p.partition_id = a.container_id
WHERE i.[object_id] = OBJECT_ID(@TableName, N'U')
GROUP BY i.name
ORDER BY i.name;

There is an extended stored procedure sp_spaceused that gets this information out. It's fairly convoluted to do it from the data dictionary, but This link fans out to a script that does it. This stackoverflow question has some fan-out to information on the underlying data structures that you can use to construct estimates of table and index sizes for capcity planning.

This query comes from two other answers:

Get size of all tables in database

How to find largest objects in a SQL Server database?

, but I enhanced this to be universal. It uses sys.objects dictionary:

SELECT 
    s.NAME as SCHEMA_NAME,
    t.NAME AS OBJ_NAME,
    t.type_desc as OBJ_TYPE,
    i.name as indexName,
    sum(p.rows) as RowCounts,
    sum(a.total_pages) as TotalPages, 
    sum(a.used_pages) as UsedPages, 
    sum(a.data_pages) as DataPages,
    (sum(a.total_pages) * 8) / 1024 as TotalSpaceMB, 
    (sum(a.used_pages) * 8) / 1024 as UsedSpaceMB, 
    (sum(a.data_pages) * 8) / 1024 as DataSpaceMB
FROM 
    sys.objects t
INNER JOIN
    sys.schemas s ON t.SCHEMA_ID = s.SCHEMA_ID 
INNER JOIN      
    sys.indexes i ON t.OBJECT_ID = i.object_id
INNER JOIN 
    sys.partitions p ON i.object_id = p.OBJECT_ID AND i.index_id = p.index_id
INNER JOIN 
    sys.allocation_units a ON p.partition_id = a.container_id
WHERE 
    t.NAME NOT LIKE 'dt%' AND
    i.OBJECT_ID > 255 AND   
    i.index_id <= 1
GROUP BY 
    s.NAME, t.NAME, t.type_desc, i.object_id, i.index_id, i.name 
ORDER BY
    sum(a.total_pages) DESC
;

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