42

My array is something like this:

myArray = [
  {group: "one", color: "red"}
  {group: "two", color: "blue"}
  {group: "one", color: "green"}
  {group: "one", color: "black"}
]

I want to convert this into:

myArray = [
  {group: "one", color: ["red", "green", "black"]}
  {group: "two", color: ["blue"]}
]

So, basically, group by group.

I'm trying:

for (i in myArray){
  var group = myArray[i].group;
  //myArray.push(group, {???})
}

I just don't know how to handle the grouping of similar group values.

  • Have you tried anything yet? There are many closely related questions on SO already. See this, this, and this. – p.s.w.g Jul 28 '15 at 23:12
  • Plenty of syntax errors there. Please test your code before posting. – 1983 Jul 29 '15 at 0:41

12 Answers 12

25

First, in JavaScript it's generally not a good idea to iterate over arrays using for ... in. See Why is using "for...in" with array iteration a bad idea? for details.

So you might try something like this:

var groups = {};
for (var i = 0; i < myArray.length; i++) {
  var groupName = myArray[i].group;
  if (!groups[groupName]) {
    groups[groupName] = [];
  }
  groups[groupName].push(myArray[i].color);
}
myArray = [];
for (var groupName in groups) {
  myArray.push({group: groupName, color: groups[groupName]});
}

Using the intermediary groups object here helps speed things up because it allows you to avoid nesting loops to search through the arrays. Also, because groups is an object (rather than an array) iterating over it using for ... in is appropriate.

Addendum

FWIW, if you want to avoid duplicate color entries in the resulting arrays you could add an if statement above the line groups[groupName].push(myArray[i].color); to guard against duplicates. Using jQuery it would look like this;

if (!$.inArray(myArray[i].color, groups[groupName])) {
  groups[groupName].push(myArray[i].color);
}

Without jQuery you may want to add a function that does the same thing as jQuery's inArray:

Array.prototype.contains = function(value) {
  for (var i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
    if (this[i] === value)
      return true;
  }
  return false;
}

and then use it like this:

if (!groups[groupName].contains(myArray[i].color)) {
  groups[groupName].push(myArray[i].color);
}

Note that in either case you are going to slow things down a bit due to all the extra iteration, so if you don't need to avoid duplicate color entries in the result arrays I would recommend avoiding this extra code. There

  • 1
    I am sorry but it doesn't work if you have two same objects in _myArray_. With var myArray = [ {group: "one", color: "red"}, {group: "two", color: "blue"}, {group: "one", color: "green"}, {group: "one", color: "black"}, {group: "one", color: "black"} ]; You will get myArray[0].color = ["red", "green", "black", "black"] – Lends Jul 28 '15 at 23:32
  • "Doesn't work" is subjective. OP never stated what to do in that case. – Jan Jul 28 '15 at 23:34
  • @Lends the OP never specified that as a requirement. In fact, given the comment from the OP I'd say this solution does indeed "work". – neuronaut Jul 28 '15 at 23:41
  • @neuronaut sorry, but maybe author just didn't check it and there is no any requirement except format of the objects in array. Never mind, your answer is confirmed one and I don't try to judge you. But it would be great if you would have time to correct this bug, so other people could use your code instead of dublicating this theme. Thanks! – Lends Jul 28 '15 at 23:46
  • The posted solution fills the requirement, the question says nothing about how to handle duplicates. A "fix" for an undefined problem is even likely to be more confusing to future readers who don't expect that functionality. – Jan Jul 28 '15 at 23:48
67

Start by creating a mapping of group names to values. Then transform into your desired format.

var myArray = [
    {group: "one", color: "red"},
    {group: "two", color: "blue"},
    {group: "one", color: "green"},
    {group: "one", color: "black"}
];

var group_to_values = myArray.reduce(function (obj, item) {
    obj[item.group] = obj[item.group] || [];
    obj[item.group].push(item.color);
    return obj;
}, {});

var groups = Object.keys(group_to_values).map(function (key) {
    return {group: key, color: group_to_values[key]};
});

var pre = document.createElement("pre");
pre.innerHTML = "groups:\n\n" + JSON.stringify(groups, null, 4);
document.body.appendChild(pre);

Using Array instance methods such as reduce and map gives you powerful higher-level constructs that can save you a lot of the pain of looping manually.

  • Great answer. With Object.entries and ES6 we can also do groups = Object.entries(group_to_values).map(([group, color]) => ({ group, color })); – a15n Jul 12 '17 at 22:39
  • Awesome! my problem was pulling the keys to form an array of objects using Object.keys – William Aug 2 '17 at 15:20
  • how would I do to get another element in the final object if my original array looks like {group: "one", color: "red", size:"big"}? – Jonathan Aug 11 '17 at 9:27
7

Use lodash's groupby method

Creates an object composed of keys generated from the results of running each element of collection thru iteratee. The order of grouped values is determined by the order they occur in collection. The corresponding value of each key is an array of elements responsible for generating the key. The iteratee is invoked with one argument: (value).

So with lodash you can get what you want in a single line. See below

let myArray = [
  {group: "one", color: "red"},
  {group: "two", color: "blue"},
  {group: "one", color: "green"},
  {group: "one", color: "black"},
]
let grouppedArray=_.groupBy(myArray,'group')
console.log(grouppedArray)
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/lodash.js/4.17.4/lodash.min.js"></script>

  • the result is not the required data structure – Ibrahim Mohammed Aug 4 '18 at 22:08
5

One option is:

var res = myArray.reduce(function(groups, currentValue) {
    if ( groups.indexOf(currentValue.group) === -1 ) {
      groups.push(currentValue.group);
    }
    return groups;
}, []).map(function(group) {
    return {
        group: group,
        color: myArray.filter(function(_el) {
          return _el.group === group;
        }).map(function(_el) { return _el.color; })
    }
});

http://jsfiddle.net/dvgwodxq/

  • 3
    Very elegant and self contained, nice. My only gripe is it's not as instantly readable as a simpler for loop. – Jan Jul 28 '15 at 23:46
  • 1
    reduce, indexOf, map, filter, map seems overly complex to me. – 1983 Jul 29 '15 at 1:00
  • 1
    @KingMob Define "complex". Those are regular array methods. – undefined Jul 29 '15 at 3:18
  • It works, but I need some time to go through the code and understand it. Thanks a lot for your help! – Nuno Nogueira Jul 29 '15 at 7:59
  • 1
    @NunoNogueira You are very welcome. That's just one of the options. – undefined Jul 29 '15 at 10:38
3

Beside the given approaches with a two pass approach, you could take a single loop approach by pushing the group if a new group is found.

var array = [{ group: "one", color: "red" }, { group: "two", color: "blue" }, { group: "one", color: "green" }, { group: "one", color: "black" }],
    groups = Object.create(null),
    grouped = [];

array.forEach(function (o) {
    if (!groups[o.group]) {
        groups[o.group] = [];
        grouped.push({ group: o.group, color: groups[o.group] });
    }
    groups[o.group].push(o.color);
});

console.log(grouped);
.as-console-wrapper { max-height: 100% !important; top: 0; }

3

myArray = [
  {group: "one", color: "red"},
  {group: "two", color: "blue"},
  {group: "one", color: "green"},
  {group: "one", color: "black"}
];


let group = myArray.map((item)=>  item.group ).filter((item, i, ar) => ar.indexOf(item) === i).sort((a, b)=> a - b).map(item=>{
    let new_list = myArray.filter(itm => itm.group == item).map(itm=>itm.color);
    return {group:item,color:new_list}
});
console.log(group);

2

This version takes advantage that object keys are unique. We process the original array and collect the colors by group in a new object. Then create new objects from that group -> color array map.

var myArray = [{
      group: "one",
      color: "red"
    }, {
      group: "two",
      color: "blue"
    }, {
      group: "one",
      color: "green"
    }, {
      group: "one",
      color: "black"
    }];

    //new object with keys as group and
    //color array as value
    var newArray = {};

    //iterate through each element of array
    myArray.forEach(function(val) {
      var curr = newArray[val.group]

      //if array key doesnt exist, init with empty array
      if (!curr) {
        newArray[val.group] = [];
      }

      //append color to this key
      newArray[val.group].push(val.color);
    });

    //remove elements from previous array
    myArray.length = 0;

    //replace elements with new objects made of
    //key value pairs from our created object
    for (var key in newArray) {
      myArray.push({
        'group': key,
        'color': newArray[key]
      });
    }

Please note that this does not take into account duplicate colors of the same group, so it is possible to have multiple of the same color in the array for a single group.

1
var array = [{
      id: "123",
      name: "aaaaaaaa"
    }, {
      id: "123",
      name: "aaaaaaaa"
    }, {
      id: '456',
      name: 'bbbbbbbbbb'
    }, {
      id: '789',
      name: 'ccccccccc'
    }, {
      id: '789',
      name: 'ccccccccc'
    }, {
      id: '098',
      name: 'dddddddddddd'
    }];
//if you want to group this array
group(array, key) {
  console.log(array);
  let finalArray = [];
  array.forEach(function(element) {
    var newArray = [];
    array.forEach(function(element1) {
      if (element[key] == element1[key]) {
          newArray.push(element)
      }
    });
    if (!(finalArray.some(arrVal => newArray[0][key] == arrVal[0][key]))) {
        finalArray.push(newArray);
    }
  });
  return finalArray
}
//and call this function
groupArray(arr, key) {
  console.log(this.group(arr, key))
}
1

Another option is using reduce() and new Map() to group the array. Use Spread syntax to convert set object into an array.

var myArray = [{"group":"one","color":"red"},{"group":"two","color":"blue"},{"group":"one","color":"green"},{"group":"one","color":"black"}]

var result = [...myArray.reduce((c, {group,color}) => {
  if (!c.has(group)) c.set(group, {group,color: []});
  c.get(group).color.push(color);
  return c;
}, new Map()).values()];

console.log(result);

0

You can do something like this:

function convert(items) {
    var result = [];

    items.forEach(function (element) {
        var existingElement = result.filter(function (item) {
            return item.group === element.group;
        })[0];

        if (existingElement) {
            existingElement.color.push(element.color);
        } else {
            element.color = [element.color];
            result.push(element);
        }

    });

    return result;
}
0

Using Array's reduce and findIndex methods, this can be achieved.

var myArray = [{
  group: "one",
  color: "red"
}, {
  group: "two",
  color: "blue"
}, {
  group: "one",
  color: "green"
}, {
  group: "one",
  color: "black"
}];

var transformedArray = myArray.reduce((acc, arr) => {
  var index = acc.findIndex(function(element) {
    return element.group === arr.group;
  });
  if (index === -1) {
    return acc.push({
      group: arr.group,
      color: [arr.color]
    });
  }
  
  acc[index].color.push(arr.color);
  return acc;
}, []);

console.log(transformedArray);

By using reduce function, array is iterator and the new values are stored in acc (accumulating) parameter. To check if the object with given group already exists we can use findIndex function.

If findIndex() return -1, the value does not exist, so add the array in the acc parameter.

If findIndex() return index, then update the index with the arr values.

0

You can extend array functionality with the next:

Array.prototype.groupBy = function(prop) {
  var result = this.reduce(function (groups, item) {
      const val = item[prop];
      groups[val] = groups[val] || [];
      groups[val].push(item);
      return groups;
  }, {});
  return Object.keys(result).map(function(key) {
      return result[key];
  });
};

Usage example:

/* re-usable function */
Array.prototype.groupBy = function(prop) {
  var result = this.reduce(function (groups, item) {
      const val = item[prop];
      groups[val] = groups[val] || [];
      groups[val].push(item);
      return groups;
  }, {});
  return Object.keys(result).map(function(key) {
      return result[key];
  });
};

var myArray = [
  {group: "one", color: "red"},
  {group: "two", color: "blue"},
  {group: "one", color: "green"},
  {group: "one", color: "black"}
]

console.log(myArray.groupBy('group'));

Credits: @Wahinya Brian

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