2

I'm trying to do a very simple thing with gcc assembler extension:

  • load an unsigned int variable into a register
  • add 1 to it
  • output the result

While compiling my solution:

#include <stdio.h>
#define inf_int volatile unsigned long long

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
   inf_int zero = 0;
   inf_int one = 1;
   inf_int infinity = ~0;
   printf("value of zero, one, infinity = %llu, %llu, %llu\n", zero, one, infinity);
   __asm__ volatile (
      "addq $1, %0"
      : "=r" (infinity)
   );
   __asm__ volatile (
      "addq $1, %0"
      : "=r" (zero)
   );
   __asm__ volatile (
      "addq $1, %0"
      : "=r" (one)
   );
   printf("value of zero, one, infinity = %llu, %llu, %llu\n", zero, one, infinity);
   return 0;
}

with the following switches:

gcc -std=c99 --pedantic -Wall  -c main.c -o main.o
gcc -std=c99 --pedantic -Wall  main.o -o main

I'd expect the following result from running main:

value of zero, one, infinity = 0, 1, 18446744073709551615

value of zero, one, infinity = 1, 2, 0

but the result I get is this:

value of zero, one, infinity = 0, 1, 18446744073709551615

value of zero, one, infinity = 60, 61, 59

Interestingly, if I add a single char to the first printf I get the following, off-by-one, output:

value of zerao, one, infinity = 0, 1, 18446744073709551615

value of zero, one, infinity = 61, 62, 60

Even more interestingly, I can fix the behaviour by adding (optional) output registers. But this would be wasteful because of using 2*more registers, and doesn't help me understand why the previous piece exhibits undefined behaviour.

#include <stdio.h>
#define inf_int volatile unsigned long long

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
   inf_int zero = 0;
   inf_int one = 1;
   inf_int infinity = ~0;
   printf("value of zerao, one, infinity = %llu, %llu, %llu\n", zero, one, infinity);
   __asm__ volatile (
      "addq $1, %0 \n\t"
      "movq %0, %1"
      : "=r" (zero)
      : "r" (zero)
   );
   __asm__ volatile (
      "addq $1, %0 \n\t"
      "movq %0, %1"
      : "=r" (one)
      : "r" (one)
   );
   __asm__ volatile (
      "addq $1, %0 \n\t"
      "movq %0, %1"
      : "=r" (infinity)
      : "r" (infinity)
   );
   printf("value of zero, one, infinity = %llu, %llu, %llu\n", zero, one, infinity);
   return 0;
}

edit

compiling with clang with the same options gives undefined behaviour as well:

value of zerao, one, infinity = 0, 1, 18446744073709551615

value of zero, one, infinity = 2147483590, 2147483591, 2147483592

edit 2

as suggested by Olaf, I've tried with uint64_t from stdint.h. The result of running the program is still undefined.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>
//#define inf_int volatile unsigned long long
#define inf_int uint64_t
int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
   inf_int zero = 0;
   inf_int one = 1;
   inf_int infinity = ~0;
   printf("value of zerao, one, infinity = %lu, %lu, %lu\n", zero, one, infinity);
   __asm__ volatile (
      "addq $1, %0 \n\t"
      : "=r" (zero)
   );
   __asm__ volatile (
      "addq $1, %0 \n\t"
      : "=r" (one)
   );
   __asm__ volatile (
      "addq $1, %0 \n\t"
      : "=r" (infinity)
   );
   printf("value of zero, one, infinity = %lu, %lu, %lu\n", zero, one, infinity);
   return 0;
}
  • 1
    C (any version) does not specify any kind of assembler syntax. That would be an compiler extension (here: gcc). Try adding "memory" to the clobber list. And use stdint.h variable types suitable for the register width of your CPU. What is the point in the movq instructions? – too honest for this site Jul 28 '15 at 23:51
  • @Olaf From the manual page of gcc extended asm: "When writing code that can be compiled with -ansi and the various -std options, use __asm__ instead of asm." So it looks that I'm at least as close to the standard as I can get. – Adam Kurkiewicz Jul 28 '15 at 23:55
  • asm is a keyword/function meant to be used assembler extension by the standard. But it is neither required to exist, nor is anything else specified. Actually, the standard just cites common practice (see the chapter name). Note that the gcc manual is not the official source of standard-compliance. For overflow, read the standard. It is very well defined (to be undefined behaviour). Note that the only valid standard is C11. Although C99 can also be used, as C11 mostly added features, unlike C99 did to C90 which changed semantics. – too honest for this site Jul 29 '15 at 0:00
  • OK, I know that overflow of unsigned integer in C99 is legal and defined as remainder modulo size. I didn't know about stdint.h, will try that. movq simply seems to fix the problem, bot on clang and on gcc. – Adam Kurkiewicz Jul 29 '15 at 0:05
  • tried with stdint.h, but no luck. – Adam Kurkiewicz Jul 29 '15 at 0:15
7

Your first code does not specify any inputs to the asm statements so the chosen register has an undefined value (which in this case was initially the return value of printf). The second example repeats the error of using an undefined value and adds further undefined behaviour by overwriting the input register with the output.

You could use two registers like:

__asm__ (
   "movq %1, %0 \n\t"
   "addq $1, %0"
   : "=r" (zero)
   : "r" (zero)
);

You could use an input/output argument:

__asm__ (
   "addq $1, %0"
   : "+r" (zero)
);

Which can be in memory as well as a register:

__asm__ (
   "addq $1, %0"
   : "+rm" (zero)
);

Or you could tie the input to the output:

__asm__ (
   "addq $1, %0"
   : "=rm" (zero)
   : "0" (zero)
);

And finally there is no need for any of the volatile modifiers.

  • Thanks, it all makes sense and works as well. The insight about printf is very interesting, and it's good to see that there are multiple ways to define input and output variables in gcc inline assembly. – Adam Kurkiewicz Jul 29 '15 at 0:29
1

To wrap it all up:

inline assembly is not the part of C standard, it's an extension so portability (even across compilers on the same hardware) is not guaranteed.

one good way to write it is following:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#define inf_int uint64_t
int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
   inf_int zero = 0;
   inf_int one = 1;
   inf_int infinity = ~0;
   printf("value of zero, one, infinity = %lu, %lu, %lu\n", zero, one, infinity);
   __asm__ (
      "addq $1, %0 \n\t"
      : "+r" (zero)
   );
   __asm__ (
      "addq $1, %0 \n\t"
      : "+r" (one)
   );
   __asm__ (
      "addq $1, %0 \n\t"
      : "+r" (infinity)
   );
   printf("value of zero, one, infinity = %lu, %lu, %lu\n", zero, one, infinity);
   return 0;
}
  • 1
    A more portable (across different compilers) way to write stuff in asm is to write whole functions in separate .asm files, which you assemble with yasm or similar. Then have your build system (Makefile or other) link the resulting object file with the objects resulting from compiling your C/C++ code. The x264 project does it this way, and can be compiled with several different compilers. – Peter Cordes Jul 29 '15 at 19:01

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