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def fnDecrypt():

    key = raw_input("Please type the offset factor key: ")
    name = raw_input("Please enter the name of the file you want to decrypt: ")
    offset_factor = key

    encrypted_message = open(name,'r')
    message = encrypted_message.read()
    print "The contents of the file you are decrypting is: " + message
    for c in message:
            number = ord(c)
            if c != " ":
                    number -= offset_factor
                    if number  > 126:
                           number = number + 94
                       new_character = chr(number)
            encrypted_message -= new_character
    print 1

    print encrypted_message

    return;

this code is supposed to decrypt a encrypted message using the same eight character key that was used to encrypt it.At the minute i have this error message : UnboundLocalError: local variable 'new_character' referenced before assignment

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  • 2
    Welcome to StackOverflow! You have provided some code, but haven't said what you want to achieve and how the code currently behaves. Please add example inputs, outputs and expected outputs to your question. – Artjom B. Jul 29 '15 at 14:47
  • when i run the code i get this error: TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for -=: 'int' and 'str' , but i cant manage to get this code to decrypt an encrypted message for example i encrypt the message "the moon was scary" with a generated key which gives me the offset factor of 57 then it encrypts to "OC@ HJJI R<N N><MTC" i want to now decrypt it using the same offset factor – Kirito Yuki Jul 29 '15 at 14:51
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    @hiroprotagonist It's a caesar cipher. – Artjom B. Jul 29 '15 at 15:05
  • 1
    well, a caesar cipher is a vigenere cipher where the length of the key is 1. – hiro protagonist Jul 29 '15 at 15:08
  • 1
    Again, please add the stacktrace (error) to your question. Comments may be deleted at any time. – Artjom B. Jul 29 '15 at 15:10
2

Your error "UnboundLocalError: local variable 'new_character' referenced before assignment" is caused because you access the new_character variable before you define it.

This can be seen when we focus on this part of your code:

if number > 126:
    number = number + 94
    new_character = chr(number)
encrypted_message -= new_character

As you see, you define new_character variable inside the if number > 126: block, yet you use it outside the if in encrypted_message -= new_character.

When your variable number is smaller than 126, you never enter the if block, thus you never define new_character.

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the stacktrace "UnboundLocalError: local variable 'new_character' referenced before assignment" happens typically when you try to use a variable that, to the computer, hasnt been referenced.

UnBoundLocalError: local variable referenced before assignment (Python)

your if conditional isnt true, and you're trying to use the variable new_character before its referenced. This is why its important to also write an else for debugging purposes.

     for c in message:
        number = ord(c)
        if c != " ":
                number -= offset_factor
                if number  > 126:
                       number = number + 94
                else:
                     print "Something went wrong"
                new_character = chr(number)
        encrypted_message -= new_character
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  • Whoever downvoted, could you tell me why so I could improve this and future answers? – awbemauler Jul 30 '15 at 14:46
  • I did. Call me a dick, but I think @MarkusMeskanen's answer is clear and readable, and yours - not as much, even after re-reading it a couple of times. It also lacks the word "scope", which is what OP should read about. Terrible spelling doesn't help either, sorry. Nothing personal, I've written worse answers - and I'd definitely reverse my vote if you could top Markus' answer :) – Tobia Tesan Aug 1 '15 at 10:45
  • I dont think you're a dick. Just wanted to know how I could improve my future answers. thank you. – awbemauler Aug 1 '15 at 18:30

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