50

I am getting the following error while trying to add a NOT NULL column to an existing table. Why is it happening ?. I tried rake db:reset thinking that the existing records are the problem, but even after resetting the DB, the problem persists. Can you please help me figure this out.

Migration File

class AddDivisionIdToProfile < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def self.up
    add_column :profiles, :division_id, :integer, :null => false
  end

  def self.down
    remove_column :profiles, :division_id
  end
end

Error Message

SQLite3::SQLException: Cannot add a NOT NULL column with default value NULL: ALTER TABLE "profiles" ADD "division_id" integer NOT NULL

35

You already have rows in the table, and you're adding a new column division_id. It needs something in that new column in each of the existing rows.

SQLite would typically choose NULL, but you've specified it can't be NULL, so what should it be? It has no way of knowing.

See Adding a Non-null Column with no Default Value in a Rails Migration

That blog's recommendation is to add the column without the not null constraint, and it'll be added with NULL in every row. Then you can fill in values in the division_id and then use change_column to add the not null constraint.

See the blog I linked to for an example of a migration script that does this three-step process.

  • 8
    Your assumption about there already being rows in the table sounds correct, and it would be with just about any other rdbms. However, I noted in my answer that SQLite is an exception to this. This error appears even when the table is empty, so I posted a shorter solution. – Jaime Bellmyer Jul 15 '11 at 16:36
  • This is not correct - sqlite does not have a way to change columns. I don't know what change_column is, but it's not sqlite. – Benubird Jun 23 '17 at 14:23
  • @Benubird, change_column is an API method in Ruby on Rails migrations, which is what the OP was asking about. – Bill Karwin Jun 23 '17 at 16:40
  • The question title is about sqlite3, though. I believe that internally the change_column command is actually deleting the table and rebuilding it, which is definitely something worth being aware of - especially if you have a big table, or if you want to run this on a live db (as it will be unstable while running) – Benubird Jun 26 '17 at 12:56
  • @Benubird, yes, the code in the SQLite adapter for Rails does simulate more operations for ALTER TABLE by creating a new table with a new definition, copying data from the old table to the new table, and then dropping the old table. – Bill Karwin Jun 26 '17 at 16:37
150

This is (what I would consider) a glitch with SQLite. This error occurs whether there are any records in the table or not.

When adding a table from scratch, you can specify NOT NULL, which is what you're doing with the ":null => false" notation. However, you can't do this when adding a column. SQLite's specification says you have to have a default for this, which is a poor choice. Adding a default value is not an option because it defeats the purpose of having a NOT NULL foreign key - namely, data integrity.

Here's a way to get around this glitch, and you can do it all in the same migration. NOTE: this is for the case where you don't already have records in the database.

class AddDivisionIdToProfile < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def self.up
    add_column :profiles, :division_id, :integer
    change_column :profiles, :division_id, :integer, :null => false
  end

  def self.down
    remove_column :profiles, :division_id
  end
end

We're adding the column without the NOT NULL constraint, then immediately altering the column to add the constraint. We can do this because while SQLite is apparently very concerned during a column add, it's not so picky with column changes. This is a clear design smell in my book.

It's definitely a hack, but it's shorter than multiple migrations and it will still work with more robust SQL databases in your production environment.

  • Yep, good answer, +1 from me – Bill Karwin Jul 16 '11 at 23:45
  • Thanks! This is exactly what I needed. – PBJ Sep 7 '11 at 7:49
  • works! Thanks for the help. – Hendrik Jan 5 '12 at 3:03
  • 15
    I'm curious how this works, since there is no ALTER COLUMN in SQLite. – Brian Ortiz Oct 7 '13 at 16:24
  • 2
    @BrianOrtiz, the technique to do ALTER COLUMN with SQLite is convoluted. You need to copy the table to a temp one, drop the existing table, re-create the table with the modified column, copy the temp table data to the newly created table, and finally drop the temp table. This is most likely what ROR does. And also it's dumb that SQLite doesn't have this built-in. – this.lau_ Jul 19 '17 at 18:24
6

If you have a table with existing rows then you will need to update the existing rows before adding your null constraint. The Guide on migrations recommends using a local model, like so:

Rails 4 and up:

class AddDivisionIdToProfile < ActiveRecord::Migration
  class Profile < ActiveRecord::Base
  end

  def change
    add_column :profiles, :division_id, :integer

    Profile.reset_column_information
    reversible do |dir|
      dir.up { Profile.update_all division_id: Division.first.id }
    end

    change_column :profiles, :division_id, :integer, :null => false
  end

end

Rails 3

class AddDivisionIdToProfile < ActiveRecord::Migration
  class Profile < ActiveRecord::Base
  end

  def change
    add_column :profiles, :division_id, :integer

    Profile.reset_column_information
    Profile.all.each do |profile|
      profile.update_attributes!(:division_id => Division.first.id)
    end

    change_column :profiles, :division_id, :integer, :null => false
  end

end
  • If you want your migration to be reversible (rake db:rollback) add down method and replace change with up – sampi Jun 9 '15 at 18:09

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