7

python's email.mime tends to use encoding base64 or 7bit and us-ascii. I would like to use quoted-printable and utf-8 as this is easier for humans to read and debug.

Currently, my emails look like

--===============6135350048414329636==
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain
Content-Transfer-Encoding: base64

IyEvYmluL2Jhc2gKCmZvciBpIGluIHs4Mjg4Li44N

or

--===============0756888342500148236==
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

happy face =E2=98=BA

I would like the raw email to be in quoted-printable unicode so it is easier for humans to read.

--===============5610730199728027971==
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

happy face ☺
3

3 Answers 3

11

short answer

set content-transfer-encoding

When creating the MIMEText object, which will be attached to the MIMEMultipart object, set the content-transfer-encoding to value quoted-printable first, then do set_payload. The order of operations matters.

from email.mime.multipart import MIMEMultipart
from email.mime.text import MIMEText

# first create MIMEText, then set content-transfer-encoding, then set payload
mt = MIMEText(None, _subtype='plain')
mt.replace_header('content-transfer-encoding', 'quoted-printable')
mt.set_payload(u'happy face ☺', 'utf-8')

# create the parent email object and the MIMEMultipart extension to it
email = MIMEMultipart('mixed')
inline = MIMEMultipart('alternative')

# assemble the objects
inline.attach(mt)
email.attach(inline)

set email charset and various encodings

cs = charset.Charset('utf-8')
cs.header_encoding = charset.QP
cs.body_encoding = charset.QP
email.set_charset(cs)

Result

This creates a raw email that is human readable (except the base64 encoded file attachment)

>>> print(email)
--===============5610730199728027971==
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

happy face ☺

--===============5610730199728027971==--

--===============0985725891393820576==
Content-Type: text/x-sh
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Transfer-Encoding: base64
Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="test.sh"

Zm9vYmFyc2RmYXNkZmtqaGFzZGZrbGhhc2ZrbGpoYXNma2xqaGFzZmtsaGZkYXNmCg==

--===============0985725891393820576==--

long answer

The following is a longer script to provide more context for the prior code snippets.

This script will send a text/plain section encoded in UTF-8. For fun, it will also attach a file. The raw email this produces will be human readable (except for the file attachment).

from __future__ import print_function

from email import charset    
from email.encoders import encode_base64
from email.mime.base import MIMEBase
from email.mime.multipart import MIMEMultipart
from email.mime.text import MIMEText
import mimetypes

# create the parent email object
email = MIMEMultipart('mixed')
# set email charset and email encodings
cs_ = charset.Charset('utf-8')
cs_.header_encoding = charset.QP
cs_.body_encoding = charset.QP
email.set_charset(cs_)

# create the 'text/plain' MIMEText
# first create MIMEText, then set content-transfer-encoding, then set payload
mt = MIMEText(None, _subtype='plain')
mt.replace_header('content-transfer-encoding', 'quoted-printable')
mt.set_payload(u'happy face ☺', 'utf-8')

# assemble the parts
inline = MIMEMultipart('alternative')
inline.attach(mt)
email.attach(inline)

# for fun, attach a file to the email
my_file = '/tmp/test.sh'
mimetype, encoding = mimetypes.guess_type(my_file)
mimetype = mimetype or 'application/octet-stream'
mimetype = mimetype.split('/', 1)
attachment = MIMEBase(mimetype[0], mimetype[1])
attachment.set_payload(open(my_file, 'rb').read())
encode_base64(attachment)
attachment.add_header('Content-Disposition', 'attachment', filename=os.path.basename(my_file))
email.attach(attachment)

Result

This creates a raw email that is human readable (except the base64 encoded file attachment)

>>> print(email)
--===============5610730199728027971==
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

happy face ☺

--===============5610730199728027971==--

--===============0985725891393820576==
Content-Type: text/x-sh
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Transfer-Encoding: base64
Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="test.sh"

Zm9vYmFyc2RmYXNkZmtqaGFzZGZrbGhhc2ZrbGpoYXNma2xqaGFzZmtsaGZkYXNmCg==

--===============0985725891393820576==--

(bonus) send the email

Using smtplib, the email can be emailed.

import smtplib

# set email address headers
email['From'] = 'me@email.com'
email['To'] = 'you@email.com'
email['Subject'] = 'hello'

# send the email
smtp_srv = smtplib.SMTP('localhost')
smtp_srv.set_debuglevel(True)
print(mesg_html, end='\n\n')
print(email.as_string(), end='\n\n')
smtp_srv.sendmail('me@email.com', 'you@email.com', email.as_string())
smtp_srv.quit()
5
  • 2
    The example doesn't seem to have quoted-printable encoding at all. Proper QP would look like happy face =E2=98=BA -- or, with the nasty overzealous encoding of spaces in Python's default QP implementation, happy=20face=20=E2=98=BA.
    – tripleee
    Jul 30, 2015 at 4:17
  • You can get the latter with mt.set_payload(u'happy face ☺'.encode('quoted-printable'), 'utf-8') I guess.
    – tripleee
    Jul 30, 2015 at 4:28
  • 1
    Also you should have _subtype='plain' not text/plain (the text is already implied, and not part of the subtype).
    – tripleee
    Jul 30, 2015 at 4:33
  • 1
    "The example doesn't seem to have quoted-printable encoding at all" Thanks @tripleee , I will review and correct within the next week. I have corrected the _subtype. Jul 30, 2015 at 20:15
  • That's not really necessary. Take the code from one of the linked proposed duplicates instead.
    – tripleee
    Jul 31, 2015 at 4:52
3

In trying to alter the body of an existing message (email.Message object) and set its encoding to quoted-printable, I found that this problem took way more effort than I had anticipated.

import email
#... 'part' is the Message object
content = part.get_payload(decode=True)
#... Modify content
part['Content-Transfer-Encoding'] = '8bit'
part.set_payload(content, 'UTF-8')
del part['Content-Transfer-Encoding']
email.encoders.encode_quopri(part)

Now, why do I set and then delete the Content-Transfer-Encoding header? The set_payload call will set the Content-Transfer-Encoding header and encode the data (to Base64) if no header exists. Otherwise, the set_payload call will assume the caller has already encoded the data and will not alter it (by encoding). So, it actually doesn't matter the value to which I set the Content-Transfer-Encoding header, only that I don't leave it blank.

But then why do I need to delete the header? The email.encoders.encode_quopri call will only add a header, so the message will result with multiple Content-Transfer-Encoding headers.

So, just using set_payload then encode_quopri for a message with no Content-Transfer-Encoding header will result in a quoted-printable representation of a Base64 string, and for a message with an existing Content-Transfer-Encoding header will result in a message with duplicate headers. Using encode_quopri then set_payload may result in duplicate headers, but will not encode the message. Hence the add/delete rigamarole to avoid dipping into the quopri module.

0

The most simple solution is just:

from email.mime.text import MIMEText
from email import charset

cs = charset.Charset('utf-8')
cs.body_encoding = charset.QP
message = MIMEText(your_body_here, 'plain', cs)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.