I have the following 2 data.frames:

a1 <- data.frame(a = 1:5, b=letters[1:5])
a2 <- data.frame(a = 1:3, b=letters[1:3])

I want to find the row a1 has that a2 doesn't.

Is there a built in function for this type of operation?

(p.s: I did write a solution for it, I am simply curious if someone already made a more crafted code)

Here is my solution:

a1 <- data.frame(a = 1:5, b=letters[1:5])
a2 <- data.frame(a = 1:3, b=letters[1:3])

rows.in.a1.that.are.not.in.a2  <- function(a1,a2)
{
    a1.vec <- apply(a1, 1, paste, collapse = "")
    a2.vec <- apply(a2, 1, paste, collapse = "")
    a1.without.a2.rows <- a1[!a1.vec %in% a2.vec,]
    return(a1.without.a2.rows)
}
rows.in.a1.that.are.not.in.a2(a1,a2)

12 Answers 12

up vote 73 down vote accepted

This doesn't answer your question directly, but it will give you the elements that are in common. This can be done with Paul Murrell's package compare:

library(compare)
a1 <- data.frame(a = 1:5, b = letters[1:5])
a2 <- data.frame(a = 1:3, b = letters[1:3])
comparison <- compare(a1,a2,allowAll=TRUE)
comparison$tM
#  a b
#1 1 a
#2 2 b
#3 3 c

The function compare gives you a lot of flexibility in terms of what kind of comparisons are allowed (e.g. changing order of elements of each vector, changing order and names of variables, shortening variables, changing case of strings). From this, you should be able to figure out what was missing from one or the other. For example (this is not very elegant):

difference <-
   data.frame(lapply(1:ncol(a1),function(i)setdiff(a1[,i],comparison$tM[,i])))
colnames(difference) <- colnames(a1)
difference
#  a b
#1 4 d
#2 5 e
  • 1
    I find this function confusing. I thought it would work for me, but it seems to only work as shown above if one set contains identically matching rows of the other set. Consider this case: a2 <- data.frame(a = c(1:3, 1), b = c(letters[1:3], "c")). Leave a1 the same. Now try the comparison. It's not clear to me even in reading the options what the proper way is to list only common elements. – Hendy Aug 8 '13 at 2:59

SQLDF provides a nice solution

a1 <- data.frame(a = 1:5, b=letters[1:5])
a2 <- data.frame(a = 1:3, b=letters[1:3])

require(sqldf)

a1NotIna2 <- sqldf('SELECT * FROM a1 EXCEPT SELECT * FROM a2')

And the rows which are in both data frames:

a1Ina2 <- sqldf('SELECT * FROM a1 INTERSECT SELECT * FROM a2')

The new version of dplyr has a function, anti_join, for exactly these kinds of comparisons

require(dplyr) 
anti_join(a1,a2)

And semi_join to filter rows in a1 that are also in a2

semi_join(a1,a2)
  • 11
    Thanks for anti_join and semi_join! – drastega Sep 8 '15 at 18:14
  • is there a reason why anti_join would return a null DF, as would sqldf, but the functions identical(a1,a2) and all.equal() would contradict that? – Mike Palmice Oct 10 '17 at 18:38
  • Just wanted to add here that anti_join and semi_join would not work in some cases like mine. I was getting "Error: Columns must be 1d atomic vectors or lists" for my data frame. Maybe I could process my data so that these functions work. Sqldf worked right out of the gate! – Akshay Gaur Nov 27 '17 at 15:53

In dplyr:

setdiff(a1,a2)

Basically, setdiff(bigFrame, smallFrame) gets you the extra records in the first table.

In the SQLverse this is called a

Left Excluding Join Venn Diagram

For good descriptions of all join options and set subjects, this is one of the best summaries I've seen put together to date: http://www.vertabelo.com/blog/technical-articles/sql-joins

But back to this question - here are the results for the setdiff() code when using the OP's data:

> a1
  a b
1 1 a
2 2 b
3 3 c
4 4 d
5 5 e

> a2
  a b
1 1 a
2 2 b
3 3 c

> setdiff(a1,a2)
  a b
1 4 d
2 5 e

Or even anti_join(a1,a2) will get you the same results.
For more info: https://www.rstudio.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/data-wrangling-cheatsheet.pdf

  • 1
    Since the OP asks for items in a1 that are not in a2, don't you want to use something like semi_join(a1, a2, by = c('a','b')) ? In the answer by "Rickard", I see that semi_join was suggested. – steveb Dec 14 '16 at 8:29
  • Sure! Another great choice, too; particularly if you have dataframes with only a join key and differing column names. – leerssej Apr 19 '17 at 22:58
  • setdiff is from lubridate::setdiff and not from library(dplyr) – mtelesha Sep 25 at 17:19
  • @mtelesha - Hmm, the docs and source code for dplyr show it being there: (dplyr.tidyverse.org/reference/setops.html , github.com/tidyverse/dplyr/blob/master/R/sets.). Additionally, when the dplyr library is loaded it even reports masking the base setdiff() function that works on two vectors: stat.ethz.ch/R-manual/R-devel/library/base/html/sets.html. Maybe you have loaded the lubridate library after dplyr and it is suggesting it as the source in the tabcomplete listing? – leerssej Sep 25 at 19:21

It is certainly not efficient for this particular purpose, but what I often do in these situations is to insert indicator variables in each data.frame and then merge:

a1$included_a1 <- TRUE
a2$included_a2 <- TRUE
res <- merge(a1, a2, all=TRUE)

missing values in included_a1 will note which rows are missing in a1. similarly for a2.

One problem with your solution is that the column orders must match. Another problem is that it is easy to imagine situations where the rows are coded as the same when in fact are different. The advantage of using merge is that you get for free all error checking that is necessary for a good solution.

  • So... in looking for a missing value, you create another missing value... How do you find the missing value(s) in included_a1? :-/ – Louis Maddox Jul 12 '14 at 15:15
  • 1
    use is.na() and subset, or dplyr::filter – Eduardo Leoni Sep 18 '15 at 16:53
  • Thank you for teaching a way without installing a new library! – Rodrigo Oct 8 at 16:12

I wrote a package (https://github.com/alexsanjoseph/compareDF) since I had the same issue.

  > df1 <- data.frame(a = 1:5, b=letters[1:5], row = 1:5)
  > df2 <- data.frame(a = 1:3, b=letters[1:3], row = 1:3)
  > df_compare = compare_df(df1, df2, "row")

  > df_compare$comparison_df
    row chng_type a b
  1   4         + 4 d
  2   5         + 5 e

A more complicated example:

library(compareDF)
df1 = data.frame(id1 = c("Mazda RX4", "Mazda RX4 Wag", "Datsun 710",
                         "Hornet 4 Drive", "Duster 360", "Merc 240D"),
                 id2 = c("Maz", "Maz", "Dat", "Hor", "Dus", "Mer"),
                 hp = c(110, 110, 181, 110, 245, 62),
                 cyl = c(6, 6, 4, 6, 8, 4),
                 qsec = c(16.46, 17.02, 33.00, 19.44, 15.84, 20.00))

df2 = data.frame(id1 = c("Mazda RX4", "Mazda RX4 Wag", "Datsun 710",
                         "Hornet 4 Drive", " Hornet Sportabout", "Valiant"),
                 id2 = c("Maz", "Maz", "Dat", "Hor", "Dus", "Val"),
                 hp = c(110, 110, 93, 110, 175, 105),
                 cyl = c(6, 6, 4, 6, 8, 6),
                 qsec = c(16.46, 17.02, 18.61, 19.44, 17.02, 20.22))

> df_compare$comparison_df
    grp chng_type                id1 id2  hp cyl  qsec
  1   1         -  Hornet Sportabout Dus 175   8 17.02
  2   2         +         Datsun 710 Dat 181   4 33.00
  3   2         -         Datsun 710 Dat  93   4 18.61
  4   3         +         Duster 360 Dus 245   8 15.84
  5   7         +          Merc 240D Mer  62   4 20.00
  6   8         -            Valiant Val 105   6 20.22

The package also has an html_output command for quick checking

df_compare$html_output enter image description here

Using diffobj package:

library(diffobj)

diffPrint(a1, a2)
diffObj(a1, a2)

enter image description here

enter image description here

I adapted the merge function to get this functionality. On larger dataframes it uses less memory than the full merge solution. And I can play with the names of the key columns.

Another solution is to use the library prob.

#  Derived from src/library/base/R/merge.R
#  Part of the R package, http://www.R-project.org
#
#  This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
#  it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
#  the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or
#  (at your option) any later version.
#
#  This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
#  but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
#  MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
#  GNU General Public License for more details.
#
#  A copy of the GNU General Public License is available at
#  http://www.r-project.org/Licenses/

XinY <-
    function(x, y, by = intersect(names(x), names(y)), by.x = by, by.y = by,
             notin = FALSE, incomparables = NULL,
             ...)
{
    fix.by <- function(by, df)
    {
        ## fix up 'by' to be a valid set of cols by number: 0 is row.names
        if(is.null(by)) by <- numeric(0L)
        by <- as.vector(by)
        nc <- ncol(df)
        if(is.character(by))
            by <- match(by, c("row.names", names(df))) - 1L
        else if(is.numeric(by)) {
            if(any(by < 0L) || any(by > nc))
                stop("'by' must match numbers of columns")
        } else if(is.logical(by)) {
            if(length(by) != nc) stop("'by' must match number of columns")
            by <- seq_along(by)[by]
        } else stop("'by' must specify column(s) as numbers, names or logical")
        if(any(is.na(by))) stop("'by' must specify valid column(s)")
        unique(by)
    }

    nx <- nrow(x <- as.data.frame(x)); ny <- nrow(y <- as.data.frame(y))
    by.x <- fix.by(by.x, x)
    by.y <- fix.by(by.y, y)
    if((l.b <- length(by.x)) != length(by.y))
        stop("'by.x' and 'by.y' specify different numbers of columns")
    if(l.b == 0L) {
        ## was: stop("no columns to match on")
        ## returns x
        x
    }
    else {
        if(any(by.x == 0L)) {
            x <- cbind(Row.names = I(row.names(x)), x)
            by.x <- by.x + 1L
        }
        if(any(by.y == 0L)) {
            y <- cbind(Row.names = I(row.names(y)), y)
            by.y <- by.y + 1L
        }
        ## create keys from 'by' columns:
        if(l.b == 1L) {                  # (be faster)
            bx <- x[, by.x]; if(is.factor(bx)) bx <- as.character(bx)
            by <- y[, by.y]; if(is.factor(by)) by <- as.character(by)
        } else {
            ## Do these together for consistency in as.character.
            ## Use same set of names.
            bx <- x[, by.x, drop=FALSE]; by <- y[, by.y, drop=FALSE]
            names(bx) <- names(by) <- paste("V", seq_len(ncol(bx)), sep="")
            bz <- do.call("paste", c(rbind(bx, by), sep = "\r"))
            bx <- bz[seq_len(nx)]
            by <- bz[nx + seq_len(ny)]
        }
        comm <- match(bx, by, 0L)
        if (notin) {
            res <- x[comm == 0,]
        } else {
            res <- x[comm > 0,]
        }
    }
    ## avoid a copy
    ## row.names(res) <- NULL
    attr(res, "row.names") <- .set_row_names(nrow(res))
    res
}


XnotinY <-
    function(x, y, by = intersect(names(x), names(y)), by.x = by, by.y = by,
             notin = TRUE, incomparables = NULL,
             ...)
{
    XinY(x,y,by,by.x,by.y,notin,incomparables)
}

You could use the daff package (which wraps the daff.js library using the V8 package):

library(daff)

diff_data(data_ref = a2,
          data = a1)

produces the following difference object:

Daff Comparison: ‘a2’ vs. ‘a1’ 
  First 6 and last 6 patch lines:
   @@   a   b
1 ... ... ...
2       3   c
3 +++   4   d
4 +++   5   e
5 ... ... ...
6 ... ... ...
7       3   c
8 +++   4   d
9 +++   5   e

The diff format is described in Coopy highlighter diff format for tables and should be pretty self-explanatory. The lines with +++ in the first column @@ are the ones which are new in a1 and not present in a2.

The difference object can be used to patch_data(), to store the difference for documentation purposes using write_diff() or to visualize the difference using render_diff():

render_diff(
    diff_data(data_ref = a2,
              data = a1)
)

generates a neat HTML output:

enter image description here

Your example data does not have any duplicates, but your solution handle them automatically. This means that potentially some of the answers won't match to results of your function in case of duplicates.
Here is my solution which address duplicates the same way as yours. It also scales great!

a1 <- data.frame(a = 1:5, b=letters[1:5])
a2 <- data.frame(a = 1:3, b=letters[1:3])
rows.in.a1.that.are.not.in.a2  <- function(a1,a2)
{
    a1.vec <- apply(a1, 1, paste, collapse = "")
    a2.vec <- apply(a2, 1, paste, collapse = "")
    a1.without.a2.rows <- a1[!a1.vec %in% a2.vec,]
    return(a1.without.a2.rows)
}

library(data.table)
setDT(a1)
setDT(a2)

# no duplicates - as in example code
r <- fsetdiff(a1, a2)
all.equal(r, rows.in.a1.that.are.not.in.a2(a1,a2))
#[1] TRUE

# handling duplicates - make some duplicates
a1 <- rbind(a1, a1, a1)
a2 <- rbind(a2, a2, a2)
r <- fsetdiff(a1, a2, all = TRUE)
all.equal(r, rows.in.a1.that.are.not.in.a2(a1,a2))
#[1] TRUE

It needs data.table 1.9.8+

Maybe it is too simplistic, but I used this solution and I find it very useful when I have a primary key that I can use to compare data sets. Hope it can help.

a1 <- data.frame(a = 1:5, b = letters[1:5])
a2 <- data.frame(a = 1:3, b = letters[1:3])
different.names <- (!a1$a %in% a2$a)
not.in.a2 <- a1[different.names,]
  • How is this different from what OP already tried? You've used the exact same code like Tal to compare a single column instead of the whole row (which was the requirement) – David Arenburg Sep 5 '16 at 8:29

Yet another solution based on match_df in plyr. Here's plyr's match_df:

match_df <- function (x, y, on = NULL) 
{
    if (is.null(on)) {
        on <- intersect(names(x), names(y))
        message("Matching on: ", paste(on, collapse = ", "))
    }
    keys <- join.keys(x, y, on)
    x[keys$x %in% keys$y, , drop = FALSE]
}

We can modify it to negate:

library(plyr)
negate_match_df <- function (x, y, on = NULL) 
{
    if (is.null(on)) {
        on <- intersect(names(x), names(y))
        message("Matching on: ", paste(on, collapse = ", "))
    }
    keys <- join.keys(x, y, on)
    x[!(keys$x %in% keys$y), , drop = FALSE]
}

Then:

diff <- negate_match_df(a1,a2)

Using subset:

missing<-subset(a1, !(a %in% a2$a))
  • This answer works for the OP's scenario. What about the more general case when the variable "a" does match between the two data.frames("a1" and "a2"), but the variable "b" does not? – Bryan F Sep 12 at 20:44

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