20

I have been recently asked by a co-worker: Is it possible just take the first five elements and the last five elements by one query from an array?

int[] someArray = { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 };

What I've tried:

int[] someArray = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 };
var firstFiveResults = someArray.Take(5);
var lastFiveResults = someArray.Skip(someArray.Count() - 5).Take(5);
var result = firstFiveResults;
result = result.Concat(lastFiveResults);

Is it possible to just take the first five elements and the last five elements by one query?

7
  • 2
    Did you try var result = someArray.Take(5).Union(someArray.Skip(someArray.Count() - 5).Take(5)); ? Jul 30 '15 at 8:23
  • how about someArray.Take(5).Concat(someArray.Reverse().Take(5)); ?
    – Nilesh
    Jul 30 '15 at 8:26
  • @MitatKoyuncu, Union removes duplicate entries which may or may not be what you want. If you definitely want 10 results in the output, use Concat Jul 30 '15 at 8:27
  • 1
    @StepUp, also, what if someArray has fewer than 10 or fewer than 5 inputs. Your question is not specific enough to provide a good, robust answer to as it stands. Jul 30 '15 at 8:36
  • 1
    @StepUp, no such thing as a dummy question :) I mean what type would the parameter to the method you want created for you be? For example, it could be int[], or T[] (if generic), however it could also be defined in terms of one of several interfaces commonly used for collection classes. For example, most of linq is defined on IEnumerable<T> which is very generic. You could also define it on IReadOnlyList<T>, IList<T>, ICollection<T>... the 'type' you choose determines what valid collections someone can pass to the method, and it also restricts techniques the implementation can use. Aug 15 '15 at 15:07
29

You can use a .Where method with lambda that accepts the element index as its second parameter:

int[] someArray = { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 };

int[] newArray = someArray.Where((e, i) => i < 5 || i >= someArray.Length - 5).ToArray();

foreach (var item in newArray) 
{
    Console.WriteLine(item);
}

Output:

0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18
5
  • 3
    This answer is one of the only here that doesn't throw if the input sequence has fewer than 5 items. However OP never specified behaviour for that case -- i.e. should the overlapping head and tail be duplicated in the output? Jul 30 '15 at 8:34
  • Considering that Enumerable.Take doesn't throw if sequence has fewer items than requested, I would consider @Fabjan's solution to have 'the correct behavior' if not specified otherwise. Jul 30 '15 at 8:36
  • In the case where someArray has a length in the interval 5..9 this solution does not give the same result as my solutions (below). Can the asker guarantee that the array is always long enough? In the case where the length of the array is under 5, my solutions throw an exception, whereas the above solution yields all entries once. Jul 30 '15 at 8:42
  • 2
    Just a coding thing, but I would prefer (_, i) => i < 5 || i >= someArray.Length - 5. _ indicates the variable is not used. >= allows the 5 to correspond to the number of elements taken from the end of the list.
    – Dorus
    Jul 30 '15 at 11:24
  • Fabjan, this was not meant as a criticism of your answer. As @Discosultan said, your solution (in the case where the array length is below 10) might be a natural one. I just wanted to mention that there are several possible interpretations of what is "correct" when the array has fewer than 10 entries. If the array was incredibly long, say 100,000,000 entries, your method would have to evaluate the Func<,,>passed to Where very many times. In such situations, my solutions would be faster. Since this is probably micro-optimization, it could be entirely irrelevant. Jul 30 '15 at 12:02
11

A solution with ArraySegment<> (requires .NET 4.5 (2012) or later):

var result = new ArraySegment<int>(someArray, 0, 5)
  .Concat(new ArraySegment<int>(someArray, someArray.Length - 5, 5));

And a solution with Enumerable.Range:

var result = Enumerable.Range(0, 5).Concat(Enumerable.Range(someArray.Length - 5, 5))
  .Select(idx => someArray[idx]);

Both these solution avoid iterating through the "middle" of the array (indices 5 through 13).

6

In case you are not playing code puzzles with your co-workers, but just want to create a new array with your criteria, I wouldn't do this with queries at all, but use Array.copy.

There are three distinct cases to consider:

  • the source array has fewer than 5 items
  • the source array has 5 to 9 items
  • the source array has 10 or more items

The third one is the simple case, as the first and last 5 elements are distinct and well defined.

The other two require more thought. I'm going to assume you want the following, check those assumptions:

If the source array has fewer than 5 items, you will want to have an array of 2 * (array length) items, for example [1, 2, 3] becomes [1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3]

If the source array has between 5 and 9 items, you will want to have an array of exactly 10 items, for example [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6] becomes [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

A demonstration program is

public static void Main()
{
    Console.WriteLine(String.Join(", ", headandtail(new int[]{1, 2, 3})));
    Console.WriteLine(String.Join(", ", headandtail(new int[]{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6})));
    Console.WriteLine(String.Join(", ", headandtail(new int[]{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11})));
}

private static T[] headandtail<T>(T[] src) {
    int runlen = Math.Min(src.Length, 5);
    T[] result = new T[2 * runlen];
    Array.Copy(src, 0, result, 0, runlen);
    Array.Copy(src, src.Length - runlen, result, result.Length - runlen, runlen);
    return result;
}

which runs in O(1);

If you are playing code puzzles with your co-workers, well all the fun is in the puzzle, isn't it?

It's trivial though.

src.Take(5).Concat(src.Reverse().Take(5).Reverse()).ToArray();

this runs in O(n).

1
  • 1
    Thanks. It is awesome. However, the main criteria is one line of query-code, not the speed of execution. However, I really appreciate your awesome algorithm!:) take one point from me!
    – StepUp
    Jul 30 '15 at 15:00
4

Try this:

var result = someArray.Where((a, i) => i < 5 || i >= someArray.Length - 5);
1
  • 2
    This is a duplicate of Fabjan answer, and less extensive also. However using >= so that the 5 correspond to the actual number of elements taken is smart, also I would replace a with _ to indicate an unused variable.
    – Dorus
    Jul 30 '15 at 11:25
3

This should work

someArray.Take(5).Concat(someArray.Skip(someArray.Count() - 5)).Take(5);
3
  • 3
    Where is this different from what OP wrote? Jul 30 '15 at 8:25
  • This is quite inefficient. The call to Count() performs a full enumeration of the source, and Skip does a lot of work. If the function is to work on IEnumerable<T> it'd be best for this to enumerate the source only once. Jul 30 '15 at 8:34
  • 1
    @Drew The source in this case is a fixed size array, so I'd assume Count() uses an overload to simply return the size of the array.
    – Peter
    Jul 30 '15 at 10:54
2

Try this:

int[] someArray = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 };
var firstFiveResults = someArray.Take(5);
var lastFiveResults = someArray.Reverse().Take(5).Reverse();
var result = firstFiveResults;
result = result.Concat(lastFiveResults);

The second Reverse() reorders the numbers so you won't get 18,17,16,15,14

4
  • Two Reverse() are going to be even more inefficient than a Skip(...). Jul 30 '15 at 8:45
  • 3
    @JeppeStigNielsen - it depends entirely on the implementation.
    – NPSF3000
    Jul 30 '15 at 13:00
  • 1
    @NPSF3000 Certainly. But it surprises me much that someArray.Reverse().Take(5).Reverse().ToArray() is actually faster than someArray.Skip(someArray.Length - 5).ToArray() for huge arrays. I checked the source, and it turns out Skip makes no optimizations when the passed IEnumerable<T> has additional structure, so it iterates through in the slow way. While Reverse creates an internal struct Buffer<T> whose instance constructor uses the optimization CopyTo(T[], int) when it determines the source implements ICollection<T>. So I was wrong with respect to the actual implementation! Jul 31 '15 at 7:48
  • @JeppeStigNielsen hehehe, that's hilarious. Of course, you're just using one possible implementation of LINQ, and it'd be trivial to give Skip a performance boost.
    – NPSF3000
    Aug 1 '15 at 0:55
1

Please try this:

var result = someArray.Take(5).Union(someArray.Skip(someArray.Count() - 5).Take(5));
2
  • Union will throw away duplicates. The question does not indicate that behavior is desired. Edit: So what do you expect with int[] someArray = { 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, };? Jul 30 '15 at 8:33
  • 1
    @JeppeStigNielsen You are right. If array has duplicate record it is not work correctly. Jul 30 '15 at 8:37

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