11

How is it possible, that a huge difference in variable name length won't cause any performance loss in javascript?

It takes the same time to declare var a = 0; as it takes to declare var aaaaaaaaaaaaaaa = 0; It takes the same time even to execute computations with them.

My fiddle to demonstrate

3
  • This may have already been answered. Commented Jul 30, 2015 at 9:24
  • 5
    Because both variables are stored the same way in the memory. They get a memory address which is used when the code is being executed. There may be a minuscule difference in the declaration of the variable. If there is, it's negligible.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Jul 30, 2015 at 9:24
  • @Cerbrus, with a creditable reference, and some small details around the mechanism of memory addressing, I could accept Your explanation as an answer as well. Commented Jul 30, 2015 at 10:07

2 Answers 2

17
window.a = 2;
window.b = 3;
window.c = 4;
window.aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa = 2;
window.bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb = 3;
window.ccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccc = 4;    
var ts = [];

var t = performance.now();
for(var i = 0; i < 1000000; ++i) {
    a = b + c;
}
ts.push(performance.now() - t);

var t = performance.now();
for(var i = 0; i < 1000000; ++i) {
    aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa = bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb+ ccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccc;
}
ts.push(performance.now() - t);

console.log(ts);

running the above 10 times in browser console gives me the following statistics, being a=b+c, a=b...+c... pairs:

[4.050000000046566, 4.614999999990687]
[4.254999999946449, 4.59499999997206]
[4.054999999993015, 4.584999999962747]
[4.869999999995343, 5.4500000000116415]
[4.074999999953434, 4.570000000006985]
[4.099999999976717, 4.775000000023283]
[4.205000000016298, 4.649999999965075]
[4.205000000016298, 4.669999999983702]
[4.159999999974389, 4.720000000030268]
[4.149999999965075, 4.684999999997672]

The longer version is ALWAYS slower.

in the case of local variables, this is different because they are compiled once and referred to using getlocal/setlocal instructions by index rather than by name. So let's see..

(function() {
    var a = 2;
    var b = 3;
    var c = 4;
    var aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa = 2;
    var bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb = 3;
    var ccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccc = 4;    
    var ts = [];

    var t = performance.now();
    for(var i = 0; i < 1000000; ++i) {
        a = b + c;
    }
    ts.push(performance.now() - t);

    var t = performance.now();
    for(var i = 0; i < 1000000; ++i) {
        aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa = bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb+ ccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccc;
    }
    ts.push(performance.now() - t);

    console.log(ts);
})();

[2.5850000000791624, 2.2100000000791624] (longer wins)
[2.7950000000419095, 2.525000000023283] (shorter wins)
[2.4699999999720603, 2.4200000000419095] (longer wins)
[2.64000000001397, 2.2449999999953434] (longer wins)
[2.669999999925494, 2.469999999855645] (longer wins)
[2.5200000000186265, 2.7800000000279397] (shorter wins)
[2.4600000000791624, 2.3950000000186265] (longer wins)
[3.2900000001536682, 3.1299999998882413] (longer wins)
[3.1949999999487773, 3.1850000000558794] (longer wins)
[3.8049999999348074, 3.0200000000186265] (longer wins)

While they do vary quite surprisingly on most iterations, there are quite a few cases where the longer variable name was faster than the shorter variable name(a naive observer might conclude that the longer name makes it faster). This is because name was only relevant when the scope was being compiled; the instructions actually being executed do not refer to the variables by name.

My conclusion is; keep global variable names short, local variable names will slightly increase translation from text to instructions, but after this, it won't matter.

I assume javascript works similarly to actionscript in how it deals with variables so here's an actionscript dump of the two bytecodes side by side. (Adobe Flash CS3; decompiled with JPEXS free flash decompiler).

var a;
var b = 2;
var c = 3;
var aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa;
var bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb = 2;
var ccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccc = 3;    

function long_global()
{        
    for(var i = 0; i < 1000000; ++i) {
        aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa = bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb + ccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccc;
    }
}

function short_global()
{
    for(var i = 0; i < 1000000; ++i) {
        a = b + c;
    }
}

function long_local()
{        
    var aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa;
    var bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb = 2;
    var ccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccc = 3;

    for(var i = 0; i < 1000000; ++i) {
        aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa = bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb + ccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccc;
    }
}

function short_local()
{
    var a;
    var b = 2;
    var c = 3;

    for(var i = 0; i < 1000000; ++i) {
        a = b + c;
    }
}

long_global compiles to:

; d0
getlocal_0
; 30
pushscope
; 21
pushundefined
; 82
coerce_a
; d5
setlocal_1
; 24 00
pushbyte 0
; 82
coerce_a
; d5
setlocal_1
; 10 0e 00 00
jump ofs001b
; 09
ofs000d:label
; 5e 0a
findproperty Qname(PackageNamespace(""),"aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa")
; 60 09
getlex Qname(PackageNamespace(""),"bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb")
; 60 06
getlex Qname(PackageNamespace(""),"ccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccc")
; a0
add
; 68 0a
initproperty Qname(PackageNamespace(""),"aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa")
; d1
getlocal_1
; 91
increment
; 82
coerce_a
; d5
setlocal_1
; d1
ofs001b:getlocal_1
; 2d 01
pushint 1000000
; 15 eb ff ff
iflt ofs000d
; 47
returnvoid

short_global compiles to

; d0
getlocal_0
; 30
pushscope
; 21
pushundefined
; 82
coerce_a
; d5
setlocal_1
; 24 00
pushbyte 0
; 82
coerce_a
; d5
setlocal_1
; 10 0e 00 00
jump ofs001b
; 09
ofs000d:label
; 5e 08
findproperty Qname(PackageNamespace(""),"a")
; 60 05
getlex Qname(PackageNamespace(""),"b")
; 60 04
getlex Qname(PackageNamespace(""),"c")
; a0
add
; 68 08
initproperty Qname(PackageNamespace(""),"a")
; d1
getlocal_1
; 91
increment
; 82
coerce_a
; d5
setlocal_1
; d1
ofs001b:getlocal_1
; 2d 01
pushint 1000000
; 15 eb ff ff
iflt ofs000d
; 47
returnvoid

long_local:

; d0
getlocal_0
; 30
pushscope
; 21
pushundefined
; 82
coerce_a
; d5
setlocal_1
; 21
pushundefined
; 82
coerce_a
; d6
setlocal_2
; 21
pushundefined
; 82
coerce_a
; d7
setlocal_3
; 21
pushundefined
; 82
coerce_a
; 63 04
setlocal 4
; 24 02
pushbyte 2
; 82
coerce_a
; d6
setlocal_2
; 24 03
pushbyte 3
; 82
coerce_a
; d7
setlocal_3
; 24 00
pushbyte 0
; 82
coerce_a
; 63 04
setlocal 4
; 10 0c 00 00
jump ofs002c
; 09
ofs0020:label
; d2
getlocal_2
; d3
getlocal_3
; a0
add
; 82
coerce_a
; d5
setlocal_1
; 62 04
getlocal 4
; 91
increment
; 82
coerce_a
; 63 04
setlocal 4
; 62 04
ofs002c:getlocal 4
; 2d 01
pushint 1000000
; 15 ec ff ff
iflt ofs0020
; 47
returnvoid

short_local:

; d0
getlocal_0
; 30
pushscope
; 21
pushundefined
; 82
coerce_a
; d5
setlocal_1
; 21
pushundefined
; 82
coerce_a
; d6
setlocal_2
; 21
pushundefined
; 82
coerce_a
; d7
setlocal_3
; 21
pushundefined
; 82
coerce_a
; 63 04
setlocal 4
; 24 02
pushbyte 2
; 82
coerce_a
; d6
setlocal_2
; 24 03
pushbyte 3
; 82
coerce_a
; d7
setlocal_3
; 24 00
pushbyte 0
; 82
coerce_a
; 63 04
setlocal 4
; 10 0c 00 00
jump ofs002c
; 09
ofs0020:label
; d2
getlocal_2
; d3
getlocal_3
; a0
add
; 82
coerce_a
; d5
setlocal_1
; 62 04
getlocal 4
; 91
increment
; 82
coerce_a
; 63 04
setlocal 4
; 62 04
ofs002c:getlocal 4
; 2d 01
pushint 1000000
; 15 ec ff ff
iflt ofs0020
; 47
returnvoid

the byte code size of long_global and short_global; and short_local and long_local respectively are equivelent, however in local case, they are not referenced by name, only by setlocal and getlocal; whereas in global case, they are referenced by index of where the string key is; my guess is that the longer one takes longer to hash to get the referent, whereas the shorter one takes shorter to hash to get the referent before it can be used.

2
  • side note that making global variable names short goes against Linux Kernel Coding Style(which are only guidelines), please don't actually make global variables named a, b, c unless they are exceptionally HOT in your code. i am talking jquery's $(in code that exclusively uses jquery at any opportunity it can) or Math.PI(which will still likely be faster in loops if the javascript compiler recognizes Math.PI and inlines it) or eax/rax register levels of hot here.
    – Dmytro
    Commented May 14, 2019 at 20:34
  • 1
    Thanks for the great writeup @Dmitry, very helpful explanation between the global and local variables naming Commented Jul 13, 2020 at 5:11
10

Based on @Cerbrus's comment:

It causes a negligibly small performance difference in practise, but only when declaring the variable. Afterwards, it gets a specific address in the memory, and it is referred as this address, not the variable name, so it won't affect the performance anymore.


However, talking about a scripting language used mostly on web, shorter variable names can reduce the filesize, and speed up pageloads. This is one of the features of the JS compilers, such as Google's.

3
  • 4
    not always true; this is only the case for local variables, such as explicit arguments and scope variables. when you do things like window.bar = 2, it isn't referred to using getlocal_index, it has to take the string bar and look up the actual value by hashing the name. so window.gkijqjqiwiwiwododo = window.qwdoijqwodjqoiwjdiqjwdiwq + window.cjqjiwjqijwijwijwiwiwk would be negligibly slower than window.a = window.b + window.c after declaring it. Kinda wanna test it now.
    – Dmytro
    Commented Dec 2, 2017 at 1:51
  • 1
    Does this apply to object property names as well? Commented Mar 10, 2020 at 17:36
  • Great question, @WinstonJude! I will take a look Commented Mar 20, 2020 at 11:14

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