1

I want to ask how do we compare two types in C#.

My Scenario is:

Nullable<int> Rating;
int NeedCompareType;

Every time I compare these two, it will return false result. There is anyway for me to return true in this case because int type have in both lines.

My compare line is:

if(Rating.GetType() == NeedCompareType.GetType())

Edit: Actually this was my program code:

    public object this[string propertyName]
    {
        get
        {
            PropertyInfo property = GetType().GetProperty(propertyName);
            return property.GetValue(this, null);
        }
        set
        {
            PropertyInfo property = GetType().GetProperty(propertyName);
            IFormatProvider culture = new System.Globalization.CultureInfo("fr-FR", true);
            if (property.PropertyType == typeof(System.DateTime))
            {
                property.SetValue(this, Convert.ToDateTime(value, culture), null);
            }
            else if (property.PropertyType == typeof(int))
            {
                property.SetValue(this, Int32.Parse((string)value));
            }
            else
            {
                property.SetValue(this, value, null);
            }

        }
    }

The aim of this code is to cast the value that the Controller receive from the browser as String type, then I want to convert to String type to the proper type of an unknown yet property of the model (in this case that was the public Nullable<int> Rating { get; set; }).

As you know I want when the propertyName = "Rating", it should execute the 2nd if statement, but it will not because the typeof(int) and typeof(Nullable<int>) will be different.

Sorry for my bad english

  • 5
    Their types are different. What result do you expect? Why there should be true? – Dennis Jul 30 '15 at 10:46
  • That's why i ask for how can we achieve this. Because Nullable<int> anyway will have int type in there. – Vũ Hoàng Huy Jul 30 '15 at 10:50
  • @VũHoàngHuy: It will when it's boxed, yes. I've answered your question as best I can, but it's really a pretty unclear question, particularly given that your claim about the comparison line is incorrect. A short but complete program demonstrating the problem would really help. – Jon Skeet Jul 30 '15 at 10:52
  • @JonSkeet: I have edited my question. Thanks – Vũ Hoàng Huy Jul 30 '15 at 11:05
  • Will do - but please, next time ask the question you actually want answered, instead of something else - that way you won't waste people's time. – Jon Skeet Jul 30 '15 at 11:07
4

Actually, this line:

if(Rating.GetType() == NeedCompareType.GetType())

would always either go into the condition, or throw a NullReferenceException - because Rating.GetType() will box Rating to either a boxed Int32 or a null reference.

Now if you're saying you want to compare typeof(int) and typeof(Nullable<int>) you could use:

public bool SomewhatEqual(Type t1, Type t2)
{
    return t1 == t2 ||
           t1 == Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(t2) ||
           Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(t1) == t2;
}

Now that we've seen the code you're actually interested in, it sounds like you just want to treat each property with a nullable type as if it were non-nullable. That's easy:

set
{
    PropertyInfo property = GetType().GetProperty(propertyName);
    Type type = property.GetType();
    // Treat nullable types as their underlying types.
    type = Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(type) ?? type;
    // TODO: Move this to a static readonly field. No need to
    // create a new one each time
    IFormatProvider culture = new CultureInfo("fr-FR", true);
    if (type == typeof(System.DateTime))
    {
        property.SetValue(this, Convert.ToDateTime(value, culture), null);
    }
    else if (type == typeof(int))
    {
        property.SetValue(this, Int32.Parse((string)value));
    }
    else
    {
        property.SetValue(this, value, null);
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Can you rel-ook a little bit my edited post, maybe you can help me to solve this problem more efficient – Vũ Hoàng Huy Jul 30 '15 at 11:06
  • Thank you very much, your way is clean and easy to understand. – Vũ Hoàng Huy Jul 31 '15 at 2:16

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