322

I need to convert seconds to "Hour:Minute:Second".

For example: "685" converted to "00:11:25"

How can I achieve this?

  • 4
    question is ambiguous: you want to convert your seconds to a date/time or to an amount of Hours:Minute:Seconds ? – WonderLand Jul 1 '14 at 11:35

26 Answers 26

726

You can use the gmdate() function:

echo gmdate("H:i:s", 685);
|improve this answer|||||
  • 164
    Better make sure the number of seconds is below 86,400 though. – salathe Jul 3 '10 at 19:15
  • 12
    H represents the amount of hours in a single day. So if you have 90000 seconds and you'll use H on it the result will be 01 (first hour of a next day). NOT 25 - there are only 24 hours in a day. – MarcinWolny Jun 20 '13 at 10:35
  • 7
    I'm not sure this is the right answer, this will produce a datetime ... so if we expect result > 24 hours it will not work. Also if we need some negative result ( for example working with offset ) it will not work. -1 for the lark of details – WonderLand Jul 1 '14 at 11:38
  • 54
    This shouldn't be the accepted answer due to the obvious flaw for times that are greater than 24 hours. – Scott Flack Sep 3 '14 at 5:23
  • 9
    For use with days when numbers might be bigger than 85399 you can use echo gmdate("z H:i:s", 685); z is the amount of days in the year starting with 0. You can obviously review the php date manual to cater to your specific needs. – Nightwolf Aug 11 '16 at 6:51
172

One hour is 3600sec, one minute is 60sec so why not:

<?php

$init = 685;
$hours = floor($init / 3600);
$minutes = floor(($init / 60) % 60);
$seconds = $init % 60;

echo "$hours:$minutes:$seconds";

?>

which produces:

$ php file.php
0:11:25

(I've not tested this much, so there might be errors with floor or so)

|improve this answer|||||
  • But he wants two zeros... "00:11:25" not "0:11:25" – animuson Jul 3 '10 at 18:23
  • 52
    printf("%02d:%02d:%02d", $hours, $minutes, $seconds); – Amber Jul 3 '10 at 18:26
  • 5
    Good answer, but make sure you subtract $hours*3600 and $minutes*60 from $init in between each operation otherwise you'll end up double counting minutes and seconds. – Mike Stowe Jul 25 '15 at 5:07
  • 5
    To add to @Amber's comment, use sprintf to return the value instead of printing it. – Allen Butler Sep 19 '16 at 18:33
76

here you go

function format_time($t,$f=':') // t = seconds, f = separator 
{
  return sprintf("%02d%s%02d%s%02d", floor($t/3600), $f, ($t/60)%60, $f, $t%60);
}

echo format_time(685); // 00:11:25
|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    Doesn't work for negative values. If you have negative seconds interval, use this: return ($t< 0 ? '-' : '') . sprintf("%02d%s%02d%s%02d", floor(abs($t)/3600), $f, (abs($t)/60)%60, $f, abs($t)%60); } – Ajax Nov 15 '13 at 10:25
66

Use function gmdate() only if seconds are less than 86400 (1 day) :

$seconds = 8525;
echo gmdate('H:i:s', $seconds);
# 02:22:05

See: gmdate()

Run the Demo


Convert seconds to format by 'foot' no limit* :

$seconds = 8525;
$H = floor($seconds / 3600);
$i = ($seconds / 60) % 60;
$s = $seconds % 60;
echo sprintf("%02d:%02d:%02d", $H, $i, $s);
# 02:22:05

See: floor(), sprintf(), arithmetic operators

Run the Demo


Example use of DateTime extension:

$seconds = 8525;
$zero    = new DateTime("@0");
$offset  = new DateTime("@$seconds");
$diff    = $zero->diff($offset);
echo sprintf("%02d:%02d:%02d", $diff->days * 24 + $diff->h, $diff->i, $diff->s);
# 02:22:05

See: DateTime::__construct(), DateTime::modify(), clone, sprintf()

Run the Demo


MySQL example range of the result is constrained to that of the TIME data type, which is from -838:59:59 to 838:59:59 :

SELECT SEC_TO_TIME(8525);
# 02:22:05

See: SEC_TO_TIME

Run the Demo


PostgreSQL example:

SELECT TO_CHAR('8525 second'::interval, 'HH24:MI:SS');
# 02:22:05

Run the Demo

|improve this answer|||||
30

Other solutions use gmdate, but fail in edge cases where you have more than 86400 seconds. To get around this, we can simply compute the number of hours ourselves, then let gmdate compute the remaining seconds into minutes/seconds.

echo floor($seconds / 3600) . gmdate(":i:s", $seconds % 3600);

Input: 6030 Output: 1:40:30

Input: 2000006030 Output: 555557:13:50

|improve this answer|||||
16
// TEST
// 1 Day 6 Hours 50 Minutes 31 Seconds ~ 111031 seconds

$time = 111031; // time duration in seconds

$days = floor($time / (60 * 60 * 24));
$time -= $days * (60 * 60 * 24);

$hours = floor($time / (60 * 60));
$time -= $hours * (60 * 60);

$minutes = floor($time / 60);
$time -= $minutes * 60;

$seconds = floor($time);
$time -= $seconds;

echo "{$days}d {$hours}h {$minutes}m {$seconds}s"; // 1d 6h 50m 31s
|improve this answer|||||
  • $hms=gmdate("H:i:s",12720); it not enough to get Day-Hour-Min-Sec – mughal Aug 3 '13 at 14:56
7
gmdate("H:i:s", no_of_seconds);

Will not give time in H:i:s format if no_of_seconds is greater than 1 day (seconds in a day).
It will neglect day value and give only Hour:Min:Seconds

For example:

gmdate("H:i:s", 89922); // returns 0:58:42 not (1 Day 0:58:42) or 24:58:42
|improve this answer|||||
6

Here is a one liner that handles negative seconds and more than 1 day worth of seconds.

sprintf("%s:%'02s:%'02s\n", intval($seconds/60/60), abs(intval(($seconds%3600) / 60)), abs($seconds%60));

For Example:

$seconds= -24*60*60 - 2*60*60 - 3*60 - 4; // minus 1 day 2 hours 3 minutes 4 seconds
echo sprintf("%s:%'02s:%'02s\n", intval($seconds/60/60), abs(intval(($seconds%3600) / 60)), abs($seconds%60));

outputs: -26:03:04

|improve this answer|||||
  • won't work if negative and less than 1 hour: -3000 = 0:50:00 should be -0:50:00 – Tony Brix May 15 '15 at 15:52
5

write function like this to return an array

function secondsToTime($seconds) {

  // extract hours
  $hours = floor($seconds / (60 * 60));

  // extract minutes
  $divisor_for_minutes = $seconds % (60 * 60);
  $minutes = floor($divisor_for_minutes / 60);

  // extract the remaining seconds
  $divisor_for_seconds = $divisor_for_minutes % 60;
  $seconds = ceil($divisor_for_seconds);

  // return the final array
  $obj = array(
      "h" => (int) $hours,
      "m" => (int) $minutes,
      "s" => (int) $seconds,
   );

  return $obj;
}

then simply call the function like this:

secondsToTime(100);

output is

Array ( [h] => 0 [m] => 1 [s] => 40 )
|improve this answer|||||
4

See:

    /** 
     * Convert number of seconds into hours, minutes and seconds 
     * and return an array containing those values 
     * 
     * @param integer $inputSeconds Number of seconds to parse 
     * @return array 
     */ 

    function secondsToTime($inputSeconds) {

        $secondsInAMinute = 60;
        $secondsInAnHour  = 60 * $secondsInAMinute;
        $secondsInADay    = 24 * $secondsInAnHour;

        // extract days
        $days = floor($inputSeconds / $secondsInADay);

        // extract hours
        $hourSeconds = $inputSeconds % $secondsInADay;
        $hours = floor($hourSeconds / $secondsInAnHour);

        // extract minutes
        $minuteSeconds = $hourSeconds % $secondsInAnHour;
        $minutes = floor($minuteSeconds / $secondsInAMinute);

        // extract the remaining seconds
        $remainingSeconds = $minuteSeconds % $secondsInAMinute;
        $seconds = ceil($remainingSeconds);

        // return the final array
        $obj = array(
            'd' => (int) $days,
            'h' => (int) $hours,
            'm' => (int) $minutes,
            's' => (int) $seconds,
        );
        return $obj;
    }

From: Convert seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds

|improve this answer|||||
4

If you don't like accepted answer or popular ones, then try this one

function secondsToTime($seconds_time)
{
    if ($seconds_time < 24 * 60 * 60) {
        return gmdate('H:i:s', $seconds_time);
    } else {
        $hours = floor($seconds_time / 3600);
        $minutes = floor(($seconds_time - $hours * 3600) / 60);
        $seconds = floor($seconds_time - ($hours * 3600) - ($minutes * 60));
        return "$hours:$minutes:$seconds";
    }
}

secondsToTime(108620); // 30:10:20
|improve this answer|||||
3

Try this:

date("H:i:s",-57600 + 685);

Taken from
http://bytes.com/topic/php/answers/3917-seconds-converted-hh-mm-ss

|improve this answer|||||
  • Not entirely sure, but I'm pretty sure it's setting the time to 0 and then anything on top of that would simply be the correct answer – Kerry Jones Feb 3 '12 at 0:35
  • This puts leading 0's in front of the minutes, which you can't adjust with date() - ca.php.net/manual/en/function.date.php – barfoon Jun 24 '12 at 3:41
  • @barfoon -- true, but I believe this is what M.Ezz was asking for, and it is a standard used in time. This looks strange from my experience "3:7:5" instead of "03:07:05", or even "3:7", looks more like a ratio to me. – Kerry Jones Jun 25 '12 at 17:08
3

The gmtdate() function didn't work for me as I was tracking hours worked on a project and if it's over 24 hours, you get amount left over after 24 hours is subtracted. In other words 37 hours becomes 13 hours. (all as stated above by Glavic - thanks for your examples!) This one worked well:

Convert seconds to format by 'foot' no limit :
$seconds = 8525;
$H = floor($seconds / 3600);
$i = ($seconds / 60) % 60;
$s = $seconds % 60;
echo sprintf("%02d:%02d:%02d", $H, $i, $s);
# 02:22:05
|improve this answer|||||
3

This function my be useful, you could extend it:

function formatSeconds($seconds) {

if(!is_integer($seconds)) {
    return FALSE;
}

$fmt = "";

$days = floor($seconds / 86400);
if($days) {
    $fmt .= $days."D ";
    $seconds %= 86400;
}

$hours = floor($seconds / 3600);
if($hours) {
    $fmt .= str_pad($hours, 2, '0', STR_PAD_LEFT).":";
    $seconds %= 3600;
}

$mins = floor($seconds / 60 );
if($mins) {
    $fmt .= str_pad($mins, 2, '0', STR_PAD_LEFT).":";
    $seconds %= 60;
}

$fmt .= str_pad($seconds, 2, '0', STR_PAD_LEFT);

return $fmt;}
|improve this answer|||||
2

Solution from: https://gist.github.com/SteveJobzniak/c91a8e2426bac5cb9b0cbc1bdbc45e4b

Here is a very clean and short method!

This code avoids as much as possible of the tedious function calls and piece-by-piece string-building, and the big and bulky functions people are making for this.

It produces "1h05m00s" format and uses leading zeroes for minutes and seconds, as long as another non-zero time component precedes them.

And it skips all empty leading components to avoid giving you useless info like "0h00m01s" (instead that will show up as "1s").

Example results: "1s", "1m00s", "19m08s", "1h00m00s", "4h08m39s".

$duration = 1; // values 0 and higher are supported!
$converted = [
    'hours' => floor( $duration / 3600 ),
    'minutes' => floor( ( $duration / 60 ) % 60 ),
    'seconds' => ( $duration % 60 )
];
$result = ltrim( sprintf( '%02dh%02dm%02ds', $converted['hours'], $converted['minutes'], $converted['seconds'] ), '0hm' );
if( $result == 's' ) { $result = '0s'; }

If you want to make the code even shorter (but less readable), you can avoid the $converted array and instead put the values directly in the sprintf() call, as follows:

$duration = 1; // values 0 and higher are supported!
$result = ltrim( sprintf( '%02dh%02dm%02ds', floor( $duration / 3600 ), floor( ( $duration / 60 ) % 60 ), ( $duration % 60 ) ), '0hm' );
if( $result == 's' ) { $result = '0s'; }

Duration must be 0 or higher in both of the code pieces above. Negative durations are not supported. But you can handle negative durations by using the following alternative code instead:

$duration = -493; // negative values are supported!
$wasNegative = FALSE;
if( $duration < 0 ) { $wasNegative = TRUE; $duration = abs( $duration ); }
$converted = [
    'hours' => floor( $duration / 3600 ),
    'minutes' => floor( ( $duration / 60 ) % 60 ),
    'seconds' => ( $duration % 60 )
];
$result = ltrim( sprintf( '%02dh%02dm%02ds', $converted['hours'], $converted['minutes'], $converted['seconds'] ), '0hm' );
if( $result == 's' ) { $result = '0s'; }
if( $wasNegative ) { $result = "-{$result}"; }
// $result is now "-8m13s"
|improve this answer|||||
  • Note that the gmdate() hack is even shorter than this, but only supports durations up to 24 hours. Anything above 24 hours will fail if you use the gmdate trick! – gw0 Feb 5 '17 at 18:25
1

A simple way to use DateTime for this is:

    $time = 60; //sec.
    $now = time();
    $rep = new DateTime('@'.$now);
    $diff = new DateTime('@'.($now+$time));
    $return = $diff->diff($rep)->format($format);

    //output:  01:04:65

It's a simple solution wich gives you the ability to use the format Method of DateTime.

|improve this answer|||||
1

In java you can use this way.

   private String getHmaa(long seconds) {
    String string;
    int hours = (int) seconds / 3600;
    int remainder = (int) seconds - hours * 3600;
    int mins = remainder / 60;
    //remainder = remainder - mins * 60;
    //int secs = remainder;

    if (hours < 12 && hours > 0) {
        if (mins < 10) {
            string = String.valueOf((hours < 10 ? "0" + hours : hours) + ":" + (mins > 0 ? "0" + mins : "0") + " AM");
        } else {
            string = String.valueOf((hours < 10 ? "0" + hours : hours) + ":" + (mins > 0 ? mins : "0") + " AM");
        }
    } else if (hours >= 12) {
        if (mins < 10) {
            string = String.valueOf(((hours - 12) < 10 ? "0" + (hours - 12) : ((hours - 12) == 12 ? "0" : (hours - 12))) + ":" + (mins > 0 ? "0" + mins : "0") + ((hours - 12) == 12 ? " AM" : " PM"));
        } else {
            string = String.valueOf(((hours - 12) < 10 ? "0" + (hours - 12) : ((hours - 12) == 12 ? "0" : (hours - 12))) + ":" + (mins > 0 ? mins : "0") + ((hours - 12) == 12 ? " AM" : " PM"));
        }
    } else {
        if (mins < 10) {
            string = String.valueOf("0" + ":" + (mins > 0 ? "0" + mins : "0") + " AM");
        } else {
            string = String.valueOf("0" + ":" + (mins > 0 ? mins : "0") + " AM");
        }
    }
    return string;
}
|improve this answer|||||
0
function timeToSecond($time){
    $time_parts=explode(":",$time);
    $seconds= ($time_parts[0]*86400) + ($time_parts[1]*3600) + ($time_parts[2]*60) + $time_parts[3] ; 
    return $seconds;
}

function secondToTime($time){
    $seconds  = $time % 60;
    $seconds<10 ? "0".$seconds : $seconds;
    if($seconds<10) {
        $seconds="0".$seconds;
    }
    $time     = ($time - $seconds) / 60;
    $minutes  = $time % 60;
    if($minutes<10) {
        $minutes="0".$minutes;
    }
    $time     = ($time - $minutes) / 60;
    $hours    = $time % 24;
    if($hours<10) {
        $hours="0".$hours;
    }
    $days     = ($time - $hours) / 24;
    if($days<10) {
        $days="0".$days;
    }

    $time_arr = array($days,$hours,$minutes,$seconds);
    return implode(":",$time_arr);
}
|improve this answer|||||
0

Well I needed something that would reduce seconds into hours minutes and seconds, but would exceed 24 hours, and not reduce further down into days.

Here is a simple function that works. You can probably improve it... But here it is:

function formatSeconds($seconds)
{
    $hours = 0;$minutes = 0;
    while($seconds >= 60){$seconds -= 60;$minutes++;}
    while($minutes >= 60){$minutes -=60;$hours++;}
    $hours = str_pad($hours, 2, '0', STR_PAD_LEFT);
    $minutes = str_pad($minutes, 2, '0', STR_PAD_LEFT);
    $seconds = str_pad($seconds, 2, '0', STR_PAD_LEFT);
    return $hours.":".$minutes.":".$seconds;
}
|improve this answer|||||
0
$given = 685;

 /*
 * In case $given == 86400, gmdate( "H" ) will convert it into '00' i.e. midnight.
 * We would need to take this into consideration, and so we will first
 * check the ratio of the seconds i.e. $given:$number_of_sec_in_a_day
 * and then after multiplying it by the number of hours in a day (24), we
 * will just use "floor" to get the number of hours as the rest would
 * be the minutes and seconds anyways.
 *
 * We can also have minutes and seconds combined in one variable,
 * e.g. $min_sec = gmdate( "i:s", $given );
 * But for versatility sake, I have taken them separately.
 */

$hours = ( $given > 86399 ) ? '0'.floor( ( $given / 86400 ) * 24 )-gmdate( "H", $given ) : gmdate("H", $given );

$min = gmdate( "i", $given );

$sec = gmdate( "s", $given );

echo $formatted_string = $hours.':'.$min.':'.$sec;

To convert it into a function:

function getHoursFormat( $given ){

 $hours = ( $given > 86399 ) ? '0'.floor( ( $given / 86400 ) * 24 )-gmdate( "H", $given ) : gmdate("H", $given );

 $min = gmdate( "i", $given );

 $sec = gmdate( "s", $given );

 $formatted_string = $hours.':'.$min.':'.$sec;

 return $formatted_string;

}
|improve this answer|||||
0

If you need to do that in javascript, you can do it in just one line of code as answered here Convert seconds to HH-MM-SS with JavaScript. Replace SECONDS with what you want to convert.

var time = new Date(SECONDS * 1000).toISOString().substr(11, 8);
|improve this answer|||||
0

If you want to create a audio/video duration string like YouTube, etc. you can do:

($seconds >= 60) ? ltrim(gmdate("H:i:s", $seconds), ":0") : gmdate("0:s", $seconds)

Will return strings like:

55.55 => '0:55'
100   => '1:40'

Probably won't work well for time >= 24 hours.

|improve this answer|||||
0

This is a pretty way to do that:

function time_converter($sec_time, $format='h:m:s'){
      $hour = intval($sec_time / 3600) >= 10 ? intval($sec_time / 3600) : '0'.intval($sec_time / 3600);
      $minute = intval(($sec_time % 3600) / 60) >= 10 ? intval(($sec_time % 3600) / 60) : '0'.intval(($sec_time % 3600) / 60);
      $sec = intval(($sec_time % 3600) % 60)  >= 10 ? intval(($sec_time % 3600) % 60) : '0'.intval(($sec_time % 3600) % 60);

      $format = str_replace('h', $hour, $format);
      $format = str_replace('m', $minute, $format);
      $format = str_replace('s', $sec, $format);

      return $format;
    }
|improve this answer|||||
-1

Just in case anyone else is looking for a simple function to return this nicely formatted (I know it is not the format the OP asked for), this is what I've just come up with. Thanks to @mughal for the code this was based on.

function format_timer_result($time_in_seconds){
    $time_in_seconds = ceil($time_in_seconds);

    // Check for 0
    if ($time_in_seconds == 0){
        return 'Less than a second';
    }

    // Days
    $days = floor($time_in_seconds / (60 * 60 * 24));
    $time_in_seconds -= $days * (60 * 60 * 24);

    // Hours
    $hours = floor($time_in_seconds / (60 * 60));
    $time_in_seconds -= $hours * (60 * 60);

    // Minutes
    $minutes = floor($time_in_seconds / 60);
    $time_in_seconds -= $minutes * 60;

    // Seconds
    $seconds = floor($time_in_seconds);

    // Format for return
    $return = '';
    if ($days > 0){
        $return .= $days . ' day' . ($days == 1 ? '' : 's'). ' ';
    }
    if ($hours > 0){
        $return .= $hours . ' hour' . ($hours == 1 ? '' : 's') . ' ';
    }
    if ($minutes > 0){
        $return .= $minutes . ' minute' . ($minutes == 1 ? '' : 's') . ' ';
    }
    if ($seconds > 0){
        $return .= $seconds . ' second' . ($seconds == 1 ? '' : 's') . ' ';
    }
    $return = trim($return);

    return $return;
}
|improve this answer|||||
-1

Anyone whose looking for this in the future, this gives the format the initial poster asked for.

$init = 685;
$hours = floor($init / 3600);
$hrlength=strlen($hours);
if ($hrlength==1) {$hrs="0".$hours;}
else {$hrs=$hours;} 

$minutes = floor(($init / 60) % 60);
$minlength=strlen($minutes);
if ($minlength==1) {$mins="0".$minutes;}
else {$mins=$minutes;} 

$seconds = $init % 60;
$seclength=strlen($seconds);
if ($seclength==1) {$secs="0".$seconds;}
else {$secs=$seconds;} 

echo "$hrs:$mins:$secs";
|improve this answer|||||
-3
<?php
$time=3*3600 + 30*60;


$year=floor($time/(365*24*60*60));
$time-=$year*(365*24*60*60);

$month=floor($time/(30*24*60*60));
$time-=$month*(30*24*60*60);

$day=floor($time/(24*60*60));
$time-=$day*(24*60*60);

$hour=floor($time/(60*60));
$time-=$hour*(60*60);

$minute=floor($time/(60));
$time-=$minute*(60);

$second=floor($time);
$time-=$second;
if($year>0){
    echo $year." year, ";
}
if($month>0){
    echo $month." month, ";
}
if($day>0){
    echo $day." day, ";
}
if($hour>0){
    echo $hour." hour, ";
}
if($minute>0){
    echo $minute." minute, ";
}
if($second>0){
    echo $second." second, ";
}
|improve this answer|||||

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