-1

I've got what I think is a straightforward bit of code - I want to add 3 strings to a QStringList. Here's my code:

baseName = "qwerty";
QStringList *newBOMList;

for (auto ii = 0; ii <= 2; ii++)
{
    if (ii == 0) {
      newBOMList->append(baseName);
    }else
    if (ii == 1) {
      newBOMList->append("A");
    }else
    if (ii == 2) {
      newBOMList->append(baseName + " description");
    }
}

I get a compiler warning on the first append line:

'newBOMList' may be used uninitialized in this function [-Wmaybe-uninitialized] newBOMList->append(baseName);

but not either of the other two.

This bit of code is in a method of a class.

I do like to at least understand the warnings if not get rid of them in my projects, but I don't really understand why this one occurs.

Any clues, please?

Also, is this the best way to add 3 strings to a QStringList?

Oh - I'm using qt-creator on a linux box - if that makes any difference.

  • You forgot to allocate memory for the pointer. – Victor Polevoy Jul 30 '15 at 14:14
5

You created a pointer to a QStringList, but never actually created the object, so the pointer is not initialised.

QStringList *newBOMList; //pointer to nowhere, results in error/warning on use
QStringList *newBOMList = new QStringList(); //now you have an actual instance, remember to clear it up with "delete newBOMList "
QStringList newBOMList; //stack/local instance, no need to deallocate

If you need a dynamically allocated one, Id strongly advise looking into std::unique_ptr, std::shared_ptr, and similar to manage the memory for you. They take care of deallocating the memory that was allocated without an explicit delete p.

e.g. editing your origenal code, these would be options:

//local/auto allocated
baseName = "qwerty";
QStringList localBOMList;

for (auto ii = 0; ii <= 2; ii++)
{
    if (ii == 0) {
      localBOMList.append(baseName);
    }else
    if (ii == 1) {
      localBOMList.append("A");
    }else
    if (ii == 2) {
      localBOMList.append(baseName + " description");
    }
}

//dynamically allocated, but will be destroyed as soon as the unique_ptr object is so no need for "delete newBOMList" to prevent a memory leak
baseName = "qwerty";
std::unique_ptr<QStringList> newBOMList(new QStringList());

for (auto ii = 0; ii <= 2; ii++)
{
    if (ii == 0) {
      newBOMList->append(baseName);
    }else
    if (ii == 1) {
      newBOMList->append("A");
    }else
    if (ii == 2) {
      newBOMList->append(baseName + " description");
    }
}
  • thanks ... it makes perfect sense now. And thanks for the extra explanation. – Michael Vincent Jul 30 '15 at 14:28
1

QStringList *newBOMList; creates a pointer to a QStringList. It does not construct one nor does it allocate any memory for it. When you go to use it you are invoking undefined behavior as you are using an uninitialized pointer.

If you need to crate a pointer to a object use a smart pointer instead of a raw one. You could use a std::unique_ptr

std::unique_ptr<QStringList> newBOMList = std::make_unique<QStringList>();

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