113

I am a little confused about how this code works:

fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2, ncols=2)
plt.show()

How does the fig, axes work in this case? What does it do?

Also why wouldn't this work to do the same thing:

fig = plt.figure()
axes = fig.subplots(nrows=2, ncols=2)
153

There are several ways to do it. The subplots method creates the figure along with the subplots that are then stored in the ax array. For example:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

x = range(10)
y = range(10)

fig, ax = plt.subplots(nrows=2, ncols=2)

for row in ax:
    for col in row:
        col.plot(x, y)

plt.show()

enter image description here

However, something like this will also work, it's not so "clean" though since you are creating a figure with subplots and then add on top of them:

fig = plt.figure()

plt.subplot(2, 2, 1)
plt.plot(x, y)

plt.subplot(2, 2, 2)
plt.plot(x, y)

plt.subplot(2, 2, 3)
plt.plot(x, y)

plt.subplot(2, 2, 4)
plt.plot(x, y)

plt.show()

enter image description here

  • 4
    Instead of plot(x, y) I have my plot coming from a user defined function, which creates a graph with networkx. How to use it? – Sigur Dec 19 '17 at 0:03
  • Is it possible to produce multiple subplots without a for-loop? E.g. some vectorized solution to plotting multiple columns of data on separate plots? This is very simple with ggplot in R, but seems impossible with Python. – user2739472 May 10 at 14:25
  • 1
    you can reduce the two for loops into one by axn = ax.flatten() and then for axes in axn: axes.plot(x,y) – wander95 Jul 17 at 19:17
32
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

fig, ax = plt.subplots(2, 2)

ax[0, 0].plot(range(10), 'r') #row=0, col=0
ax[1, 0].plot(range(10), 'b') #row=1, col=0
ax[0, 1].plot(range(10), 'g') #row=0, col=1
ax[1, 1].plot(range(10), 'k') #row=1, col=1
plt.show()

enter image description here

  • 1
    I get what ax is, but not what is fig. What are they? – Leevo Aug 6 at 9:25
  • 1
    ax is actually a numpy array. fig is matplotlib.figure.Figure class through which you can do a lot of manipulation to the plotted figure. for example, you can add colorbar to specific subplot, you can change the background color behind all subplots. you can modify the layout of these subplots or add a new small ax to them. preferably you might want a single main title for all subplots which can be obtained through fig.suptitle(title) method. finally once you are happy with the plot, you can save it using fig.savefig method. @Leevo – Khalil Al Hooti Aug 6 at 9:43
14
  • You can also unpack the axes in the subplots call

  • And set whether you want to share the x and y axes between the subplots

Like this:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
fig, ((ax1, ax2), (ax3, ax4)) = plt.subplots(nrows=2, ncols=2, sharex=True, sharey=True)
ax1.plot(range(10), 'r')
ax2.plot(range(10), 'b')
ax3.plot(range(10), 'g')
ax4.plot(range(10), 'k')
plt.show()

enter image description here

10

read the documentation: matplotlib.pyplot.subplots

pyplot.subplots() returns a tuple fig, ax which is unpacked in two variables using the notation

fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2, ncols=2)

the code

fig = plt.figure()
axes = fig.subplots(nrows=2, ncols=2)

does not work because subplots()is a function in pyplot not a member of the object Figure.

9

You might be interested in the fact that as of matplotlib version 2.1 the second code from the question works fine as well.

From the change log:

Figure class now has subplots method The Figure class now has a subplots() method which behaves the same as pyplot.subplots() but on an existing figure.

Example:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

fig = plt.figure()
axes = fig.subplots(nrows=2, ncols=2)

plt.show()
  • I get : AttributeError Traceback (most recent call last) <ipython-input-168-ed25aa5255fa> in <module>() 2 3 fig = plt.figure() ----> 4 axes = fig.subplots(nrows=2, ncols=2) AttributeError: 'Figure' object has no attribute 'subplots' – Ludo Schmidt Mar 28 '18 at 8:49
  • 1
    @LudoSchmidt The answer says "as of matplotlib version 2.1..." – ImportanceOfBeingErnest Mar 28 '18 at 8:52

protected by Sheldore Apr 29 at 10:44

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