I'll be the first to admit that my overall knowledge of low level programming is a bit sparse. I understand many of the core concepts but I do not use them on a regular basis. That being said I was absolutely astounded at how much code was needed for dtoa.c.

For the past couple months I have been working on an ECMAScript implementation in C# and I've been slowing filling in the holes in my engine. Last night I started working on Number.prototype.toString which is described in section 15.7.4.2 of the ECMAScript specification (pdf). In section 9.8.1, NOTE 3 offers a link to dtoa.c but I was looking for a challenge so I waited to view it. The following is what I came up with.

private IDynamic ToString(Engine engine, Args args)
{
    var thisBinding = engine.Context.ThisBinding;
    if (!(thisBinding is NumberObject) && !(thisBinding is NumberPrimitive))
    {
        throw RuntimeError.TypeError("The current 'this' must be a number or a number object.");
    }

    var num = thisBinding.ToNumberPrimitive();

    if (double.IsNaN(num))
    {
        return new StringPrimitive("NaN");
    }
    else if (double.IsPositiveInfinity(num))
    {
        return new StringPrimitive("Infinity");
    }
    else if (double.IsNegativeInfinity(num))
    {
        return new StringPrimitive("-Infinity");
    }

    var radix = !args[0].IsUndefined ? args[0].ToNumberPrimitive().Value : 10D;

    if (radix < 2D || radix > 36D)
    {
        throw RuntimeError.RangeError("The parameter [radix] must be between 2 and 36.");
    }
    else if (radix == 10D)
    {
        return num.ToStringPrimitive();
    }

    var sb = new StringBuilder();
    var isNegative = false;

    if (num < 0D)
    {
        isNegative = true;
        num = -num;
    }

    var integralPart = Math.Truncate(num);
    var decimalPart = (double)((decimal)num.Value - (decimal)integralPart);
    var radixChars = RadixMap.GetArray((int)radix);

    if (integralPart == 0D)
    {
        sb.Append('0');
    }
    else
    {
        var integralTemp = integralPart;
        while (integralTemp > 0)
        {
            sb.Append(radixChars[(int)(integralTemp % radix)]);
            integralTemp = Math.Truncate(integralTemp / radix);
        }
    }

    var count = sb.Length - 1;
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
    {
        var k = count - i;
        var swap = sb[i];
        sb[i] = sb[k];
        sb[k] = swap;
    }

    if (isNegative)
    {
        sb.Insert(0, '-');
    }

    if (decimalPart == 0D)
    {
        return new StringPrimitive(sb.ToString());
    }

    var runningValue = 0D;
    var decimalIndex = 1D;
    var decimalTemp = decimalPart;

    sb.Append('.');
    while (decimalIndex < 100 && decimalPart - runningValue > 1.0e-50)
    {
        var result = decimalTemp * radix;
        var integralResult = Math.Truncate(result);
        runningValue += integralResult / Math.Pow(radix, decimalIndex++);
        decimalTemp = result - integralResult;
        sb.Append(radixChars[(int)integralResult]);
    }

    return new StringPrimitive(sb.ToString());
}

Can anyone with more experience in low level programming explain why dtoa.c has roughly 40 times as much code? I just cannot imagine C# being that much more productive.

  • 1
    Why can't you imagine it? That kind of differential is exactly why languages like C# are so popular. – anon Jul 3 '10 at 22:39
  • @Neil - I guess it isn't that hard to imagine. I should have realized how much work goes into making native code cross-platform. – ChaosPandion Jul 3 '10 at 22:45
  • 1
    Have you tested this code with negative inputs? – Mark Dickinson Jul 4 '10 at 8:37
  • 1
    @Mark - Well I'll be damned, there was a bug with negative numbers. Nice catch. – ChaosPandion Jul 4 '10 at 16:19
  • 1
    I also suspect that (1.3333333333333333).toString(3) doesn't give 1.1 with your implementation... – sth Jul 4 '10 at 17:19
up vote 38 down vote accepted

dtoa.c contains two main functions: dtoa(), which converts a double to string, and strtod(), which converts a string to a double. It also contains a lot of support functions, most of which are for its own implementation of arbitrary-precision arithmetic. dtoa.c's claim to fame is getting these conversions right, and that can only be done, in general, with arbitrary-precision arithmetic. It also has code to round conversions correctly in four different rounding modes.

Your code only tries to implement the equivalent of dtoa(), and since it uses floating-point to do its conversions, will not always get them right. (Update: see my article http://www.exploringbinary.com/quick-and-dirty-floating-point-to-decimal-conversion/ for details.)

(I've written a lot about this on my blog, http://www.exploringbinary.com/ . Six of my last seven articles have been about strtod() conversions alone. Read through them to see how complicated it is to do correctly rounded conversions.)

  • Very interesting, I have some reading to do and I will definitely need to explore this code in greater detail. – ChaosPandion Jul 4 '10 at 1:51
  • It really isn't hard to believe that I would miss the "both-ways" conversion seen in this file. The code is really hard for me to read. – ChaosPandion Jul 4 '10 at 1:54
  • 6
    +1. Not to mention that Gay's dtoa (which is the smaller of the two pieces of functionality in dtoa.c) also allows the user to specify how many digits of output, and what rounding method to use. Put bluntly, the C# code in the question does a tiny fraction of what dtoa.c does, and does it inaccurately, slowly, and buggily (try it with negative numbers, for example). – Mark Dickinson Jul 4 '10 at 8:42
  • 1
    @Ed Swangren - Way to sound like a pompous jerk, I asked the question to be educated not to pump up my ego. – ChaosPandion Aug 18 '10 at 0:55
  • 2
    Wow, WAY too much conversation here. You guys should have done this in chat. – unixman83 Feb 13 '12 at 10:16

Producing good results for conversions between decimal and binary floating point representations is a rather difficult problem.

The major source of difficulty is that many decimal fractions, even simple ones, cannot be accurately expressed using binary floating point -- for example, 0.5 can (obviously), but 0.1 cannot. And, going the other way (from binary to decimal), you generally don't want the absolutely accurate result (for example, the accurate decimal value of the closest number to 0.1 which can be represented in an IEEE-754-compliant double is actually 0.1000000000000000055511151231257827021181583404541015625) so you normally want some rounding.

So, conversion often involves approximation. Good conversion routines guarantee to produce the closest possible approximation within particular (word size or number of digits) constraints. This is where most of the complexity comes from.

Take a look at the paper cited in comment at the top of the dtoa.c implementation, Clinger's How to Read Floating Point Numbers Accurately, for a flavour of the problem; and perhaps David M. Gay (the author)'s paper, Correctly Rounded Binary-Decimal and Decimal-Binary Conversions.

(Also, more generally: What Every Computer Scientist Should Know About Floating Point Arithmetic.)

  • I am well aware of the challenges that floating-point represents. My question has more to do with the difference in the amount of code. When I was testing my example against Firefox my code produced identical results. Firefox does use dtoa.c. – ChaosPandion Jul 4 '10 at 0:03
  • "many of the values expressible by a binary floating point representation cannot be written as a terminating decimal expansion" values such as? – curiousguy Jun 27 '12 at 13:46
  • @curiousguy: You're right, that appears to be rubbish. I'm not sure where that came from - it was 2 years ago - but I've edited the answer now. Thanks for drawing my attention to it. – Matthew Slattery Jun 27 '12 at 20:39

Based on a quick glance at it, a fair amount of the C version is dealing with multiple platforms and such as it looks like this file is meant to be generically usable across compilers (C & C++), bitnesses, floating point implementations, and platforms; with tons of #define configurability.

  • 1
    I Agree. I also had a short look at the code, I felt sick of the work it represents for such a simple operation. With .NET I see these times fortunately behind us for application programming. – jdehaan Jul 3 '10 at 22:45
  • 1
    Wouldn't it just be easier to have an archive of c files with each supporting a separate platform? Reading all those #ifdef blocks gave me a brain aneurysm... – ChaosPandion Jul 3 '10 at 22:49
  • Yeah, the problem isn't the languages, it's just an awkward design overall. The same effect could be achieved with better modularity. – Cogwheel Jul 3 '10 at 23:15
  • 3
    @ChaosPandion: depends whether you want your platform-specific configuration to be done in a C header file (setting the defines), or in a makefile (selecting the right .c file to build). Also, if there are enough defines to give you an aneurysm, that could be 2^aneurysm distinct c files if all the possibilities were multiplied out. In practice, when writing this kind of ultra-portable stuff you usually want a small number of source files (in this case 1, but sometimes a few more) driven by a large number of configuration options, rather than the other way around. – Steve Jessop Jul 4 '10 at 1:01
  • ... and the reason you might want to write the code to support platforms based on their behaviour / properties, rather than writing exactly one dtoa implementation for each platform, is so that you can port to new platforms just by writing a header file with the right combination of defines, rather than re-writing all of stdlib every time. A massively-configurable implementation like this isn't always the best, but it may not be as bad as it looks when you consider the alternative. – Steve Jessop Jul 4 '10 at 1:03

I think also that the code in dtoa.c might be more efficient (independent of language). For example, it seems to be doing some bit-fiddling, which in the hands of an expert often means speed. I assume it simply uses a less intuitive algorithm for speed reasons.

  • 2
    A lot of C library functions (and C library extensions) are written like this. It makes sense, because they are generally not updated, edited, or otherwise maintained very frequently, but they are called all over the place from vast numbers of programs. It only makes sense to make them as fast as possible even at the expense of some maintainability. – Tyler McHenry Jul 3 '10 at 23:19

Short answer: because dtoa.c works.

This is exactly the difference between well-debugged product and a NIH prototype.

  • 1
    What does NIH mean? – ChaosPandion Jul 4 '10 at 19:41
  • 2
    "Not invented here" as in "custom ad-hok code, as an alternative to popular 3rd party code" – Pavel Radzivilovsky Jul 4 '10 at 19:52
  • 2
    I mean you are right but it explains nothing as to why there is so much code. Who knows maybe someone else wrote an implementation that correctly converted with half as much code and twice as much functionality. – ChaosPandion Jul 4 '10 at 19:57

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