6

I was looking at an example and I saw this:

char *str;

/* ... */

if (!str || !*str) {
    return str;
}

Does it mean it's empty or something?

6
  • 3
    In C, !x is equivlent to x == 0, always
    – M.M
    Commented Jul 31, 2015 at 4:00
  • 1
    This is a check, whether str points to anything, and whether than thing is not a null character.
    – dtech
    Commented Jul 31, 2015 at 4:01
  • I've seen this example before. This code comes from the subroutine char* segfault_maybe(void).
    – geometrian
    Commented Jul 31, 2015 at 4:01
  • @imallett I see. I assume that OP has just provided char *str; to show the original definition of str and in the 'real code' there is some stuff in between
    – M.M
    Commented Jul 31, 2015 at 4:06
  • Sorry about my char *str. Yeah I just want to show that str is a normal string. The is some stuff in my actual code.
    – PTN
    Commented Jul 31, 2015 at 4:09

4 Answers 4

6

str is a char pointer. ! negates it. Basically, !str will evaluate to true (1) when str == NULL.

The second part is saying, (if str points to something) evaluate to true (1) if the first character is a null char ('\0') - meaning it's an empty string.

Note:
*str dereferences the pointer and retrieves the first character. This is the same as doing str[0].

6
  • 1
    ! converts it to a Boolean value, then negates the Boolean. Commented Jul 31, 2015 at 3:54
  • You mean str == NULL, not *str == NULL . And *str is a char, not a pointer.
    – M.M
    Commented Jul 31, 2015 at 3:55
  • @MattMcNabb Yes, my mistake.
    – pushkin
    Commented Jul 31, 2015 at 3:57
  • @Pushkin "char pointer" and "char" are different. str is a char pointer, *str is a char.
    – M.M
    Commented Jul 31, 2015 at 3:59
  • @MattMcNabb Oh of course. That was silly. When I wrote it, *str didn't mean dereferencing a pointer, but char *str. I wasn't clear.
    – pushkin
    Commented Jul 31, 2015 at 4:01
4

!str means that there is no memory allocated to str. !*str means that str points to an empty string.

9
  • str = malloc( 42 ); free( str ); assert( ! str ); /* fails */ Commented Jul 31, 2015 at 3:55
  • 1
    @Potatoswatter Evaluating str in your the last expression causes undefined behaviour, therefore !str is moot. IOW If !str is evaluated without UB having been triggered, then it's equivalent to testing whether str points to allocated memory (or one past the end)
    – M.M
    Commented Jul 31, 2015 at 3:57
  • @MattMcNabb Could you let me know what UB means? I don't know that acronym.
    – Ely
    Commented Jul 31, 2015 at 4:08
  • 1
    @MattMcNabb Thanks. So, in fact, an implementation could implement free as a function-like macro (§7.1.4) which assigns NULL to its argument, using the latitude that the value is indeterminate. (This would require some magic to distinguish lvalues, but it would be conforming.) My assertion would not fire. Commented Jul 31, 2015 at 4:15
  • 2
    @unxnut I assume you mean "!str evaluating true means there is no memory allocated to str". We were pointing out a caveat (that your answer possibly should mention) that if str is a dangling pointer (and therefore does not point to allocated memory), then !str causes undefined behaviour; so the program may appear to run as if !str evaluated true.
    – M.M
    Commented Jul 31, 2015 at 4:17
2

Before asking you can do small tests.

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    char *str = "test";
    printf("%d\n",*str);
    printf("%c\n",*str); // str[0]
    printf("%d\n",str);
    if (!str || !*str)
    {
        printf("%s",str);
    }

    return 0;
}

meaning of ! is negation. Except 0 every value is true for if condition. Here, str and *str return values that are not 0. So, you can make an inference.

0

The first expression !str evaluates true if str is set to NULL, and false if set to anything else regardless of whether the memory pointed to is still allocated or not. This can lead to undefined behavior if str is left set to memory that is no longer active.

The second expression !*str evaluates true if the value at the address in str is \0 (null character), but is not evaluated at all if !str evaluated true due to the short-circuiting action of the boolean OR operator.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.