22

I have a some json data where there is a field called lastModifed contains time in millis. I wanted to convert this data into a struct type with json.UnMarshaller. I have mapped the field with json filed. But the conversion seems not working.

IE :

My Json looks like this:

{
   "name" : "hello",
   "lastModified" : 1438167001716
}

and struct Looks like

type Model struct {
    Name         string    `json:"name"`
    Lastmodified time.Time `json:"lastModified"`
}

looks not converting the time properly. how can i get the time from those millis??

NB: The millis of lastModifiedTime are getting from java System.currentTimeMillis();

1
  • 1
    The question has lots of tangential content.
    – golopot
    Aug 12, 2020 at 10:42

3 Answers 3

42

In golang time.Time marshals to JSON using RFC3339, string representation. So you need to unmarshal your json using int64 instead of time.Time and convert after it by yourself:

type Model struct {
    Name   string `json:"name"`
    Millis int64  `json:"lastModified"`
}

func (m Model) Lastmodified() time.Time {
    return time.Unix(0, m.Millis * int64(time.Millisecond))
}

Go playground

Also you can use special wrapper above time.Time and override UnmarshalJSON there:

type Model struct {
    Name         string   `json:"name"`
    Lastmodified javaTime `json:"lastModified"`
}

type javaTime time.Time

func (j *javaTime) UnmarshalJSON(data []byte) error {
    millis, err := strconv.ParseInt(string(data), 10, 64)
    if err != nil {
        return err
    }
    *j = javaTime(time.Unix(0, millis * int64(time.Millisecond)))
    return nil
}

Go playground

4
  • 9
    I think time.Unix(0, millis * int64(time.Mllisecond)) is a little more readable. time.Unix is explicitly documented as handling such inputs correctly without requiring callers to split nanosecond values in seconds first.
    – Dave C
    Jul 31, 2015 at 16:31
  • Yes, you are right. I've edited my answer. Thank you very much!
    – RoninDev
    Jul 31, 2015 at 17:01
  • 2
    N.B. this has an implicit validity restriction to the years 1678 to 2261 CE. That's fine for most cases but should at least be noted, as the less readable solution does not have such a restriction.
    – kbolino
    Sep 30, 2019 at 19:44
  • I've got 3000 year and got bug.
    – VadimFilin
    Apr 19, 2021 at 14:06
6

You can use the UnixMilli method in time:

myTime := time.UnixMilli(myMilliseconds)

Reference: https://pkg.go.dev/time#UnixMilli

4

Try this:

func ParseMilliTimestamp(tm int64) time.Time {
    sec := tm / 1000
    msec := tm % 1000
    return time.Unix(sec, msec*int64(time.Millisecond))
}

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