240

I am using rabbitmq and a simple python sample from here together with docker-compose. My problem is that I need to wait for rabbitmq to fully started. From what I searched so far, I don't know how to wait with container x ( in my case worker ) until y (rabbitmq) is started.

I found this blogpost where he checks if the other host is online. I also found this docker command:

wait

Usage: docker wait CONTAINER [CONTAINER...]

Block until a container stops, then print its exit code.

Waiting for a container to stop is maybe not what I am looking for but if it is, is it possible to use that command inside the docker-compose.yml ? My solution so far is to wait some seconds and check the port, but is this the way to achieve this?. If I don't wait I get an error.

docker-compose.yml

worker:
    build: myapp/.
    volumes:
    - myapp/.:/usr/src/app:ro

    links:
    - rabbitmq
rabbitmq:
    image: rabbitmq:3-management

python hello sample (rabbit.py):

import pika
import time

import socket

pingcounter = 0
isreachable = False
while isreachable is False and pingcounter < 5:
    s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
    try:
        s.connect(('rabbitmq', 5672))
        isreachable = True
    except socket.error as e:
        time.sleep(2)
        pingcounter += 1
    s.close()

if isreachable:
    connection = pika.BlockingConnection(pika.ConnectionParameters(
            host="rabbitmq"))
    channel = connection.channel()

    channel.queue_declare(queue='hello')

    channel.basic_publish(exchange='',
                          routing_key='hello',
                          body='Hello World!')
    print (" [x] Sent 'Hello World!'")
    connection.close()

Dockerfile for worker:

FROM python:2-onbuild
RUN ["pip", "install", "pika"]

CMD ["python","rabbit.py"]

Update Nov 2015:

A shell script or waiting inside your program is maybe a possible solution. But after seeing this Issue I am looking for a command or feature of docker/docker-compose itself.

They mention a solution for implementing a health check, which may be the best option. A open tcp connection does not mean your service is ready or may remain ready. In addition to that I need to change my entrypoint in my dockerfile.

So I am hoping for an answer with docker-compose on board commands, which will hopefully the case if they finish this issue.

Update March 2016

There is a proposal for providing a built-in way to determine if a container is "alive". So docker-compose can maybe make use of it in near future.

Update June 2016

It seems that the healthcheck will be integrated into docker in Version 1.12.0

Update January 2017

I found a docker-compose solution see: Docker Compose wait for container X before starting Y

  • 2
    Using healthchecks in has been deprecated in docker-compose 2.3 to encourage making distributed systems fault tolerant. See: docs.docker.com/compose/startup-order – Kmaid Jul 11 '17 at 15:29
  • as pointed out in the answer, but thanks ... – svenhornberg Jul 12 '17 at 6:16

14 Answers 14

213

Finally found a solution with a docker-compose method. Since docker-compose file format 2.1 you can define healthchecks.

I did it in a example project you need to install at least docker 1.12.0+. I also needed to extend the rabbitmq-management Dockerfile, because curl isn't installed on the official image.

Now I test if the management page of the rabbitmq-container is available. If curl finishes with exitcode 0 the container app (python pika) will be started and publish a message to hello queue. Its now working (output).

docker-compose (version 2.1):

version: '2.1'

services:
  app:
    build: app/.
    depends_on:
      rabbit:
        condition: service_healthy
    links: 
        - rabbit

  rabbit:
    build: rabbitmq/.
    ports: 
        - "15672:15672"
        - "5672:5672"
    healthcheck:
        test: ["CMD", "curl", "-f", "http://localhost:15672"]
        interval: 30s
        timeout: 10s
        retries: 5

output:

rabbit_1  | =INFO REPORT==== 25-Jan-2017::14:44:21 ===
rabbit_1  | closing AMQP connection <0.718.0> (172.18.0.3:36590 -> 172.18.0.2:5672)
app_1     |  [x] Sent 'Hello World!'
healthcheckcompose_app_1 exited with code 0

Dockerfile (rabbitmq + curl):

FROM rabbitmq:3-management
RUN apt-get update
RUN apt-get install -y curl 
EXPOSE 4369 5671 5672 25672 15671 15672

Version 3 no longer supports the condition form of depends_on. So i moved from depends_on to restart on-failure. Now my app container will restart 2-3 times until it is working, but it is still a docker-compose feature without overwriting the entrypoint.

docker-compose (version 3):

version: "3"

services:

  rabbitmq: # login guest:guest
    image: rabbitmq:management
    ports:
    - "4369:4369"
    - "5671:5671"
    - "5672:5672"
    - "25672:25672"
    - "15671:15671"
    - "15672:15672"
    healthcheck:
        test: ["CMD", "curl", "-f", "http://localhost:15672"]
        interval: 30s
        timeout: 10s
        retries: 5

  app:
    build: ./app/
    environment:
      - HOSTNAMERABBIT=rabbitmq
    restart: on-failure
    depends_on:
      - rabbitmq
    links: 
        - rabbitmq
  • 6
    @svenhornberg ping uses ICMP so doesn't support TCP ports. Maybe nc to test a TCP port. Probably better to use psql -h localhost -p 5432 and query something. – Matt Feb 13 '17 at 5:14
  • 33
    "depends on" has been removed in version 3 docs.docker.com/compose/compose-file/#dependson – nha Apr 3 '17 at 11:08
  • 4
    I think the main reason is, that an application itself should always be able to wait or recovery if others services are not available (look for resilience in micro service context) – svenhornberg Apr 20 '17 at 8:33
  • 35
    @nha It looks like the condition form of depends_on is removed, but depends_on itself is still around in v3 – akivajgordon Jul 26 '17 at 20:25
  • 9
    How can healthchecks still be used to control startup order if depends_on with condition has been removed? – Franz Aug 31 '17 at 15:49
69

Natively that is not possible, yet. See also this feature request.

So far you need to do that in your containers CMD to wait until all required services are there.

In the Dockerfiles CMD you could refer to your own start script that wraps starting up your container service. Before you start it, you wait for a depending one like:

Dockerfile

FROM python:2-onbuild
RUN ["pip", "install", "pika"]
ADD start.sh /start.sh
CMD ["/start.sh"]

start.sh

#!/bin/bash
while ! nc -z rabbitmq 5672; do sleep 3; done
python rabbit.py

Probably you need to install netcat in your Dockerfile as well. I do not know what is pre-installed on the python image.

There are a few tools out there that provide easy to use waiting logic, for simple tcp port checks:

For more complex waits:

  • Could you explain what you mean by CMD ? Does this mean my programm has to do it, like i did it with a port check ? Or do you mean a specific CMD from e.g. linux for this ? – svenhornberg Jul 31 '15 at 22:56
  • thank you for explaining, I upvote your answer.But I think the upcoming feature request, would be the right answer to my question so I leave it unanswered so far. – svenhornberg Aug 1 '15 at 9:27
35

Using restart: unless-stopped or restart: always may solve this problem.

If worker container stops when rabbitMQ is not ready, it will be restarted until it is.

  • 3
    I like this solution for this case, but it doesn't work for containers that don't exit when one of the subprocesses that it runs fails. For example, a Tomcat container would continue to run even if a Java servlet that it ran were to fail to connect to a database server. Granted, Docker containers render servlet containers like Tomcat mostly unnecessary. – Derek Mahar May 6 '16 at 1:50
  • @DerekMahar, if you have a Java-based web application that only serves REST calls, what do you use instead of Jetty/Tomcat? – JoeG Dec 21 '16 at 19:31
  • 2
    @JoeG, I meant Tomcat the servlet container that can host many applications, not embedded Tomcat. Docker renders the former mostly unnecessary, while making the latter more popular for microservices, for example. – Derek Mahar Dec 21 '16 at 20:11
28

Quite recently they've added the depends_on feature.

Edit:

As of compose version 2.1+ you can use depends_on in conjunction with healthcheck to achieve this:

From the docs:

version: '2.1'
services:
  web:
    build: .
    depends_on:
      db:
        condition: service_healthy
      redis:
        condition: service_started
  redis:
    image: redis
  db:
    image: redis
    healthcheck:
      test: "exit 0"

Before version 2.1

You can still use depends_on, but it only effects the order in which services are started - not if they are ready before the dependant service is started.

It seems to require at least version 1.6.0.

Usage would look something like this:

version: '2'
services:
  web:
    build: .
    depends_on:
      - db
      - redis
  redis:
    image: redis
  db:
    image: postgres 

From the docs:

Express dependency between services, which has two effects:

  • docker-compose up will start services in dependency order. In the following example, db and redis will be started before web.
  • docker-compose up SERVICE will automatically include SERVICE’s dependencies. In the following example, docker-compose up web will also create and start db and redis.

Note: As I understand it, although this does set the order in which containers are loaded. It does not guarantee that the service inside the container has actually loaded.

For example, you postgres container might be up. But the postgres service itself might still be initializing within the container.

  • 9
    dnephin wrote: depends_on is only ordering. To actually delay the starting of another container there would need to be some way to detect when a process has finished initializing itself. – svenhornberg Mar 1 '16 at 7:15
  • 11
    "Version 3 no longer supports the condition form of depends_on." docs.docker.com/compose/compose-file/#dependson – akauppi Apr 12 '17 at 14:30
  • depends_on doesn't wait until the container is in ready state(whatever that can mean in your case). It only waits until the container is in 'running' state. – htyagi Aug 31 '17 at 13:20
14

you can also just add it to the command option eg.

command: bash -c "sleep 5; start.sh"

https://github.com/docker/compose/issues/374#issuecomment-156546513

to wait on a port you can also use something like this

command: bash -c "while ! curl -s rabbitmq:5672 > /dev/null; do echo waiting for xxx; sleep 3; done; start.sh"

to increment the waiting time you can hack a bit more:

command: bash -c "for i in {1..100} ; do if ! curl -s rabbitmq:5672 > /dev/null ; then echo waiting on rabbitmq for $i seconds; sleep $i; fi; done; start.sh"
9

For container start ordering use

depends_on:

For waiting previous container start use script

entrypoint: ./wait-for-it.sh db:5432

This article will help you https://docs.docker.com/compose/startup-order/

7

restart: on-failure did the trick for me..see below

---
version: '2.1'
services:
  consumer:
    image: golang:alpine
    volumes:
      - ./:/go/src/srv-consumer
    working_dir: /go/src/srv-consumer
    environment:
      AMQP_DSN: "amqp://guest:guest@rabbitmq:5672"
    command: go run cmd/main.go
    links:
          - rabbitmq
    restart: on-failure

  rabbitmq:
    image: rabbitmq:3.7-management-alpine
    ports:
      - "15672:15672"
      - "5672:5672"
6

You can also solve this by setting an endpoint which waits for the service to be up by using netcat (using the docker-wait script). I like this approach as you still have a clean command section in your docker-compose.yml and you don't need to add docker specific code to your application:

version: '2'
services:
  db:
    image: postgres
  django:
    build: .
    command: python manage.py runserver 0.0.0.0:8000
    entrypoint: ./docker-entrypoint.sh db 5432
    volumes:
      - .:/code
    ports:
      - "8000:8000"
    depends_on:
      - db

Then your docker-entrypoint.sh:

#!/bin/sh

postgres_host=$1
postgres_port=$2
shift 2
cmd="$@"

# wait for the postgres docker to be running
while ! nc $postgres_host $postgres_port; do
  >&2 echo "Postgres is unavailable - sleeping"
  sleep 1
done

>&2 echo "Postgres is up - executing command"

# run the command
exec $cmd

This is nowadays documented in the official docker documentation.

PS: You should install netcat in your docker instance if this is not available. To do so add this to your Docker file :

RUN apt-get update && apt-get install netcat-openbsd -y 
4

There is a ready to use utility called "docker-wait" that can be used for waiting.

  • 1
    Thank you, but it is only a shell script so it is like h3nrik answer or waiting inside python. It is not a feature of docker-compose itself. May you have a look in github.com/docker/compose/issues/374 they plan to implement a healthcheck which would be the best way. A open tcp connection does not mean your service is ready or may remain ready. In addition to that I need to change my entrypoint in my dockerfile. – svenhornberg Nov 11 '15 at 14:48
2

basing on this blog post https://8thlight.com/blog/dariusz-pasciak/2016/10/17/docker-compose-wait-for-dependencies.html

I configured my docker-compose.yml as shown below:

version: "3.1"

services:
  rabbitmq:
    image: rabbitmq:3.7.2-management-alpine
    restart: always
    environment:
      RABBITMQ_HIPE_COMPILE: 1
      RABBITMQ_MANAGEMENT: 1
      RABBITMQ_VM_MEMORY_HIGH_WATERMARK: 0.2
      RABBITMQ_DEFAULT_USER: "rabbitmq"
      RABBITMQ_DEFAULT_PASS: "rabbitmq"
    ports:
      - "15672:15672"
      - "5672:5672"
    volumes:
      - data:/var/lib/rabbitmq:rw

  start_dependencies:
    image: alpine:latest
    links:
      - rabbitmq
    command: >
      /bin/sh -c "
        echo Waiting for rabbitmq service start...;
        while ! nc -z rabbitmq 5672;
        do
          sleep 1;
        done;
        echo Connected!;
      "

volumes:
  data: {}

Then I do for run =>:

docker-compose up start_dependencies

rabbitmq service will start in daemon mode, start_dependencies will finish the work.

  • lol, making query via "curl", "-f", "http://localhost:15672" for which u need to install management plugin and using healthcheck that already deprecated - its best answer. Simple working example with check via nc its - downvote. ha, ok... – Igor Komar Jan 12 '18 at 1:26
  • the answer does not use a native docker feature, its irrelevant if you use curl, nc or other tools. while! nc is the same as already posted in other answers. – svenhornberg Jan 12 '18 at 8:09
  • 1
  • i will upvote your link – svenhornberg Jan 12 '18 at 9:34
  • @IgorKomar, thanks man, you saved my day! :3 I used almost same mechanic to check mysql server is ready before actual application is started. ;) I am passing similar command to the docker-compose run --name app-test --rm "app" bash -l -c 'echo Waiting for mysql service start... && while ! nc -z db-server 3306; do sleep 1; done && echo Connected! && /bin/bash /script/ci_tests.sh' – TooroSan Oct 11 '18 at 0:49
1

Tried many different ways, but liked the simplicity of this: https://github.com/ufoscout/docker-compose-wait

The idea that you can use ENV vars in the docker compose file to submit a list of services hosts (with ports) which should be "awaited" like this: WAIT_HOSTS: postgres:5432, mysql:3306, mongo:27017.

So let's say you have the following docker-compose.yml file (copy/past from repo README):

version: "3"

services:

  mongo:
    image: mongo:3.4
    hostname: mongo
    ports:
      - "27017:27017"

  postgres:
    image: "postgres:9.4"
    hostname: postgres
    ports:
      - "5432:5432"

  mysql:
    image: "mysql:5.7"
    hostname: mysql
    ports:
      - "3306:3306"

  mySuperApp:
    image: "mySuperApp:latest"
    hostname: mySuperApp
    environment:
      WAIT_HOSTS: postgres:5432, mysql:3306, mongo:27017

Next, in order for services to wait, you need to add the following two lines to your Dockerfiles (into Dockerfile of the services which should await other services to start):

ADD https://github.com/ufoscout/docker-compose-wait/releases/download/2.5.0/wait /wait
RUN chmod +x /wait

The complete example of such sample Dockerfile (again from the project repo README):

FROM alpine

## Add your application to the docker image
ADD MySuperApp.sh /MySuperApp.sh

## Add the wait script to the image
ADD https://github.com/ufoscout/docker-compose-wait/releases/download/2.5.0/wait /wait
RUN chmod +x /wait

## Launch the wait tool and then your application
CMD /wait && /MySuperApp.sh

For other details about possible usage see README

  • I was looking for similiar answer. I've usually worked with hub.docker.com/r/dadarek/wait-for-dependencies as it uses netcat underneath. The one you've provided is Rust-based. Can't comment on the quality of yours, but for me no additional layers is a definite pro. – Filip Malczak Jun 15 at 11:00
0

One of the alternative solution is to use a container orchestration solution like Kubernetes. Kubernetes has support for init containers which run to completion before other containers can start. You can find an example here with SQL Server 2017 Linux container where API container uses init container to initialise a database

https://www.handsonarchitect.com/2018/08/understand-kubernetes-object-init.html

0

Here is the example where main container waits for worker when it start responding for pings:

version: '3'
services:
  main:
    image: bash
    depends_on:
     - worker
    command: bash -c "sleep 2 && until ping -qc1 worker; do sleep 1; done &>/dev/null"
    networks:
      intra:
        ipv4_address: 172.10.0.254
  worker:
    image: bash
    hostname: test01
    command: bash -c "ip route && sleep 10"
    networks:
      intra:
        ipv4_address: 172.10.0.11
networks:
  intra:
    driver: bridge
    ipam:
      config:
      - subnet: 172.10.0.0/24

However, the proper way is to use healthcheck (>=2.1).

0

Not recommended for serious deployments, but here is essentially a "wait x seconds" command.

With docker-compose version 3.4 a start_period instruction has been added to healthcheck. This means we can do the following:

docker-compose.yml:

version: "3.4"
services:
  # your server docker container
  zmq_server:
    build:
      context: ./server_router_router
      dockerfile: Dockerfile

  # container that has to wait
  zmq_client:
    build:
      context: ./client_dealer/
      dockerfile: Dockerfile
    depends_on:
      - zmq_server
    healthcheck:
      test: "sh status.sh"
      start_period: 5s

status.sh:

#!/bin/sh

exit 0

What happens here is that the healthcheck is invoked after 5 seconds. This calls the status.sh script, which always returns "No problem". We just made zmq_client container wait 5 seconds before starting!

Note: It's important that you have version: "3.4". If the .4 is not there, docker-compose complains.

  • As a naive "wait 5s" solution, this one's quite ingenious. I would upvote, but I won't because this doesn't really work with prod-like setups and I'm afraid that someone would look at number of votes instead reading carefully. Still, I wanted to say "man, that's smart" ;) – Filip Malczak Jun 15 at 10:56
  • PS. For more complicated solutions, see the Evereq's answer – Filip Malczak Jun 15 at 11:06

protected by cassiomolin Jan 16 at 0:18

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.