-2

As far as I know npm resolves module dependencies by allowing each module to require everything as a tree. This means that if module1 uses dependency1-v1.0, and module2 also uses this same dependency, they'll both download it, so we'd have a file structure like this:

/node_modules
    /module1
        /node_modules
            /dependency1-v1.0
            /dependency2-v0.9
    /module2
        /node_modules
            /dependency1-v1.0
            /dependency2-v0.9
    /module3
        /node_modules
            /dependency1-v1.2
            /dependency2-v0.9

Is there a node package manager which is smart enough to realize this and manage the dependencies in a common collection, which could look something like this?

/packages
    /module1
    /module2
    /module3
/dependencies
    /dependency1
        /v1.0
        /v1.2
    /dependency2
        /v0.9

It would be nice if it could perform garbage collection and remove unreferenced/unused dependencies, preferably automatically (e.g. npm rm).

Another thing I often see is that modules have tests and dev-dependencies which are only useful if one wants to make sure if a module is performing as expected, but I think usually this just wastes space, time and bandwidth.

Am I missing something? Is there a way to install node modules without having to have all these bloats?

Clarification

Yes, I'm aware that in modules one would just probably do something like this to load a dependency:

var dep1 = require('dependency1');

instead of also specifying its version here, which is defined in the package.json. However, I still think it should be possible to instead of just downloading everything into the module's own node_modules directory, this could be resolved either with symlinks or simple "facade" loader files which would be managed by the "smarter npm".

  • for websites use bower. otherwise it doesn't really matter, the files are small anyway. – webduvet Jul 31 '15 at 15:18
  • "Another thing I often see is that modules have tests and dev-dependencies which are only useful if one wants to make sure if a module is performing as expected, but I think usually this just wastes space, time and bandwidth." and they of course only install if your node env is dev. – Kevin B Jul 31 '15 at 15:19
  • @KevinB sure, while I'm developing my own thing, the environment would be dev, but do I really care about the dev dependencies of 3rd party modules? Hardly. – Wabbitseason Jul 31 '15 at 15:29
  • Write your own package manager. – Kevin B Jul 31 '15 at 15:29
  • 1
    @KevinB Perhaps I don't have to. Perhaps others have already figured this out. That's exactly why I have posted this question. :) – Wabbitseason Jul 31 '15 at 15:31
4

From the FAQ:

Why can't npm just put everything in one place, like other package managers?

Not every change is an improvement, but every improvement is a change. This would be like asking git to do network IO for every commit. It's not going to happen, because it's a terrible idea that causes more problems than it solves.

It is much harder to avoid dependency conflicts without nesting dependencies. This is fundamental to the way that npm works, and has proven to be an extremely successful approach. See npm-folders(5) for more details.

If you want a package to be installed in one place, and have all your programs reference the same copy of it, then use the npm link command. That's what it's for. Install it globally, then link it into each program that uses it.

.

Whatever, I really want the old style 'everything global' style.

Write your own package manager. You could probably even wrap up npm in a shell script if you really wanted to.

npm will not help you do something that is known to be a bad idea.


If even after all of that you still want this feature, go to the npm git and submit a feature request, SO isn't the place for npm feature requests.

Though, it seems we may be seeing some improvements to this in npm@3:

Your dependencies will now be installed maximally flat. Insofar as is possible, all of your dependencies, and their dependencies, and THEIR dependencies will be installed in your project's node_modules folder with no nesting. You'll only see modules nested underneath one another when two (or more) modules have conflicting dependencies.

| improve this answer | |
  • I find it humorous that the change they're making in @3 was considered to be a known bad idea previously by npm. – Kevin B Jul 31 '15 at 16:04

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.