Running this test:

@Test
public void testSystemCurrentTimeMillis() {
    new NonStrictExpectations(System.class) {{
        System.currentTimeMillis(); result = 1438357206679L;
    }};
    long currentTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    assertEquals(1438357206679L, currentTime);
}

I get an IllegalStateException:

java.lang.IllegalStateException: Missing invocation to mocked type at this point; please make sure such invocations appear only after the declaration of a suitable mock field or parameter
    at unittests.DateTest$1.(DateTest.java:24)
    at unittests.DateTest.testSystemCurrentTimeMillis(DateTest.java:23)

What's wrong with my Test (JMockit 1.18)?

  • What is result ? can you please share the entire class code. Also what is NonStrictExpectations ??? can you share the code for that too. – StackFlowed Jul 31 '15 at 15:53
  • NonStrictExpectations is a JMockit class. result is used for JMockit mocking. jmockit.org/tutorial/Mocking.html#expectation – trunkc Jul 31 '15 at 15:56
  • I always use org.joda.time.DateTimeUtils to get current time DateTimeUtils.currentTimeMillis() and in unit test DateTimeUtils.setCurrentMillisFixed(longValue) at the end DateTimeUtils.setCurrentMillisSystem() – StackFlowed Jul 31 '15 at 16:04
  • See stackoverflow.com/questions/17229525/… – Raedwald Jul 31 '15 at 17:14
  • I wanna do it with JMockit. – trunkc Jul 31 '15 at 18:25
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Like so many things with JMockit, it's easy enough to do. Try this..

@Test
public void testSystemCurrentTimeMillis(@Mocked final System unused) {
    new NonStrictExpectations() {{
        System.currentTimeMillis(); result = 1438357206679L;
    }};
    long currentTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    assertEquals(1438357206679L, currentTime);
}

Found this site to be an excellent reference, by the way. Probably you were tripped up by the static method. All you need to do is declare the class with the static method as mocked--you never need to refer to the variable, hence I named it "unused".

  • Accepted your answer, but I only wanted to mock the method currentTimeMillis(), not the whole System class. Seems to be a bug in JMockit. – trunkc Aug 3 '15 at 8:44
  • 1
    @trunkc It's not a bug, but a limitation of the "partial mocking" feature: it cannot handle native methods like System.currentTimeMillis(). This limitation, however, only applies to the Expectations API; you can mock only the desired native method by creating a MockUp<System> (which uses the Mockups API). – Rogério Aug 3 '15 at 15:37
  • You should add a hint about this limitation in the tutorial. – trunkc Aug 4 '15 at 10:05

My final solution is to create a MockUp for System, that only mocks the method currentTimeMillis():

private static class SystemMock extends MockUp<System> {
    @Mock
    public static long currentTimeMillis() {
        return 10000000L;
    }
}

@Test
public void testAddNowDate() {
    new SystemMock();
    long currentTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    assertEquals(10000000L, currentTime);
}
  • Yes, this is the best solution in this case. That said, you should try to avoid mocking the system clock whenever possible; the need to mock it in a test hints at a design issue in the code under test. – Rogério Aug 3 '15 at 15:41
  • @Rogério care to elaborate? How can I test functionality that depends on the system clock without mocking it? – KidCrippler Jan 11 '17 at 16:18
  • Code that needs the current time should use a higher-level type (java.util.Date, java.time.LocalDate, etc.), not currentTimeMillis(). And then it should allow for date/time objects to be passed in from client code, rather than always obtaining the current time. Unless, of course, you really need the current system clock time in milli/nano-seconds. As I said, calling System.currentTimeMillis() is quite possibly a design issue, but I can't know for sure without more information. – Rogério Jan 12 '17 at 14:26

This thing has been introduced in JMockit version 1.17 only to use object reference with your NonStrictExpectation(){} block,Deprecated attribute value for Mocked

Deprecated the "value" attribute of @Mocked, which is used for "static" partial mocking. Existing uses should be replaced with "dynamic" partial mocking, by passing the instance or class to partially mock in a call to the Expectations(Object...) constructor, or by applying a MockUp class.

Please refer the below link: JMockit version history

  • I don't use the value attribute of @Mocked. – trunkc Aug 3 '15 at 8:19

Yeah this is partial mocking. With small correction in the nonStrictExpectation(){} your above mentioned code can also get fix:

@Mocked
private System system;

new NonStrictExpectations() {{
    System.currentTimeMillis(); 
    result = 1438357206679L;
}};

long currentTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
assertEquals(1438357206679L, currentTime);

This should also work.

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