59

I am putting together an R Markdown HTML page for some new R users at my work to give them an introduction and walk them through some simple demos.

While showing off things like head and tail, it ends up looking messy and long because it prints out each output one after the other. I would like them as long as other sections of my .Rmd to be split into two columns.

In my research, I came across this question. There was some discussion of workarounds with HTML code I did not understand.

I did try including:

<div class="columns-2">   
</div>

from the official rmarkdown documentation, but it did not have any effect.

As I was ready to give up, there was a comment on the Stack Overflow question by @Molx saying that you can separate columns with ***, but it did not give any further explanation. I tried it out in a few ways: I included the *** in the middle of my R code chunk, I separated my R code chunks and put the *** between the two. When I did the latter, the *** simply became a horizontal rule and did nothing with columns.

I am hoping to avoid tables and CSS if possible.

3
  • Doing this via CSS3 columns is probably going to be the best long-term solution, perhaps coupled with custom knitr output code to generate appropriately classed HTML objects that the CSS can be applied to. – Gavin Simpson Jul 31 '15 at 19:45
  • either of those would work so it would be nice to see what you've done to see why they are not working – rawr Jul 31 '15 at 20:05
  • flexdashboard from the htmlwidgets makes this task trivial ! ps (sorry to add to the jungle of packages, but it helped me to generate quite decent columns in 15 mins) – markcelo Dec 4 '17 at 9:51
74

rmarkdown file:

#### Put in your css file or directly in rmarkdown

<style>
  .col2 {
    columns: 2 200px;         /* number of columns and width in pixels*/
    -webkit-columns: 2 200px; /* chrome, safari */
    -moz-columns: 2 200px;    /* firefox */
  }
  .col3 {
    columns: 3 100px;
    -webkit-columns: 3 100px;
    -moz-columns: 3 100px;
  }
</style>

#### This section will have three columns

<div class="col3">
**1** one  
**2** two  
**3** three  
**4** four  
**5** five  
**6** six  
**7** seven  
**8** eight  
**9** nine  
</div>

#### This section will have two columns

<div class="col2">
```{r}
head(mtcars)
tail(mtcars)
```
</div>

Gives me this

enter image description here


Edit

To be more precise with the column elements, you can use a div for each set of elements:

Rmd file

<style>
.column-left{
  float: left;
  width: 33%;
  text-align: left;
}
.column-center{
  display: inline-block;
  width: 33%;
  text-align: center;
}
.column-right{
  float: right;
  width: 33%;
  text-align: right;
}
</style>

#### This section will have three columns

<div class="column-left">
**1** one  
**2** two  
</div>
<div class="column-center">
**3** three  
**4** four  
**5** five  
**6** six  
</div>
<div class="column-right">
**7** seven  
**8** eight  
**9** nine  
</div>

Gives me

enter image description here

7
  • This answer was super helpful. I now realize my mindset was completely off. I had completely forgotten how CSS worked. I assumed the class "columns-2" that the rmarkdown documentation mentioned was an established class and I didn't have to actually write any CSS. Your solution is great! I am still curious if anyone has any more info on the *** solution as well. – bryanR Aug 3 '15 at 15:32
  • How does it chooses to go to the next column? Is there a way to specify for instance that 1 and 2 are in the first column, then 3,4,5,6 in the second? – RockScience Nov 18 '16 at 4:51
  • @RockScience <div style="float: left; width: 33%;"> **1** one **2** two </div> <div style="float: left; width: 33%;"> **3** three **4** four **5** five **6** six </div> <div style="float: right; width: 33%;"> **7** seven **8** eight **9** nine </div> with new lines instead of white space – rawr Nov 18 '16 at 18:32
  • 2
    @RockScience updated with a better solution for your question – rawr Mar 21 '17 at 16:32
  • @rawr very helpful answer! I'm wondering how would you put header sections inside of the divs? I have put header sections into your divs, but the next header section I try to put in the document starts out on the right side when it should be on the left, like a normal section – nate Sep 12 '18 at 22:23
25

The custom css solution from rawr is good, but there is another way if you would like even more customisation and avoid explicit css entirely. Since markdown uses Bootstrap-layout we can use Bootstraps grid layout for in-detail-styling:

The only drawback are a couple of html-tags extra

Example:

---
title: "test"
author: "Testperson"
output:
  html_document
---

```{r setup, include=FALSE}
knitr::opts_chunk$set(echo = TRUE)
```

## R Markdown

This is an R Markdown document. Markdown is a simple formatting syntax for authoring HTML, PDF, and MS Word documents. For more details on using R Markdown see <http://rmarkdown.rstudio.com>.

When you click the **Knit** button a document will be generated that includes both content as well as the output of any embedded R code chunks within the document. You can embed an R code chunk like this:

<div class = "row">
<div class = "col-md-6">
```{r cars,  warning = FALSE, echo = FALSE, dev=c('svg')}
plot(pressure)
```
</div>
<div class = "col-md-6">
```{r pressure, warning = FALSE, echo=FALSE, dev=c('svg')}
plot(pressure)
```
</div>
</div>
5
  • 1
    @JanStanstrup no that's correct, since it's html and bootstrap, for pdf there are other ways – ErrantBard Oct 19 '16 at 5:45
  • 1
    This one worked for me. The answer selected as correct works, but when I open the html document in a browser like google chrome, the output appears in one colum layout. Thanks!! – Johan Rosa Sep 10 '19 at 16:04
  • @ErrantBard which are the other ways for pdf? – Laura Oct 5 '19 at 3:02
  • @Laura Check the documentation! This question might help(it concerns numbering in pdf-docs): stackoverflow.com/questions/42852069/… – ErrantBard Oct 14 '19 at 6:56
  • @Laura The way I would try this in LaTeX (which is a prerequisite for PDF documents from Rmarkdown) is with the paracol package. In paracol, the \switchcolumn command will come in handy. I recommend using an asterisk * each time you want to start a new row. – thymaro Dec 26 '20 at 12:22
20

Update (May 2020)

Pandoc now supports a fenced_div approach for specifying environments. This is also the approach that the R Markdown Cookbook recommends for multi-column environments, with some special tweaks to the preamble files.

I've updated my original linked example (below) to reflect this best practice... but I've also packaged an R Markdown template that bundles together the necessary preamble files. A MWE with this fenced div approach might look like this:

---
title: "Two column test"
output:
  html_document:
    css: preamble.css
  pdf_document:
    includes:
      in_header: preamble.tex
---

This is regular text spanning the whole page. But here comes a two-column section.

:::::: {.columns}
::: {.column width="48%" data-latex="{0.48\textwidth}"}
This text is in the left column.
:::
::: {.column width="4%" data-latex="{0.04\textwidth}"}
\ 
<!-- an empty Div (with a white space), serving as
a column separator -->
:::
:::::: {.column width="48%" data-latex="{0.48\textwidth}"}
This text is in the right column.
:::
::::::
\newline

And back to a regular single-column environment.

Original answer

A late contribution to this thread, but just to point out that you can combine @rawr and @Alison's answers to enable multicolumn sections for both HTML and PDF. R Markdown/knitr is smart enough to parse only the relevant commands depending on the desired output format. I'm often knitting the same document to multiple formats, so this is very convenient. Here is a fully developed example.

1
  • @GregorThomas Done. – Grant May 19 '20 at 4:45
16

If you are exporting to pdf you can do this in the header with includes.

Without using css files I have created a two-column environment using the following.

1st: I created the file header.tex. header.tex includes the following statements:

\usepackage{multicol}
\newcommand{\btwocol}{\begin{multicols}{2}}
\newcommand{\etwocol}{\end{multicols}}

2nd: I put the following command into my document header

---
title: "My title"
author: "My name"
date: "Today"
output:
    beamer_presentation:
        highlight: haddock
    includes:
        in_header: header.tex
        keep_tex: yes
---

Here is an example of the body and a picture of the output with two columns.

***********
\btwocol
```{r, results="asis"}
print("test")
```

Here is some text that also is in two column environment.
\etwocol

Now only one column

And here is what the slide looks like: enter image description here

2
  • 2
    Could you show how to make this output a pdf? I cannot get it to work. – Jan Stanstrup Oct 18 '16 at 13:57
  • Is that all you need in header.tex? Or are there additional lines required? – John Paul Nov 3 '17 at 15:28
5

The CSS solution for creating multiple columns doesn't allow for controlling where the column breaks occur. It appears that column breaks are inserted automatically to distribute content evenly between the columns, which isn't always what you may want.
The "***" symbols in markdown and rmarkdown insert a horizontal line break, not a new column.

Besides the .Rmd format for slide presentations, Rstudio also provides a .Rpres slide presentation format (Rpresentations). Rpresentations use a slightly different flavor of markdown, where the "***" symbols insert a new column.

Below are links to an introduction to Rpresentations by RStudio:
Two Column Layouts
Authoring R Presentations

Below are links to StackOverflow questions similar to yours:
Two Column Layouts in RStudio
Two Column Layouts in markdown

The biggest drawback of the Rpresentation format is that it doesn't support embedded shiny applications for interactive visualizations. But Rpresentation does support interactive webgl plots. Below is a simple example. You can save it into an .Rpres file, open it in RStudio, and compile it into an HTML slide presentation. Note the interactive webgl plot in the last slide, that you can manipulate with your mouse.

Simple R Presentation
========================================================
title: "Simple R Presentation"
author: John Doe
date: `r format(Sys.time(), "%m/%d/%Y")`
width: 1900
height: 1000
```{r setup, include=FALSE}
# This is an R setup chunk, containing default options applied to all other chunks
library(knitr)
# This sets the chunk default options
opts_chunk$set(cache=TRUE, collapse=TRUE, error=FALSE, prompt=TRUE)
# This sets the chunk display theme
thm <- knit_theme$get("acid")
knit_theme$set(thm)
# This sets some display options
options(digits=3)
options(width=80)
```


My First Slide
========================================================
Hello World!  
Creating Rpresentations isn't difficult at all!  

<img src="https://community.filemaker.com/servlet/JiveServlet/showImage/2-180549-7694/staples-easy-button.png" width="500" height="500" />


***

The Cauchy-Schwarz Inequality:  

$$
\left( \sum_{k=1}^n a_k b_k \right)^2 
\leq 
\left( \sum_{k=1}^n a_k^2 \right) 
\left( \sum_{k=1}^n b_k^2 \right) 
$$



Slide With R Code Chunk and Output in Two Columns
========================================================

First column contains simple R code that returns the summary of the cars data frame:  
```{r, summ_cars, eval=FALSE, echo=TRUE, results="hold", size="tiny"}
summary(cars)
```
***
Second column contains the output of the code in the first column:  
```{r, summ_cars, eval=TRUE, echo=FALSE, size="tiny"}
```



Slide With Plot
========================================================

First column with R code:  
```{r, plot_cars, eval=TRUE, echo=(-(1:1)), fig.show="hide"}
par(cex.lab=1.5, cex.axis=1.5, cex.main=1.5, cex.sub=1.5)
plot(cars)
```

***

Second column with plot:  
```{r, plot_cars, eval=TRUE, echo=FALSE, fig.width=10, fig.height=8}
```



Slide with Interactive 3d Surface Plot
========================================================

First column with R code:  
```{r, rgl_surf3d, eval=FALSE, echo=TRUE, webgl=TRUE, fig.show="hide"}
library(rgl)  # load rgl
knit_hooks$set(webgl=hook_webgl)
# define function of two variables
foo <- function(x, y) y*sin(x)
# draw 3d surface plot of function
persp3d(x=foo, xlim=c(-5, 5), ylim=c(-5, 5), col="green", axes=FALSE)
```

***

Second column with plot:  
```{r, rgl_surf3d, eval=TRUE, echo=FALSE, webgl=TRUE, fig.width=10, fig.height=8}
```

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