31

Implement the builder pattern prior to Java 8 has lots of tedious, nearly duplicated code; the builder itself is typically boilerplate code. Some duplicate code detectors consider nearly each method of a pre-Java 8 builder as a copy of every other method.

Consider the following pre-Java 8 builder pattern:

public class Person {

    private String name;
    private int age;

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public int getAge() {
        return age;
    }

    public void setAge(int age) {
        this.age = age;
    }
}

public class PersonBuilder {
    
    private static class PersonState {
        public String name;
        public int age;
    }
    
    private PersonState  state = new PersonState();
    
    public PersonBuilder withName(String name) {
        state.name = name;
        return this;
    }
    
    public PersonBuilder withAge(int age) {
        state.age = age;
        return this;
    }
    
    public Person build() {
        Person person = new Person();
        person.setAge(state.age);
        person.setName(state.name);
        state = new PersonState();
        return person;
    }
}

How can the builder pattern be implemented using Java 8?

11
  • 4
    The builder pattern is mainly useful when you want to build immutable objects (i.e. your class does not have setters). If you have a mutable class, why would you want to use the builder pattern, instead of just calling setters?
    – Jesper
    Jul 31, 2015 at 20:40
  • 6
    @Jesper because you might have 9 optional parameters during construction and writing a constructor variation for every combination is either really ugly and tedious (9^2 combinations) or impossible (two params have same type)
    – bcorso
    Jul 31, 2015 at 20:44
  • 3
    Why not just call the setters then? You don't need a builder for mutable objects. There's no special reason why this would be useful for JPA entities (they work the same as POJOs) and calling builder methods or setter methods makes no difference, however many or few properties there are. You can set the properties via setters, you don't need constructors.
    – Jesper
    Jul 31, 2015 at 20:48
  • 5
    @Jesper, what if you need all parameters during the construction of an Object for it to be in a valid state. Using a builder ensures the Object has all of it's parameters before it can be used. Using setters alone, the Object would be in an invalid state between calls to setters.
    – bcorso
    Jul 31, 2015 at 20:49
  • 3
    @bcorso Thanks, I know the builder pattern. My point was that the application of the pattern as SpaceTrucker shows in his code above, if you take this code literally, doesn't add much to just creating an instance of Person and call setters on it.
    – Jesper
    Aug 1, 2015 at 5:23

6 Answers 6

93

The GenericBuilder

The idea for building mutable objects (immutable objects are addressed later on) is to use method references to setters of the instance that should be built. This leads us to a generic builder that is capable of building every POJO with a default constructor - one builder to rule them all ;-)

The implementation is this:

public class GenericBuilder<T> {

    private final Supplier<T> instantiator;

    private List<Consumer<T>> instanceModifiers = new ArrayList<>();

    public GenericBuilder(Supplier<T> instantiator) {
        this.instantiator = instantiator;
    }

    public static <T> GenericBuilder<T> of(Supplier<T> instantiator) {
        return new GenericBuilder<T>(instantiator);
    }

    public <U> GenericBuilder<T> with(BiConsumer<T, U> consumer, U value) {
        Consumer<T> c = instance -> consumer.accept(instance, value);
        instanceModifiers.add(c);
        return this;
    }

    public T build() {
        T value = instantiator.get();
        instanceModifiers.forEach(modifier -> modifier.accept(value));
        instanceModifiers.clear();
        return value;
    }
}

The builder is constructed with a supplier that creates new instances and then those instances are modified by the modifications specified with the with method.

The GenericBuilder would be used for Person like this:

Person value = GenericBuilder.of(Person::new)
            .with(Person::setName, "Otto").with(Person::setAge, 5).build();

Properties and further Usages

But there is more about that builder to discover.

For example, the above implementation clears the modifiers. This could be moved into its own method. Therefore, the builder would keep its state between modifications and it would be easy create multiple equal instances. Or, depending on the nature of an instanceModifier, a list of varying objects. For example, an instanceModifier could read its value from an increasing counter.

Continuing with this thought, we could implement a fork method that would return a new clone of the GenericBuilder instance that it is called on. This is easily possible because the state of the builder is just the instantiator and the list of instanceModifiers. From there on, both builders could be altered with some other instanceModifiers. They would share the same basis and have some additional state set on built instances.

The last point I consider especially helpful when needing heavy entities for unit or even integration tests in enterprise applications. There would be no god-object for entities, but for builders instead.

The GenericBuilder can also replace the need for different test value factories. In my current project, there are many factories used for creating test instances. The code is tightly coupled to different test scenarios and it is difficult to extract portions of a test factory for reuse in another test factory in a slightly different scenario. With the GenericBuilder, reusing this becomes much easier as there is only a specific list of instanceModifiers.

To verify that created instances are valid, the GenericBuilder could be initialized with a set of predicates, which are verified in the build method after all instanceModifiers are run.

public T build() {
    T value = instantiator.get();
    instanceModifiers.forEach(modifier -> modifier.accept(value));
    verifyPredicates(value);
    instanceModifiers.clear();
    return value;
}

private void verifyPredicates(T value) {
    List<Predicate<T>> violated = predicates.stream()
            .filter(e -> !e.test(value)).collect(Collectors.toList());
    if (!violated.isEmpty()) {
        throw new IllegalStateException(value.toString()
                + " violates predicates " + violated);
    }
}

Immutable object creation

To use the above scheme for the creation of immutable objects, extract the state of the immutable object into a mutable object and use the instantiator and builder to operate on the mutable state object. Then, add a function that will create a new immutable instance for the mutable state. However, this requires that the immutable object either has its state encapsulated like this or it be changed in that fashion (basically applying parameter object pattern to its constructor).

This is in some way different than a builder was used in pre-java-8 times. There, the builder itself was the mutable object that created a new instance at the end. Now, we have a separation of the state a builder keeps in a mutable object and the builder functionality itself.

In essence
Stop writing boilerplate builder patterns and get productive using the GenericBuilder.

14
  • 6
    Why would you want to use this instead of the shorter and much more straightforward: Person value = new Person(); person.setName("Otto"); persion.setAge(5);
    – Jesper
    Jul 31, 2015 at 20:43
  • 1
    @Jesper because I would like to create similiar objects for unit tests for example. I will explain a bit more. Jul 31, 2015 at 20:45
  • 1
    Yes, I can see that a builder would be useful if you'd want to build multiple objects with (partly) the same values.
    – Jesper
    Jul 31, 2015 at 20:53
  • 12
    But a builder is usually a mutable object used to create an immutable one (e.g. StringBuilder and String). This can't be used to create an immutable object because it requires setters. Since your Person class is mutable, there's no significant difference between a Person and a GenericBuilder<Person>. If you need a to create many similar Person objects, all you need is a copy constructor. Jul 31, 2015 at 20:53
  • 1
    I'll admit I like the look of GenericBuilder.of(Person::new).with(Person::setName, "Otto").with(Person::setAge, 5).build();, but I don't think you're really addressing the point that a Person is a builder (or it could be with a copy constructor). When you say, "extract the state of the immutable object into a mutable object", that's what I already do - the mutable object is called a builder object. Jul 31, 2015 at 21:22
10
public class PersonBuilder {
    public String salutation;
    public String firstName;
    public String middleName;
    public String lastName;
    public String suffix;
    public Address address;
    public boolean isFemale;
    public boolean isEmployed;
    public boolean isHomewOwner;

    public PersonBuilder with(
        Consumer<PersonBuilder> builderFunction) {
        builderFunction.accept(this);
        return this;
    }


    public Person createPerson() {
        return new Person(salutation, firstName, middleName,
                lastName, suffix, address, isFemale,
                isEmployed, isHomewOwner);
    }
}

Usage

Person person = new PersonBuilder()
    .with($ -> {
        $.salutation = "Mr.";
        $.firstName = "John";
        $.lastName = "Doe";
        $.isFemale = false;
    })
    .with($ -> $.isHomewOwner = true)
    .with($ -> {
        $.address =
            new PersonBuilder.AddressBuilder()
                .with($_address -> {
                    $_address.city = "Pune";
                    $_address.state = "MH";
                    $_address.pin = "411001";
                }).createAddress();
    })
    .createPerson();

Refer: https://medium.com/beingprofessional/think-functional-advanced-builder-pattern-using-lambda-284714b85ed5

Disclaimer: I am the author of the post

4
  • You should add to the post that you drew inspiration from groovy for this. The usage of $ as an identifier might be something one does need to get used to, if one wants to continue with that convention. Dec 1, 2017 at 6:33
  • With this implementation, both PersonBuiler and Person class are going have a lot of similar instance variables like "firstName", "lastName" etc.
    – Kinjal
    Apr 20, 2018 at 10:18
  • 1
    If we have checked exceptions, how we can handle them? May 22, 2018 at 12:48
  • how do I enforce one mandatory param, say name is mandatory ? Sep 19, 2020 at 20:55
9

You can check the lombok project

For your case

@Builder
public class Person {
    private String name;
    private int age;
}

It would generate the code on the fly

public class Person {
    private String name;
    private int age;
    public String getName(){...}
    public void setName(String name){...}
    public int getAge(){...}
    public void setAge(int age){...}
    public Person.Builder builder() {...}

    public static class Builder {
         public Builder withName(String name){...}
         public Builder withAge(int age){...}
         public Person build(){...}
    }        
}

Lombok do it on the compilation phase and is transparent for developers.

3
  • 2
    Although this is also a correct builder implementation in java 8, the question was specifically ment to get information on how to use features new to java 8 for the implementation of the builder pattern. Aug 2, 2015 at 12:47
  • Yes. You are right. I missed the requirement of using java8 features. Here is an builder example in my github - BuilderMonad, in which i used java8 lambda to implement a builder monad. The way to implement is very similar to your answer :)
    – popcorny
    Aug 2, 2015 at 23:12
  • Downvoted because Lombok and e.g. Jackson does not play well together. Stay clear of Lombok! See e.g. stackoverflow.com/questions/39381474/… Oct 11, 2018 at 10:50
5

We can use Consumer functional interface of Java 8 to avoid multiple getter/setter methods.

Refer the below-updated code with Consumer interface.

import java.util.function.Consumer;

public class Person {

    private String name;

    private int age;

    public Person(Builder Builder) {
        this.name = Builder.name;
        this.age = Builder.age;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        final StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder("Person{");
        sb.append("name='").append(name).append('\'');
        sb.append(", age=").append(age);
        sb.append('}');
        return sb.toString();
    }

    public static class Builder {

        public String name;
        public int age;

        public Builder with(Consumer<Builder> function) {
            function.accept(this);
            return this;
        }

        public Person build() {
            return new Person(this);
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Person user = new Person.Builder().with(userData -> {
            userData.name = "test";
            userData.age = 77;
        }).build();
        System.out.println(user);
    }
}

Refer the below link to know the detailed information with the different examples.

https://medium.com/beingprofessional/think-functional-advanced-builder-pattern-using-lambda-284714b85ed5

https://dkbalachandar.wordpress.com/2017/08/31/java-8-builder-pattern-with-consumer-interface/

4

Building upon this answer, here's a quasi-immutable version of the builder pattern:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.function.BiConsumer;
import java.util.function.Consumer;
import java.util.function.Function;
import java.util.function.Supplier;

/**
 * Responsible for constructing objects that would otherwise require
 * a long list of constructor parameters.
 *
 * @param <MT> The mutable definition for the type of object to build.
 * @param <IT> The immutable definition for the type of object to build.
 */
public class GenericBuilder<MT, IT> {
  /**
   * Provides the methods to use for setting object properties.
   */
  private final Supplier<MT> mMutable;

  /**
   * Calling {@link #build()} will instantiate the immutable instance using
   * the mutator.
   */
  private final Function<MT, IT> mImmutable;

  /**
   * Adds a modifier to call when building an instance.
   */
  private final List<Consumer<MT>> mModifiers = new ArrayList<>();

  /**
   * Constructs a new builder instance that is capable of populating values for
   * any type of object.
   *
   * @param mutator Provides methods to use for setting object properties.
   */
  protected GenericBuilder(
      final Supplier<MT> mutator, final Function<MT, IT> immutable ) {
    mMutable = mutator;
    mImmutable = immutable;
  }

  /**
   * Starting point for building an instance of a particular class.
   *
   * @param supplier Returns the instance to build.
   * @param <MT>     The type of class to build.
   * @return A new {@link GenericBuilder} capable of populating data for an
   * instance of the class provided by the {@link Supplier}.
   */
  public static <MT, IT> GenericBuilder<MT, IT> of(
      final Supplier<MT> supplier, final Function<MT, IT> immutable ) {
    return new GenericBuilder<>( supplier, immutable );
  }

  /**
   * Registers a new value with the builder.
   *
   * @param consumer Accepts a value to be set upon the built object.
   * @param value    The value to use when building.
   * @param <V>      The type of value used when building.
   * @return This {@link GenericBuilder} instance.
   */
  public <V> GenericBuilder<MT, IT> with(
      final BiConsumer<MT, V> consumer, final V value ) {
    mModifiers.add( instance -> consumer.accept( instance, value ) );
    return this;
  }

  /**
   * Instantiates then populates the immutable object to build.
   *
   * @return The newly built object.
   */
  public IT build() {
    final var value = mMutable.get();
    mModifiers.forEach( modifier -> modifier.accept( value ) );
    mModifiers.clear();
    return mImmutable.apply( value );
  }
}

Example usage:

final var caret = CaretPosition
    .builder()
    .with( CaretPosition.Mutator::setParagraph, 5 )
    .with( CaretPosition.Mutator::setMaxParagraph, 10 )
    .build();

When the mutator's reference is released, the state of the returned object is effectively immutable. The CaretPosition class resembles:

public class CaretPosition {
  public static GenericBuilder<CaretPosition.Mutator, CaretPosition> builder() {
    return GenericBuilder.of( CaretPosition.Mutator::new, CaretPosition::new );
  }

  public static class Mutator {
    private int mParagraph;
    private int mMaxParagraph;

    public void setParagraph( final int paragraph ) {
      mParagraph = paragraph;
    }

    public void setMaxParagraph( final int maxParagraph ) {
      mMaxParagraph = maxParagraph;
    }
  }

  private final Mutator mMutator;
  
  private CaretPosition( final Mutator mutator ) {
    mMutator = mutator;
  }

  // ...

From here, the CaretPosition can freely reference its internal Mutator instance, which handily provides the opportunity to avoid violating encapsulation by otherwise exposing get accessor methods on the immutable class without necessity.

This is only quasi-immutable because the values can be changed if a handle to the mutable instance is retained. Here's how immutability can be violated:

final var mutable = CaretPosition.builder()
    .with( CaretPosition.Mutator::setParagraph, 5 )
    .with( CaretPosition.Mutator::setMaxParagraph, 10 );
final var caret = mutable.build();
mutable.setParagraph( 17 );
System.out.println( "caret para: " + caret.toString() );

Should caret.toString() include the paragraph value, the resulting string will contain the value 17 instead of 5, thereby violating immutability. Another downside to this approach is that if validation is performed at build() time, the second call to setParagraph will not be passed through the validator.

Ways to avoid this include:

  • Immutable copy constructor. Copy the mutable member variables into the immutable instance, which entails duplicating all member variables.
  • Mutator copy constructor. Copy the Mutator into a new object reference, which avoids duplicating all member variables while building a truly immutable instance of the desired type.
  • Clone. Clone the mutator when constructing the immutable instance, which requires either implementing Serializable everywhere or using a deep-copy library.
  • Library. Scrap this solution for Project Lombok, AutoValue, or Immutables.

The Mutator copy constructor option would resemble:

private Mutator() {
}

private Mutator( final Mutator mutator) {
  mParagraph = mutator.mParagraph;
  mMaxParagraph = mutator.mMaxParagraph;
}

Then the change to CaretPosition is trivial---instantiate the Mutator using its copy constructor:

private CaretPosition( final Mutator mutator ) {
  mMutator = new Mutator( mutator );
}
3

I have recently tried to revisit the builder pattern in Java 8, and I am currently using the following approach:

public class Person {

    static public Person create(Consumer<PersonBuilder> buildingFunction) {
        return new Person().build(buildingFunction);
    }

    private String name;
    private int age;

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public int getAge() {
        return age;
    }

    private Person() {

    }

    private Person build(Consumer<PersonBuilder> buildingFunction) {
        buildingFunction.accept(new PersonBuilder() {

            @Override
            public PersonBuilder withName(String name) {
                Person.this.name = name;
                return this;
            }

            @Override
            public PersonBuilder withAge(int age) {
                Person.this.age = age;
                return this;
            }
        });

        if (name == null || name.isEmpty()) {
            throw new IllegalStateException("the name must not be null or empty");
        }

        if (age <= 0) {
            throw new IllegalStateException("the age must be > 0");
        }

        // check other invariants

        return this;
    }
}

public interface PersonBuilder {

    PersonBuilder withName(String name);

    PersonBuilder withAge(int age);
}

Usage:

var person = Person.create(
    personBuilder -> personBuilder.withName("John Smith").withAge(43)
);

Advantages:

  • A clean builder interface
  • Little to no boilerplate code
  • The builder is well encapsulated
  • It's easy to segregate the optional attributes from the mandatory attributes of the target class (the optional attributes are specified in the builder)
  • No setter needed in the target class (in DDD, you generally don't want setters)
  • Use of a static factory method to create an instance of the target class (instead of using the new keyword, so it's possible to have several static factory methods, each with a meaningful name)

Possible drawbacks:

  • The calling code can save a reference to the passed-in builder and later screw up the mounted instance, but who will do that?
  • If the calling code saves a reference to the passed-in builder, a memory leak can occur

Possible alternative:

We can setup a constructor with a building function, as follows:

public class Person {

    static public Person create(Consumer<PersonBuilder> buildingFunction) {
        return new Person(buildingFunction);
    }

    private String name;
    private int age;

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public int getAge() {
        return age;
    }

    private Person(Consumer<PersonBuilder> buildingFunction) {
        buildingFunction.accept(new PersonBuilder() {

            @Override
            public PersonBuilder withName(String name) {
                Person.this.name = name;
                return this;
            }

            @Override
            public PersonBuilder withAge(int age) {
                Person.this.age = age;
                return this;
            }
        });

        if (name == null || name.isEmpty()) {
            throw new IllegalStateException("the name must not be null or empty");
        }

        if (age <= 0) {
            throw new IllegalStateException("the age must be > 0");
        }

        // check other invariants
    }
}

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