2

I'm building authorization in my app and have three roles:

  • User
  • Moderator
  • Admin

What's the best way to represent this in Rails? I've thought about adding the following boolean fields to my user's table:

  • is_user
  • is_moderator
  • is_admin

And then creating is_user?, etc functions in the User model.

A user can have multiple roles (can be all three).

5
7

I suggest to use bitwise values for your access levels. This is valid because you have a limited number of roles and because your users can have several roles at once.

It is way much faster and easier to maintain than to use an external gem.

The idea is to use a numeric value for each access level, which can be accumulated at the bit level.

Level     | Int val | Bit val
user      |       1 | 00000001
moderator |       2 | 00000010
admin     |       4 | 00000100
another   |       8 | 00001000
etc ...   |      16 | 00010000

So a user and a moderator would have a access level of 1 + 2 = 3 (bit 00000011). Then we can test for the bit values to define the user access_level


1) Add a access_level column in your user model, of type integer and default 0

2) Set constants to define your access level values

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  USER = 1
  MODERATOR = 2
  ADMIN = 4
end

3) Create the add_access_level and remove_access_level methods

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  # Add the desired bit
  def add_access_level(level)
    self.access_level |= level
  end
  # Removed the desired bit
  def remove_access_level(level)
    self.access_level &= ~level
  end
end

Note: Up to you to persist those changes in the database

4) Create the is_user?, is_moderator? and is_admin? methods

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  def is_user?
    is_access_level? USER
  end
  def is_moderator?
    is_access_level? MODERATOR
  end
  def is_admin?
    is_access_level? ADMIN
  end

  private
    def is_access_level?(level)
      self.access_level & level == level
    end
end

Note: I would be using method_missing, but this is out of our scope here.

5) Test it

u = User.new

u.is_admin?
=> false
u.is_moderator?
=> false
u.is_user?
=> false

u.add_access_level User::USER
u.add_access_level User::MODERATOR

u.is_admin?
=> false
u.is_moderator?
=> true
u.is_user?
=> true

u.remove_access_level User::MODERATOR

u.is_admin?
=> false
u.is_moderator?
=> false
u.is_user?
=> true
1
  • What is this sorcery! That's amazing. Thanks! – Jacob Aug 3 '15 at 5:12
1

I like the accepted answer, but I just want to share my dumb way of doing it...

I mean I can get my head around using the bitwise method, but numerical values always consume my human memory (what this number is supposed to be? which role has this number? how the calculation is done using these binary bits? etc...)

So I would prefer a more readable way... here is my solution, inspired by the accepted answer (thanks to the author):

Note: I'm assuming you have a string column roles in your users table (I think PostgreSQL has a datatype array but for some cases like this one I prefer to use a simple string column)

class User < ApplicationRecord
  
  ALLOWED_ROLES = ['user', 'moderator', 'admin']
  
  def get_roles
    current_roles = self.roles || '' # to prevent nil value returned
    current_roles.split(',')
  end
  
  def add_role(role)
    roles_arr = self.get_roles
    roles_arr << role unless roles_arr.include?(role)
    # clean up any other role that doesn't exist anymore in the allowed roles
    roles_arr = roles_arr.reject { |item| !ALLOWED_ROLES.include? item }
    self.roles = roles_arr.join(',')
  end
  
  def remove_role(role)
    roles_arr = self.get_roles
    roles_arr.delete(role)
    self.roles = roles_arr.join(',')
  end
  
  def has_role?(role)
    self.get_roles.include?(role)
  end

end

Now you can do things like:

user = User.first
user.add_role('admin')
user.has_role?('admin')
# => true

user.has_role?('moderator')
# => false
user.add_role('moderator')
user.has_role?('moderator')
# => true

user.get_roles
# => ["admin", "moderator"]

Also, note that these methods are just intended to manipulate the field in the memory, you still have to call user.save to persist the changes into your database.

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