18

I have a class that uses the command pattern to do a bunch of simple transformation steps in order. Data comes in as a data feed (in XML) and then is transformed through multiple steps using single-purpose step classes. So it might look like this (actual class names are different):

raw_data = Downloader.new(feed)
parsed_data = Parser.new(raw_data)
translated_data = Translator.new(parsed_data)
sifted_data = Sifter.new(translated_data)
collate_data = Collator.new(sifted_data)

etc.

I have unit tests for each class, and I have integration tests to verify the full flow, including that each class is called.

But I don't have any way to test the order they are called

I'd like some test so I can know: the Downloader is called first, then the Parser, then the Translator, etc.

This is in Ruby with Rspec 3.

I did find this: http://testpractices.blogspot.com/2008/07/ordered-method-testing-with-rspec.html but this is from 2008 and it's also really ugly. Is there a better way to test method execution order?

Thanks!

2
  • Isn't the test for the end result? Aug 1, 2015 at 14:09
  • Yes, and normally I'd agree that this kind of test isn't critical to validate the method under test, but it got me curious for one, and for two, I think it's still useful when the order is important.
    – Dan Sharp
    Aug 1, 2015 at 18:45

3 Answers 3

22

RSpec Mocks provides ordered since at least RSpec 3.0:

You can use ordered to constrain the order of multiple message expectations. This is not generally recommended because in most situations the order doesn't matter and using ordered would make your spec brittle, but it's occasionally useful. When you use ordered, the example will only pass if the messages are received in the declared order.

Note that RSpec agrees with @spickermann that this is not a recommended practice. However, there are some cases when it is necessary, especially when dealing with legacy code.

Here is RSpec's passing example:

RSpec.describe "Constraining order" do
  it "passes when the messages are received in declared order" do
    collaborator_1 = double("Collaborator 1")
    collaborator_2 = double("Collaborator 2")

    expect(collaborator_1).to receive(:step_1).ordered
    expect(collaborator_2).to receive(:step_2).ordered
    expect(collaborator_1).to receive(:step_3).ordered

    collaborator_1.step_1
    collaborator_2.step_2
    collaborator_1.step_3
  end
end

And failing examples:

RSpec.describe "Constraining order" do
  it "fails when messages are received out of order on one collaborator" do
    collaborator_1 = double("Collaborator 1")

    expect(collaborator_1).to receive(:step_1).ordered
    expect(collaborator_1).to receive(:step_2).ordered

    collaborator_1.step_2
    collaborator_1.step_1
  end

  it "fails when messages are received out of order between collaborators" do
    collaborator_1 = double("Collaborator 1")
    collaborator_2 = double("Collaborator 2")

    expect(collaborator_1).to receive(:step_1).ordered
    expect(collaborator_2).to receive(:step_2).ordered

    collaborator_2.step_2
    collaborator_1.step_1
  end
end
0
2

I would argue that the order of method calls is not important and should not be tested. Important is the result of a method, not its internals. Testing the order of internal method calls (instead of just the result of the tested method) will make it harder to refactor a method later on.

But if still want to test the order then you might want to test that the methods are called with a mocked result of the methods called before:

let(:raw_data)    { double(:raw_data) }
let(:parsed_data) { double(:parsed_data) }
# ...

before do
  allow(Downloader).to_receive(:new).and_return(raw_data)
  allow(Parser).to_receive(:new).and_return(parsed_data)
  # ...
end

it 'calls method in the right order' do
  foo.bar # the method you want to test

  expect(Downloader).to have_received(:new).with(feed)
  expect(Parser).to have_received(:new).with(raw_data)
  # ...
end
4
  • Fair point. Some of the desire is just because I'm now curious how to even do it. I think it's reasonable to assert that the order doesn't matter... that it's just validating outgoing calls and output... but I would also argue that method that is designed to transform a data set in a particular order through a series of steps might be worth testing in this way I'm asking, because order could matter. You could just validate the final value, but I would also think validating the order is useful, even if not necessary.
    – Dan Sharp
    Aug 1, 2015 at 18:44
  • 3
    sometimes it would make perfect sense to want to test the order.. for example, open a file, write a file, rewind a file, close a file, unlink a file... Any of those things in the wrong order TOTALLY matter.
    – patrick
    Apr 28, 2016 at 22:29
  • yeh i agree with @patrick . i'm using a gem for creating excel files and i need to make sure things are called in a certain sequence (like adding a row, inserting something, and then adding another row) as opposed to what it returns
    – bigpotato
    Jun 20, 2016 at 14:43
  • 1
    I am still not convinced that writing a spec against the order of steps is useful. In both examples (patrick's and Edmund's) I would recommend to write a spec that opens the file content after the operation and compare if its content looks like expected. I don't see a reason why in this examples the order is important as long as the result is the same. Jun 21, 2016 at 8:18
0

I would also argue that in general you should not test execution order however there're legitimate cases of applying it. Consider for example testing code with concurrency involved, such as the following background jobs in Rails:

class MyJob < ActiveJob::Base
  def perform
    some_data.each do |item|
      create(item, parent: parent)
      item.do_something
      item.processed = true
      CleanUpJob.perform_later(item)
    end
  end
end

class CleanUpJob < ActiveJob::Base
  def perform
    # this can return true without waiting for each item to be created
    return unless item.parent.items.all?(&:processed?)
    # this also removes the parent!
    item.destroy
  end
end

Here you should make sure that CleanUpJob is instead performed after each item has been created, like so:

class MyJob < ActiveJob::Base
  def perform
    items = []
    some_data.each do |item|
      create(item, parent: parent)
      item.do_something
      item.processed = true
      items.push(item)
    end

    items.each { |item| CleanUpJob.perform_later(item) }
  end
end

With frameworks (or older versions) that do not support ordered what you could do is stop execution on the call which needs to be executed later and verify that all the previous calls happened:

it "creates all items before scheduling cleanup" do
  expect(CleanUpJob).to receive(:perform_later).and_rasie("let's stop here")

  expect do
    MyJob.perform
  end.to raise_error(/let's stop here/)

  expect(items.count).to eq(some_data.count)
end

Again, this is for exceptional cases and not casual use.

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