4

Why is the second code snippet is behaving unexpectedly?

This question is different from Questions on Javascript hoisting, because this question includes an IIFE, a Local scope, and is an attempt to better understand parent scope.


This function outputs correctly

var one = 1;
function sayOne() {
    console.log(one); // actually gets the value from the global scope
}
sayOne();

Output:

1


But this one does not.

var one = 1;
function sayDoom() {
    console.log(one); // somehow does not get the value from parent scope
    var one = 2;
    console.log(one);
    (function() {
        var one = 3;
        console.log(one); // displays correctly
    })();
}
sayDoom();

Output:

undefined
2
3

Expected:

1
2
3

  • 4
    In sayDoom, you're experiencing hoisting, where locally declared variables (in a function) are hoisted up. You're seeing undefined, because the variable is "available" (through hoisting), but it just hasn't been assigned a value yet. Simply, a var declaration in a function, regardless of where it's placed in the code (top, middle, or bottom of the code block), will always be referenced thanks to hoisting. – Jack Aug 1 '15 at 18:05
  • 2
    @JackPattishall you accidentally posted your answer in the form of a comment. – user4639281 Aug 1 '15 at 18:13
  • 1
    possible duplicate of Questions on Javascript hoisting – melpomene Aug 1 '15 at 18:26
  • It's exactly equivalent to other questions about hoisting. The IIFE has no relevance to anything. Which parent scope do you believe a value is being accessed from? – user663031 Aug 1 '15 at 19:34
  • 1
    Just put your variables declarations at the top of the function and stop worrying about hoisting. – user663031 Aug 1 '15 at 19:38
0

Well, JavaScript declarations are hoisted. So, a variable can be declared after it has been used. In other words; a variable can be used before it has been declared. Because of this, Javascript will read your function like this:

var one = 1;
function sayDoom() {
    var one;
    console.log(one); // one is not defined in the current scope
    one = 2;
    console.log(one);
    (function() {
        var one = 3;
        console.log(one);
    })();
}
sayDoom();
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This is the best explanation so far. – user4639281 Aug 1 '15 at 18:48
4

In javascript due to variable hoisting if you refer to a variable before its declared it will return undefined

actually the code becomes like this

function sayDoom() {
    var one;               // global variable wont be accssible now
    console.log(one); // returns undefined
    one = 2;
    console.log(one);
    (function() {
        var one = 3;
        console.log(one); // displays correctly
    })();
}
sayDoom();

you can access your global one variable using this.one inside the sayDoom() function

edit if your using strict mode this wont work

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    +1. Note that this.one won't work to access the global variable if you're in strict mode. I prefer using window to access global variables, e.g. window.one. – Matt Browne Aug 1 '15 at 18:38
  • 2
    The question only refers to a "parent scope", which is not necessarily global: function outer() { var one = 1; function sayOne() { console.log(one); } sayOne(); } – melpomene Aug 1 '15 at 18:42
  • @melpomene for that he needs to understand closures – hitesh1124 Aug 1 '15 at 18:48
  • @Matt Browne, it is still hard for me to understand why this.one hoists itself into the fuction of another function. I accept it as the case and functionality and have used it as well. But truely understanding it, I don't know. – Alexander Dixon Aug 1 '15 at 18:49
  • 3
    @AlexanderDixon the variable is not being hoisted into the closure, a separate variable is being declared within that scope. – user4639281 Aug 1 '15 at 18:51

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