I have a large table from the web, accessed via requests and parsed with BeautifulSoup. Part of it looks something like this:

<table>
<tbody>
<tr>
<td>265</td>
<td> <a href="/j/jones03.shtml">Jones</a>Blue</td>
<td>29</td>
</tr>
<tr >
<td>266</td>
<td> <a href="/s/smith01.shtml">Smith</a></td>
<td>34</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>

When I convert this to pandas using pd.read_html(tbl) the output is like this:

    0    1          2
 0  265  JonesBlue  29
 1  266  Smith      34

I need to keep the information in the <A HREF ... > tag, since the unique identifier is stored in the link. That is, the table should look like this:

    0    1        2
 0  265  jones03  29
 1  266  smith01  34

I'm fine with various other outputs (for example, jones03 Jones would be even more helpful) but the unique ID is critical.

Other cells also have html tags in them, and in general I don't want those to be saved, but if that's the only way of getting the uid I'm OK with keeping those tags and cleaning them up later, if I have to.

Is there a simple way of accessing this information?

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Since this parsing job requires the extraction of both text and attribute values, it can not be done entirely "out-of-the-box" by a function such as pd.read_html. Some of it has to be done by hand.

Using lxml, you could extract the attribute values with XPath:

import lxml.html as LH
import pandas as pd

content = '''
<table>
<tbody>
<tr>
<td>265</td>
<td> <a href="/j/jones03.shtml">Jones</a>Blue</td>
<td >29</td>
</tr>
<tr >
<td>266</td>
<td> <a href="/s/smith01.shtml">Smith</a></td>
<td>34</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>'''

table = LH.fromstring(content)
for df in pd.read_html(content):
    df['refname'] = table.xpath('//tr/td/a/@href')
    df['refname'] = df['refname'].str.extract(r'([^./]+)[.]')
    print(df)

yields

     0          1   2  refname
0  265  JonesBlue  29  jones03
1  266      Smith  34  smith01

The above may be useful since it requires only a few extra lines of code to add the refname column.

But both LH.fromstring and pd.read_html parse the HTML. So it's efficiency could be improved by removing pd.read_html and parsing the table once with LH.fromstring:

table = LH.fromstring(content)
# extract the text from `<td>` tags
data = [[elt.text_content() for elt in tr.xpath('td')] 
        for tr in table.xpath('//tr')]
df = pd.DataFrame(data, columns=['id', 'name', 'val'])
for col in ('id', 'val'):
    df[col] = df[col].astype(int)
# extract the href attribute values
df['refname'] = table.xpath('//tr/td/a/@href')
df['refname'] = df['refname'].str.extract(r'([^./]+)[.]')
print(df)

yields

    id        name  val  refname
0  265   JonesBlue   29  jones03
1  266       Smith   34  smith01
  • 1
    Thanks. This exact approach doesn't work in my case, because other cells also have href tags that get picked up by the xpath; but given that I have to perform the extra step no matter what, I pulled the UID out using a regex and then populated the new columns with that. – iayork Aug 2 '15 at 13:25
  • Glad you solved the problem! Be careful parsing HTML with regex though; it may work in many cases, but it is hard to make robust. – unutbu Aug 2 '15 at 13:33
  • Understood. In this case I'm not really parsing the html, just looking for the text in the full URL that indicates the uid. It's more fragile than I prefer but these tables should have a consistent structure that makes it relatively safe. – iayork Aug 2 '15 at 13:36

You could simply parse the table manually like this:

import BeautifulSoup
import pandas as pd

TABLE = """<table>
<tbody>
<tr>
<td>265</td>
<td <a href="/j/jones03.shtml">Jones</a>Blue</td>
<td >29</td>
</tr>
<tr >
<td>266</td>
<td <a href="/s/smith01.shtml">Smith</a></td>
<td>34</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>"""

table = BeautifulSoup.BeautifulSoup(TABLE)
records = []
for tr in table.findAll("tr"):
    trs = tr.findAll("td")
    record = []
    record.append(trs[0].text)
    record.append(trs[1].a["href"])
    record.append(trs[2].text)
    records.append(record)

df = pd.DataFrame(data=records)
df

which gives you

     0                 1   2
0  265  /j/jones03.shtml  29
1  266  /s/smith01.shtml  34
  • Thanks for the suggestion. The table is fairly large and there are many cells in each row, so I'd rather avoid manual lifting if possible (and this is hard to generalize), but will fall back to this if there's no simpler solution. – iayork Aug 2 '15 at 12:14

You could use regular expressions to modify the text first and remove the html tags:

import re, pandas as pd
tbl = """<table>
<tbody>
<tr>
<td>265</td>
<td> <a href="/j/jones03.shtml">Jones</a>Blue</td>
<td>29</td>
</tr>
<tr >
<td>266</td>
<td> <a href="/s/smith01.shtml">Smith</a></td>
<td>34</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>"""
tbl = re.sub('<a.*?href="(.*?)">(.*?)</a>', '\\1 \\2', tbl)
pd.read_html(tbl)

which gives you

[     0                           1   2
 0  265  /j/jones03.shtml JonesBlue  29
 1  266      /s/smith01.shtml Smith  34]

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