I can understand the compiler is doing copy-elision in the code below, as the copy and move constructors are not invoked in the so called copy-initialization done in main(). See live example.

#include <iostream>
struct S {
    S() = default;
    S(const S&) { std::cout << "copy ctor" << '\n'; }
    S(S&&) { std::cout << "move ctor" << '\n'; }
};

int main() {
    S s = S(); 
}

But I can't understand why the code doesn't compile when I delete the move constructor as below:

#include <iostream>
struct S {
    S() = default;
    S(const S&) { std::cout << "copy ctor" << '\n'; }
    S(S&&) = delete;
};

int main() {
    S s = S(); 
}

I can't find anything in §12.8/32 (N4140) that could disallow the copy constructor from being used or elided, in this case. This is the sentence that called my attention in §12.8/32, which seems to indicate that the copy constructor should have been considered in the overload resolution:

If the first overload resolution fails or was not performed, or if the type of the first parameter of the selected constructor is not an rvalue reference to the object’s type (possibly cv-qualified), overload resolution is performed again, considering the object as an lvalue.

Edit

From one of the comments by T.C. below, I understand that when the object to be copied is designated by an rvalue, the compiler, according to §12.8/32, doesn't consider the copy-constructor as a candidate for the copy, even though the copy would be elided anyway. That is, the end result would be the construction of the object s with the default constructor. Instead, in this situation the Standard mandates (where??) the code to be ill-formed. Unless my understanding of this scheme is completely wrong, that doesn't make any sense to me.

  • 3
    Overload resolution does not fail when it finds a deleted function. Deleted functions are not non-existent, they are in a sense not deleted. They're simply illegal to call (they can be called, and if you do, that's an error). – dyp Aug 2 '15 at 19:44
  • 2
    And in any event that quote from 12.8/32 doesn't apply. – T.C. Aug 2 '15 at 19:44
  • @T.C. ___ Why not? – François-Marie Arouet Aug 2 '15 at 19:47
  • 1
    Why do you want to avoid copy elision? – T.C. Aug 2 '15 at 19:56
  • 2
    @François-MarieArouet because =delete doesn't mean "this function doesn't exist". If you don't want a function to exist -> just don't declare it. That is, =delete means that if one tries to use such deleted function, a compiler should raise an error. – Piotr Skotnicki Aug 3 '15 at 18:29
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is nothing specific to do with copy elision or constructors; it is just overload resolution.

If we have a pair of overloads:

void f( T&& rv );
void f( const T& lv );

then the overload resolution rules say that f( T{} ) is a better match for f(T&&).

Copy elision can elide a copy or move, but only when the code is well-defined ( even if the compiler chooses not to implement copy elision). Your code is not well-defined, because it specifies to call a deleted function.

  • But why do deleted function have to participate in overload resolution? – François-Marie Arouet Aug 3 '15 at 18:26
  • @François-MarieArouet that's just how it is. It seems more flexible in this case: you can choose to either define move constructor as deleted, or omit it in which case it won't exist and the copy constructor will be called. – M.M Aug 3 '15 at 21:17

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