6

I want to implement is_pointer. I want something like this:

template <typename T >
bool is_pointer( T t )
{
   // implementation
} // return true or false

int a;
char *c;
SomeClass sc;
someAnotherClass *sac;

is_pointer( a ); // return false

is_pointer( c ); // return true

is_pointer( sc ); // return false

is_pointer( sac ); // return true

How can I implement it? Thanks

20
template <typename T>
struct is_pointer_type
{
    enum { value = false };
};

template <typename T>
struct is_pointer_type<T*>
{
    enum { value = true };
};

template <typename T>
bool is_pointer(const T&)
{
    return is_pointer_type<T>::value;
}

Johannes noted:

This is actually missing specializations for T *const, T *volatile and T * const volatile i think.

Solution:

template <typename T>
struct remove_const
{
    typedef T type;
};

template <typename T>
struct remove_const<const T>
{
    typedef T type;
};

template <typename T>
struct remove_volatile
{
    typedef T type;
};

template <typename T>
struct remove_volatile<volatile T>
{
    typedef T type;
};

template <typename T>
struct remove_cv : remove_const<typename remove_volatile<T>::type> {};

template <typename T>
struct is_unqualified_pointer
{
    enum { value = false };
};

template <typename T>
struct is_unqualified_pointer<T*>
{
    enum { value = true };
};

template <typename T>
struct is_pointer_type : is_unqualified_pointer<typename remove_cv<T>::type> {};

template <typename T>
bool is_pointer(const T&)
{
    return is_pointer_type<T>::value;
}

...but of course this is just reinventing the std::type_traits wheel, more or less :)

  • Is there a reason to use this solution over the one given by Thomas? – Job Jul 5 '10 at 7:35
  • 1
    @Job It works for noncopyable types :) – fredoverflow Jul 5 '10 at 7:37
  • Yes of course:) I meant Thomas's answer but with const T& as parameter. – Job Jul 5 '10 at 7:41
  • @Job If Davit ever needs to know whether a type is a pointer (as opposed to an expression), he can use is_pointer_type. One stone, two birds :) – fredoverflow Jul 5 '10 at 7:47
  • 1
    This is actually missing specializations for T *const, T *volatile and T * const volatile i think. For this problem, you can call the trait with is_pointer_type<T const volatile>::value to work it around, but i suspect it would be nicer to put the burden of work into the trait :) – Johannes Schaub - litb Jul 5 '10 at 8:14
10

From Dr. Dobbs.

template <typename T> 
struct is_pointer 
{ static const bool value = false; };

template <typename T> 
struct is_pointer<T*> 
{ static const bool value = true; };

You can't do exactly what you want to do. You'll have to use this like:

is_pointer<int*>::value

It's not possible to determine this at run time.

  • 2
    Well, actually if you can have it at compilation, then you can have it at runtime. The reverse is usually more difficult. Anyway that's the solution I would be aiming for... or just using the Boost Type Traits library. – Matthieu M. Jul 5 '10 at 7:26
  • Peter this look good, but please look my example, I want to pass a variable like this: int ival; is_pointer( ival ); instead of is_pointer<int * > or is_pointer(int) – Davit Siradeghyan Jul 5 '10 at 7:33
  • Every resource gives this implementation but I don't get why the partial specialization is chosen for int * or other pointer types, rather than first primary template? What is the mechanism behind? Is there a type deduction thing going on? I thought that was only possible for function templates. – meguli Dec 14 '17 at 2:08
8
template <typename T>
bool is_pointer(T const &t) // edited: was "T t"; see the comments
{
   return false;
}

template <typename T>
bool is_pointer(T *t)
{
   return true;
}

You might not believe it, but it works. The reason is that the most specific template implementation will be chosen, which is the one which takes the pointer type.

  • 2
    This won't work for noncopyable types. – fredoverflow Jul 5 '10 at 7:21
  • True, it's not the best solution. That's why I upvoted Peter Alexander and you after posting this :) – Thomas Jul 5 '10 at 7:25
  • 1
    @Job T& only binds to lvalues, I suggest const T& instead. – fredoverflow Jul 5 '10 at 7:31
  • 1
    Why won't this work for not copyable types? – Giuseppe Pes Apr 3 '16 at 15:57
  • 1
    @GiuseppePes That comment no longer applies. In my original version, the first function accepted T t instead of T const &t, which obviously needs T to be copyable. – Thomas Apr 4 '16 at 8:46
-2

You can use "typeid" operator defined in typeinfo.h for this. check this link : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Typeid

The typeid operator will give an object of std::type_info class, which has a name() function returning char *. Once you get the type in string form, you can identify the pointer easily.

Hope it helps.

Romil.

  • 1
    -1, doesn't work. The set of std::type_info::name's for pointers may intersect the set of std::type_info::name's for non-pointers. In particular, all names can legally be "". – MSalters Jul 5 '10 at 9:06
  • This. The string returned by .name is entirely implementation defined. – Puppy Jul 5 '10 at 11:21

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