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My app.config has these custom sections:

<Animals>
  <add Type="Elephant" Name="Dumbo" Age="22" />
  <add Type="Giraffe" Name="Shorty" Age="5" />
  <add Type="Giraffe" Name="Mike" Age="7" />
  <add Type="Lion" Name="Shaggy" Age="2" />
</Animals>


<Zoos>
  <add Name="New York Zoo" Animals="Dumbo,Shorty" />
  <add Name="Paris Zoo" Animals="Mike,Shaggy" />
</Zoos>

I have these standard classes: Animal, AnimalCollection, Zoo, ZooCollection.

Zoo is exactly as expected, and looks like this:

public class Zoo : ConfigurationElement {

  [ConfigurationProperty("Name", IsRequired=true)]
  public string Name { get { return base["Name"] as string; } }

  // I don't want this:
  [ConfigurationProperty("Animals", IsRequired=true)]
  public string Animals { get { return base["Animals"] as string; } }

  // I want something like this:
  /*
  [ConfigurationProperty("Animals", IsRequired=true)]
  public IEnumerable<Animal> Animals { get { return ...?
  */

}

So Zoo.Animals is a CSV string of names of Animal instances. But what I want is an IEnumerable<Animal> property.

How do I do that?

1

Basically what you need is to provide a way to convert a comma-separated string value to IEnumerable. This can be achieved by providing a custom TypeConverter. So your Zoo class would look like this:

public class Zoo : ConfigurationElement
{
    [ConfigurationProperty("Name")]
    public string Name
    {
        get { return (string)base["Name"]; }
    }

    [TypeConverter(typeof(AnimalConverter))]
    [ConfigurationProperty("Animals")]
    public IEnumerable<Animal> Animals
    {
        get { return (IEnumerable<Animal>)base["Animals"]; }
    }
}

and the AnimalConverter is:

public class AnimalConverter : TypeConverter
{
    public override object ConvertFrom(ITypeDescriptorContext context, CultureInfo culture, object value)
    {
        AnimalCollection animals = AnimalSettings.Settings.AnimalList;
        List<Animal> result = new List<Animal>();

        foreach (string animalName in value.ToString().Split(','))
        {
            foreach (Animal animal in animals)
            {
                if (animalName == animal.Name)
                {
                    result.Add(animal);
                }
            }
        }

        return result;
    }
}

When I tested it with a console app:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        AnimalCollection animals = AnimalSettings.Settings.AnimalList;
        foreach (Animal animal in animals)
        {
            Console.WriteLine($"{animal.Name}\t\t{animal.Age}\t\t{animal.Type}");
        }
        Console.WriteLine();

        ZooCollection zoos = ZooSettings.Settings.ZooList;
        foreach (Zoo zoo in zoos)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(zoo.Name);
            foreach (Animal animal in zoo.Animals)
            {
                Console.WriteLine($"{animal.Name}\t\t{animal.Age}\t\t{animal.Type}" );
            }
            Console.WriteLine();
        }
    }
}

I got these results:

Dumbo           22              Elephant
Shorty          5               Giraffe
Mike            7               Giraffe
Shaggy          2               Lion

New York Zoo
Dumbo           22              Elephant
Shorty          5               Giraffe

Paris Zoo
Mike            7               Giraffe
Shaggy          2               Lion

I hope this helps.

  • I assume AnimalSettings.Settings.AnimalList is what you get from app.config? That's a problem in our case, as we have a common/shared assembly (which contains Zoo, Animal, the typeconverter, etc.) which we use for all our customer's apps, and then a specific customer's app is in a separate assembly with its own app.config. So I can't refer to that list. I hope that wasn't a confusing explanation! This is an excellent solution if everything is in the same assembly though. – h bob Aug 4 '15 at 13:05
  • Is there a way to achieve your solution in another way where I can supply the list? Problem is the attribute's constructor doesn't accept any other inputs. – h bob Aug 4 '15 at 13:10
  • 1
    Well, this is an answer for the question above which didn't mention anything about separate assemblies. You can modify Settings to open a custom config and return the configsection from that file. Currently it reads the local config: private static AnimalSettings settings = ConfigurationManager.GetSection("Animals") as AnimalSettings; – Volkan Paksoy Aug 4 '15 at 13:11
  • 1
    :-) I haven't tried it in this instance but what I meant was using ConfigurationManager.OpenExeConfiguration This way you can read any configuration file instead of the local one – Volkan Paksoy Aug 4 '15 at 13:19
  • 1
    Yeah, not well-suited for complex scenarios – Volkan Paksoy Aug 4 '15 at 13:28

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