33

Just started learning Swift, I have got my code to read from the text file, and the App displays the content of the Entire Text file. How can I display line by line and call upon that line multiple times?

TextFile.txt contains the following.

  1. Banana
  2. Apple
  3. pear
  4. strawberry
  5. blueberry
  6. blackcurrent

the following is what currently have..

  if let path = NSBundle.mainBundle().pathForResource("TextFile", ofType: "txt"){
        var data = String(contentsOfFile:path, encoding: NSUTF8StringEncoding, error: nil)
            if let content = (data){
                TextView.text = content
    }

also if there is another way, of doing this please let me know. Much appreciated

  • OK, there seems to be only one line in this file. Do you mean separate words instead of lines? – Shripada Aug 3 '15 at 3:32
  • Sorry, its was suppose to be a list using a /n to separate it – ScarletEnvy Aug 3 '15 at 21:53
73

Swift 3.0

if let path = Bundle.main.path(forResource: "TextFile", ofType: "txt") {
    do {
        let data = try String(contentsOfFile: path, encoding: .utf8)
        let myStrings = data.components(separatedBy: .newlines)
        TextView.text = myStrings.joined(separator: ", ")
    } catch {
        print(error)
    }
}

The variable myStrings should be each line of the data.

The code used is from: Reading file line by line in iOS SDK written in Obj-C and using NSString

Check edit history for previous versions of Swift.

  • YES! thanks for that . that worked perfect! Thank You :D – ScarletEnvy Aug 3 '15 at 21:47
  • No problem. Glad I could help! – Caleb Aug 3 '15 at 21:56
  • 1
    Hey also, if I was to display two lines at a time, would that be = myStrings[5,1] ...? – ScarletEnvy Aug 3 '15 at 21:58
  • It would be myStrings[5] and myStrings[1]. You can look up how to use a loop with arrays to see common applications. myStrings[5,1] is a TWO dimensional array. Think of myStrings[5,1] as row 5 column 1 in a table. Think of myStrings[1] as the second entry in a row. – Caleb Aug 3 '15 at 22:00
  • 43
    This does not read a text file line-by-line. It reads the entire file, saves it all into data, and then returns it all as an array of lines. – algal Apr 29 '16 at 22:06
5

Update for Swift 2.0 / Xcode 7.2

    do {
        if let path = NSBundle.mainBundle().pathForResource("TextFile", ofType: "txt"){
            let data = try String(contentsOfFile:path, encoding: NSUTF8StringEncoding)

            let myStrings = data.componentsSeparatedByCharactersInSet(NSCharacterSet.newlineCharacterSet())
            print(myStrings)
        }
    } catch let err as NSError {
        //do sth with Error
        print(err)
    }

Also worth to mention is that this code reads a file which is in the project folder (since pathForResource is used), and not in e.g. the documents folder of the device

3

You probably do want to read the entire file in at once. I bet it's very small.

But then you want to split the resulting string into an array, and then distribute the array's contents among various UI elements, such as table cells.

A simple example:

    var x: String = "abc\ndef"
    var y = x.componentsSeparatedByString("\n")
    // y is now a [String]: ["abc", "def"]
  • Yes! :D thats exactly what I'm asking. so would x be assigned to = data? – ScarletEnvy Aug 3 '15 at 21:44
  • Oh actually I got it :) thanks – ScarletEnvy Aug 3 '15 at 22:55
  • Swift 4: var y = x.components(separatedBy: "\n") – Grzegorz R. Kulesza Jul 30 '18 at 10:53
0

Probably the simplest, and easiest way to do this in Swift 5.0, would be the following:

import Foundation

// Determine the file name
let filename = "main.swift"

// Read the contents of the specified file
let contents = try! String(contentsOfFile: filename)

// Split the file into separate lines
let lines = contents.split(separator:"\n")

// Iterate over each line and print the line
for line in lines {
    print("\(line)")
}

Credit goes to: https://wiki.codermerlin.com/mediawiki/index.php/Code_Snippet:_Print_a_File_Line-by-Line

  • This does not read a text file line-by-line. It reads the entire file, saves it all into a string, splits that into an array of strings, and then prints them one by one. If your string is too large to fit in memory, this will fail. – algal Mar 11 at 3:10

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