16
interface parentInterface
{
   public String methodA(/*define parameters name and dataType*/);
}

and

public class childA : parentInterface
{
  public String methodA(String a, int b, String c, long d){}
}

public class childB : parentInterface
{
   public String methodA(int e, String f, String g){}
}

I want to define interface method's parameters name and data type

5
  • 1
    This defeates the purpose of an Interface Aug 3, 2015 at 7:31
  • 1
    It's pretty unclear what you're doing, but it sounds like the interface should be generic...
    – Jon Skeet
    Aug 3, 2015 at 7:32
  • 2
    what problem are you trying to solve? Aug 3, 2015 at 7:32
  • You could always make childB's the implementation where childA calls its version from method a with a default value for d but then without knowledge of what methodA actually does, its impossible to tell if this is actually a good idea (i'd imagine it isn't)
    – Sayse
    Aug 3, 2015 at 7:36
  • 1
    @chole: A lot of people have taken time to offerer you some advice. It would be respectful to comment on the advice, and upvote anything that is helpful
    – Eric J.
    Aug 10, 2015 at 5:38

4 Answers 4

34

Make a New Parameter

This can often be solved by using a class or struct to use as single parameter rather than the built-in Types.

The Interface

You know what to expect from a class when it implements a familiar interface. We know that all classes implementing the IEnumerable interface can be used in a foreach loop. By convention, the name of the interface is "I" followed by a description of an ability. It is typical for the name to end with the suffix "-able".

-able   Suffix forming adjectives meaning:
           1   -able to be [as in] calculable.
           2   -having the quality of [as in] comfortable.

Oxford English Dictionary

Let's rename parentInterface and MethodA() to give a clear example of how this normally works (and to avoid negative sanctions):

public interface ITreatable
{
    Treatment GetTreatment();
}

Well, finding the cure may not be so easy, even if the object represents a treatable illness. Here's some examples:

public class TheFlu : ITreatable
{
    public Treatment GetTreatment(int year)
    {
        // return some object, Treatment, based on the flu season.
    }
}

public class Hangover : ITreatable
{
    public Treatment GetTreatment()
    {
        return Treatment.Empty; // no parameters necessary.
    }
}

public class Insomnia : ITreatable
{
    public Treatment GetTreatment(FamilyHistory occurances, LabResult lab)
    {
        // return Some Treatment object that can be different based on the
        // calculated risk from the arguments.
    }
}

What We're Really Missing Here

I don't know biology, but the concept is still the same. You have a group of ITreatable illness objects that need to have a GetTreatment() method; however, they use different criteria for making calculations. We need Symptoms.

public class Symptoms
{
    public FamilyHistory History;
    public DateTime Time;
    public LabResult Lab;
    public BloodTest BloodTest;
    public TimeSpan SymptomTime;
    public IsCritical IsCritical;
}

Now, the objects can parse the symptoms in their own method, and our interface will look like this:

public interface ITreatable
{
    Treatment GetTreatment(Symptoms symptoms);
}
3
  • 1
    The problem with Symptoms param class is that probably Hangover class will not use most of the properties from it. Maybe a generic class T could be a solution, but also with the generics we can have different problems based on how we implement this generic classes.
    – lda573
    Oct 13, 2022 at 10:37
  • Like, GetTreatment(Symptoms<T> symptoms); ? Oct 14, 2022 at 13:32
  • no, like this: public interface ITreatable<T> { Treatment GetTreatment(T symptoms);} but like I said, it is not without issues this approach. With a similar problem I've solved with a parameter interface ISymptoms symptoms and a factory method that return the desired implementation.
    – lda573
    Oct 17, 2022 at 14:02
6

You have two different methods

public String methodA(String a, int b, String c, long d){}

and

public String methodA(int e, String f, String g){}

that represent two different contracts to childA and childB respectively. You cannot define an interface with a single methodA that fits both definitions. What you seek to do is not possible.

Note that you could define both overloads in your interface, but then each class implementing that interface would have to implement both overloads.

2
  • Not only is it not possible, it is fundamentally incorrect. The interface is there is define a contract. What use is this if you cannot tell what parameters a method call takes. Aug 3, 2015 at 7:33
  • @DavidPilkington: That's what I meant to express by stating the two different overloads represent two different contracts.
    – Eric J.
    Aug 3, 2015 at 7:34
2

You could use an interface method with a variable number of arguments using the params keyword. But you then need to cast each argument to the appropriate type, which is a bit error prone.

public interface IFoo
{
    void DoWork(params object [] arguments);
}

public class Foo : IFoo
{
    public void DoWork(params object [] arguments)
    {
        string a = (string)arguments[0];
        int b = (int)arguments[1];
        string c = (string)arguments[2];
        long d = (long)arguments[3];

        Console.WriteLine("a={0}, b={1}, c={2}, d={3}", a,b,c,d);
    }
}

public class AnotherFoo : IFoo
{
    public void DoWork(params object [] arguments)
    {       
        int e = (int)arguments[0];
        string f = (string)arguments[1];
        string g = (string)arguments[2];

        Console.WriteLine("e={0}, f={1}, g={2}", e,f,g);
    }
}

void Main()
{
    var foo = new Foo();    
    foo.DoWork("a",1, "c",2L);

    var foo1 = new AnotherFoo();    
    foo1.DoWork(1,"f", "g");
}
0

Methods with different parameters cannot both implement the same interface method declaration. If your method signature does not match that of the interface, you are not implementing the interface.

You can achieve this though, but it is not a good design since the interface is not telling you anything about the method:

interface parentInterface
{
    string methodA(params object[] asd);
}


public class childA : parentInterface
{
    public string methodA(params object[] p)
    {
        string a = p[0] as string;
        int b = (int)p[1];
        string c = p[2] as string;
        long d = (long)p[3];
        return string.Empty;
    }
}

public class childB : parentInterface
{
    public string methodA(params object[] p)
    {
        int e = (int)p[0];
        string f = p[1] as string;
        string g = p[2] as string;
        return string.Empty;
    }
}
0

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