9

I'm playing with ECMAScript6 classes.

I still don't understand why the following code :

"use strict";

class A {}
class B extends A {}

let b = new B();
console.log(b);

Displays :

A { }

Instead of :

B { }

Live Example:

(function () {
    "use strict";

    class A {}
    class B extends A {
        foo() {
        }
    }

    let b = new B();
    console.log(b);
})();
Open the console. Works only on very up-to-date browsers (such as Chrome 43+).


How can I have the expected logical output B { } on console.log ?

May I need to specify my class name to be "B" ? Is there such an option to pass, or an attribute or a function to define ?


T.J. Crowder got it : It is a referenced bug on Chrome.

Everybody, can you star this bug to increase its priority ?

https://code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=510688

7
  • 1
    Tested to be the case on Chrome 44 (OSX)
    – Dominic
    Aug 3 '15 at 10:04
  • 1
    Yeah, Chrome 43 (Linux) as well. Aug 3 '15 at 10:06
  • 1
    Chrome 45 beta, too. OSX
    – Barmar
    Aug 3 '15 at 10:11
  • To be fair, what it displays is technically correct since an instance of B is also an instance of A. To really check you can use instanceof.
    – slebetman
    Aug 3 '15 at 11:17
  • @slebetman: By that logic, it should show Object {}. Aug 3 '15 at 13:22
2

You haven't said what browser you're using, but I figure it has to be Chrome, given the style of the output you showed and that it runs at all. (If I run that in IE11, I get [object Object] {} instead. If I run it in Firefox, I get an error — because Firefox doesn't support class yet.)

I can't think of any reason other than a bug in Chrome. Support for class is very new to Chrome, it could easily be that the devtools just aren't quite handling it correctly yet. I didn't find a bug report on http://crbug.com in a quick search, you might want to file one. But you did find it.

It really should be showing B with your code, not A. It does with the equivalent old-fashioned way to do it:

(function() {
  "use strict";

  function A() {}

  function B() {
    A.call(this);
  }
  B.prototype = Object.create(A.prototype);
  B.prototype.constructor = B;

  var b = new B();
  console.log(b);
})();
Open the console.

2

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.