0

I have a text file. Similar to this.

This is a sample data.
This is a sample data.
This is a sample data.
Sat Jun 06 08:17:01 2015
WARNING: Cannot delete file.
Error-101
Error-100
Error-102
This is a sample data.
This is a sample data.
Error-10666
This is a sample data.
Sat Jun 06 10:17:01 2015
File deleted.
This is a sample data.
This is a sample data.
Sat Jun 06 10:17:01 2015
File deleted.
Sat Jun 06 11:17:01 2015
WARNING: Cannot delete file.
Error-101
This is a sample data.
Sat Jun 06 18:17:01 2015
WARNING: Cannot delete file.
Error-101
This is a sample data.

This file contain one month data. There could be multiple files like this in a directory. Script will need to check the file that modified today.

I want to get the Error-??? (Entire line of Error-) value of today's date. So far i have created this.

$cur_date1 = get-date -UFormat %c
$curdate = (get-date).ToString("ddMMyyyy")
ForEach ($system in (Get-Content D:\Script\system.txt)) {
        $dir = "\\$system\D$\Error\"
        $latest = Get-ChildItem -Path $dir -Filter error*.txt | where{$_.LastWriteTime.ToString("ddMMyyyy") -eq $date }

$files=$latest.name
Foreach($file in $files){
         $path= $dir+$file 

        $search =  Get-Content $path 

    $a = $search| if($_ -eq $curdate){

    Where-Object{$_.Contains("Error-") }


    }

      }

}

I can check the files created today. I can get content of entire file. I can search the error- string but i am not able to search for current date.

Can anybody advise me on this?

Thanks.

If any changes need to be done in title or discription then please do so. Thanks for your time.

Update

Just to inform you my system datetime format is as follows. dd/mm/yyyy hh:mm:ss

1

While you parse error*.txt file, you can save last seen date in a variable. So, when you encounter Error-* record, you will know to what date it related to.

$Today=[datetime]::Today
Get-Content D:\Script\system.txt|
ForEach-Object {
    $System=$_
    Get-ChildItem -Path "filesystem::\\$System\D$\Error" -Filter error*.txt|
    # filesystem:: allows code to work, even if current provider is not a filesystem provider.
    Where-Object {$_.LastWriteTime.Date-eq$Today}|
    ForEach-Object {
        Get-Content -LiteralPath $_.PSPath|
        ForEach-Object {
            $ParseDate=New-Object datetime
            $LastSeenDate=$null
        } {
            if([datetime]::TryParseExact($_,'ddd MMM dd HH:mm:ss yyyy',[cultureinfo]::InvariantCulture,'None',[ref]$ParseDate)){
                $LastSeenDate=$ParseDate
            }
            if($_.StartsWith('Error-')){
                [PSCustomObject]@{
                    Error=$_
                    Date=$LastSeenDate
                    System=$System
                }
            }
        }
    }
}|
Where-Object {$_.Date.Date-eq$Today}
  • thanks for your answer. Voted up. – Ironic Aug 4 '15 at 11:55
  • Your answer worked for me. I wil test one answer and after that i will marked one of them as answer. I am really thankful for your help. – Ironic Aug 4 '15 at 13:45
  • Is it possible to print system name as well from system.txt (you have used $_)? – Ironic Aug 5 '15 at 6:30
  • @404 Yes, it possible. I edit my question. – PetSerAl Aug 5 '15 at 6:39
  • Error while running the script. Get-ChildItem : Cannot evaluate parameter 'Path' because its argument is specified as a script block and there is no input. A script block cannot be evaluated without input. – Ironic Aug 5 '15 at 6:49
2

You can try converting each line to a datetime. That's not a standard date format, however, so [datetime]::TryParse() isn't likely to work. That means you'll need to use [datetime]::TryParseExact(), which is moderately more irritating because you have to give it a provider and a style, even though you're probably not using either.

$dateString = 'Sat Jun 06 08:17:01 2015';

[System.Globalization.CultureInfo]$provider = [System.Globalization.CultureInfo]::InvariantCulture;
[System.Globalization.DateTimeStyles]$style = [System.Globalization.DateTimeStyles]::None;

$format = "ddd MMM dd HH:mm:ss yyyy";
[ref]$parsedDate = get-date;
[DateTime]::TryParseExact($dateString, $format, $provider, $style, $parsedDate);
$parsedDate.Value;

A key thing to note is that both TryParse() and TryParseExact() don't return values; they return True when the parsing is successful, and False when it fails. In order to pass the result, you pass a variable by reference and the function modifies the referenced variable. $parsedDate.Value is where the actual datetime value is because $parsedDate itself is a reference (pointer).

If the function fails and returns false, $parsedDate will have a value of [datetime]::MinValue (Jan 1, 0001).

  • Can you provide us some working code on this. I am not getting it. – Ironic Aug 4 '15 at 1:50
2

$curdate is a string with the format ddMMyyyy, whereas the string in the log file containing the date is in the format ddd MMM dd HH:mm:ss yyyy, which I assume to be the current locale, hence your use of Get-Date -UFormat %c.

Therefore, your if($_ -eq $curdate) statement won't work.

if($_ -eq $cur_date1) will return true if the timestamp contained in $_ represents the exact second your script starts running, but the subsequent Where-Object statement won't evaluate to $true (since $_ is currently referring to the line with the date, not the error) and even if it did, wouldn't return anything (you haven't piped anything to Where-Object or specified an InputObject parameter argument)

As a general rule, for date comparison, don't use a string representation, use the Date property of the datetime objects you are comparing.

Wrong/frail approach:

Get-ChildItem |Where-Object { $_.LastWriteTime.ToString("ddMMyyyy") -eq $datestring }

Safe approach:

$today = (Get-Date).Date
Get-ChildItem |Where-Object { $_.LastWriteTime.Date -eq $today }

If you want to extract the preceding date of an error message, the easiest way is to use Select-String with the Context parameter:

Select-String -Path C:\samplefile.log -Pattern "^Error" -Context 2 | Select-Object -First 1

  C:\samplefile.log:4:Sat Jun 06 08:17:01 2015
  C:\samplefile.log:5:WARNING: Cannot delete file.
> C:\samplefile.log:6:Error-101
  C:\samplefile.log:7:This is a sample data.
  C:\samplefile.log:8:This is a sample data.

You can then use the output data from Select-String to grab and compare the date:

$Today  = (Get-Date).Date
$Format = 'ddd MMM dd HH:mm:ss yyyy'
Select-String -Path C:\samplefile.log -Pattern '^Error' -Context 2 | Where-Object {
    [DateTime]::ParseExact($_.Context.PreContext[0],$Format,$null).Date -eq $Today
} | Select-Object @{Name="Error";Expression={$_.Line}},@{Name="Date";Expression={[DateTime]::ParseExact($_.Context.PreContext[0],$Format,$null).ToString("ddMMyyyy")}}
  • Thanks for your detailed answer. I will give it a try – Ironic Aug 3 '15 at 13:24
  • I tested your script and it is parsing the value but one question i have it is giving me only single error. If there are multiple errors then it is not giving me the output for all the errors. – Ironic Aug 3 '15 at 13:38
  • Be sure to not use the Select-Object -First 1 statement, it was just to show you the output of 1 match with Context – Mathias R. Jessen Aug 3 '15 at 14:28
  • If I use $Today = (Get-Date 06/06/2015).Date and your sample data I get 3 objects back (all with the value Error-101 in the Error property) – Mathias R. Jessen Aug 3 '15 at 15:03
  • Thanks for your comment but my concern is there could be multiple ERROR- under date. Your script is giving output for 1st match only or 1 can say 1 line only. e.g. Sat Jun 06 08:17:01 2015 WARNING: Cannot delete file. Error-101 Error-102 This is a sample data. your code is not working properly in this case. – Ironic Aug 4 '15 at 1:47
1

I got pinged to the question, so here's my take on a solution:

#Create test file from posted data:
(@'
This is a sample data.
This is a sample data.
This is a sample data.
Sat Jun 06 08:17:01 2015
WARNING: Cannot delete file.
Error-101
Error-100
Error-102
This is a sample data.
This is a sample data.
Error-10666
This is a sample data.
Sat Jun 06 10:17:01 2015
File deleted.
This is a sample data.
This is a sample data.
Sat Jun 06 10:17:01 2015
File deleted.
Sat Jun 06 11:17:01 2015
WARNING: Cannot delete file.
Error-101
This is a sample data.
Sat Jun 06 18:17:01 2015
WARNING: Cannot delete file.
Error-101
This is a sample data.
'@).split("`n") |
#where { -notmatch '^#'} |
foreach {$_.trim()} |sc testfile.txt

#Proxy function for testing
function get-date {[datetime]'06/06/2015 18:17:01'} 

#Actual solution code follows:

$DateSearch = (get-date).ToString('MMM dd [0-9:]+ yyyy(.+)')
$DateSearch = '(?ms)' + $DateSearch

if ((Get-Content testfile.txt -Raw) -match  $DateSearch)
{ $Matches[1].Split("`n") -like 'Error*' }

#remove the proxy function:
 remove-item function:get-date

Error-101
Error-100
Error-102
Error-10666
Error-101
Error-101

This uses the [datetime] tostring() method to help create a regex to search for today's date in the file. Then it captures everything from that point to the end of the file, splits it at the newlines and filters out everything except the Error records.

Ignore that proxy function for get-date. That's just there to get the script to work with the test data.

  • Thanks for your help. I will give it a try. – Ironic Aug 4 '15 at 13:44

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.