4

I used two NOSQL database, MongoDB and Neo4j, to handle the same information. I want to compare the performance using the first and second db. I talked about my problem with MongoDB in this question: the execution time millis was always equal to 0. So I added approximately 250 documents in my collection but without any success:

> db.team.find({common_name:"Milan"},{_id:0, "stadium.name":1}).explain("executionStats")

{
        "queryPlanner" : {
                "plannerVersion" : 1,
                "namespace" : "Progettino.team",
                "indexFilterSet" : false,
                "parsedQuery" : {
                        "common_name" : {
                                "$eq" : "Milan"
                        }
                },
                "winningPlan" : {
                        "stage" : "PROJECTION",
                        "transformBy" : {
                                "_id" : 0,
                                "stadium.name" : 1
                        },
                        "inputStage" : {
                                "stage" : "COLLSCAN",
                                "filter" : {
                                        "common_name" : {
                                                "$eq" : "Milan"
                                        }
                                },
                                "direction" : "forward"
                        }
                },
                "rejectedPlans" : [ ]
        },
        "executionStats" : {
                "executionSuccess" : true,
                "nReturned" : 1,
                "executionTimeMillis" : 0,
                "totalKeysExamined" : 0,
                "totalDocsExamined" : 253,
                "executionStages" : {
                        "stage" : "PROJECTION",
                        "nReturned" : 1,
                        "executionTimeMillisEstimate" : 0,
                        "works" : 255,
                        "advanced" : 1,
                        "needTime" : 253,
                        "needFetch" : 0,
                        "saveState" : 0,
                        "restoreState" : 0,
                        "isEOF" : 1,
                        "invalidates" : 0,
                        "transformBy" : {
                                "_id" : 0,
                                "stadium.name" : 1
                        },
                        "inputStage" : {
                                "stage" : "COLLSCAN",
                                "filter" : {
                                        "common_name" : {
                                                "$eq" : "Milan"
                                        }
                                },
                                "nReturned" : 1,
                                "executionTimeMillisEstimate" : 0,
                                "works" : 255,
                                "advanced" : 1,
                                "needTime" : 253,
                                "needFetch" : 0,
                                "saveState" : 0,
                                "restoreState" : 0,
                                "isEOF" : 1,
                                "invalidates" : 0,
                                "direction" : "forward",
                                "docsExamined" : 255
                        }
                }
        }


For example in MongoDB, this query will work better than in Neo4j, because I used denormalized model to represent information about teams' stadium. In fact, in Neo4j, this query needs 50 ms as you can see:
enter image description here

So, what can I do to have information about execution time millis in MongoDB? I have some problems if execution time millis is always equal to 0 because I can't show different performance on same queries with the two different NoSQL DB.

5

As stated in your other question that I answered. Your collection is just too small. here is the output I have from a database with over 3K items. Notice my executionTimeInMillis is only 2 milliseconds. You are going to need a lot more data to make mongo really churn. talking 10K plus records depending on what the size of your machine is.

{
"queryPlanner" : {
    "plannerVersion" : 1,
    "namespace" : "arenas.arenas",
    "indexFilterSet" : false,
    "parsedQuery" : {
        "$and" : []
    },
    "winningPlan" : {
        "stage" : "COLLSCAN",
        "filter" : {
            "$and" : []
        },
        "direction" : "forward"
    },
    "rejectedPlans" : []
},
"executionStats" : {
    "executionSuccess" : true,
    "nReturned" : 3718,
    "executionTimeMillis" : 2,
    "totalKeysExamined" : 0,
    "totalDocsExamined" : 3718,
    "executionStages" : {
        "stage" : "COLLSCAN",
        "filter" : {
            "$and" : []
        },
        "nReturned" : 3718,
        "executionTimeMillisEstimate" : 0,
        "works" : 3724,
        "advanced" : 3718,
        "needTime" : 1,
        "needFetch" : 4,
        "saveState" : 31,
        "restoreState" : 31,
        "isEOF" : 1,
        "invalidates" : 0,
        "direction" : "forward",
        "docsExamined" : 3718
    },
    "allPlansExecution" : []
}

}

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  • Ok, thank you. I wrote a java program to add automatically 100k+ documents to my collection. Now I can compare easily queries. – DistribuzioneGaussiana Aug 16 '15 at 10:47
0

I'm not sure if comparing a denormalized Mongo DB is fair unless you're talking about building a very specific use-case where you won't ever build out complexity on top of what you have.

That said, you'll want to familiarized yourself with the PROFILE and EXPLAIN commands in Neo4j's cypher (assuming you're using version 2.2.x). That will help you understand what Neo4j is doing.

I expect that one thing that you'll want to do, if you haven't already, is to create an index on the _id property of the Team label like this:

CREATE INDEX ON :Team(_id)

If it's a unique property you'll probably want to create a constraint (which automatically creates an index for you) like this:

CREATE CONSTRAINT ON (n:Team) ASSERT n._id IS UNIQUE

If you do this then that n1 node in your MATCH will be able to use the index to go right to the node(s) on disk that you care about and then do a handful of hops across the PLAYS relationship to get those other nodes.

Also, agreed that you should try testing with more data ;)

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