1

I am working with a team member where I am implementing a class and he is implementing a class. We are working in Java.

My class has a dependency on my team members class:

public myClass(MyTeamMemberClass a) {
 //do stuff
}

My team member is building his class and I am building my class, but we are on separate git branches, so his class isn't available to me yet.

  1. What is the best way to stub this dependency while I wait for his code commit?

  2. Is it just to change the dependency type to Object, wait for the commit, and then change to the correct type or is there a more elegant way?

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    Check to use an interface – JFPicard Aug 3 '15 at 18:38
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    The best thing to do is to go to lunch or work on something else until he stubs out his class and commits it. :) – teacurran Aug 3 '15 at 18:39
  • I think Object class it's a bit too extreme. Perhaps you will need some methods from your colleague. Use a common interface for both branches. – Daniel Jipa Aug 3 '15 at 18:42
3

Before you can both work on this, you need to decide what interface you are coding to. If you do not yet have a rough idea of the responsibilities of your team member's class, and therefore cannot pull out an interface, then you should consider pair programming until you can decide what the first version of the interface should look like.

You should create this interface for your team member's class which can be checked in now:

public interface MyTeamMemberInterface {
  // ...
}

public myClass(MyTeamMemberInterface a) {
 //do stuff
}

You colleague can now work seperately on his implementation of said interface:

public class MyTeamMemberClass implements MyTeamMemberInterface {
  //...
}

The best way to do this would be for you to write your class, and let your requirements drive what the interface should look like (perhaps using TDD). Then after this, you can work on the implementation with your team member.

1
  • your answer sounds about right, but you did not answer op's concerns ? – Kick Buttowski Aug 3 '15 at 18:47

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