14

Meet my

$ uname -a
Linux hostmachine 4.1.2-2-ARCH #1 SMP PREEMPT Wed Jul 15 08:30:32 UTC 2015 x86_64 GNU/Linux

I'm trying to learn how to use GDB for debugging C programs. I think it would be particularly excellent if I could use GDB to ferret out bugs that lead to segfaults. I have a small program that I've written as a solution to K&R's exercise 1-13, and given an input string of a certain size it will generate a segfault:

$ ~/learning_c/KR_exercises/chapter_1/1.13.x`

--I provide a string from stdin, and...--

Segmentation fault (core dumped)

According to the Arch wiki, "Systemd's default behavior is to generate core dumps for all processes in /var/lib/systemd/coredump/."

Okie doke:

$ls /var/lib/systemd/coredump/core.1\x2e13\x2ex.1000.0da6be3a2b4647c8befe14e0e73af848.1719.1438627150000000.lz4

But when I run:

$ gdb -q ~/learning_c/KR_exercises/chapter_1/1.13.x /var/lib/systemd/coredump/core.1\\x2e13\\x2ex.1000.0da6be3a2b4647c8befe14e0e73af848.1719.1438627150000000.lz4

I get:

Reading symbols from /home/dean/learning_c/KR_exercises/chapter_1/1.13.x...done.
"/var/lib/systemd/coredump/core.1\x2e13\x2ex.1000.0da6be3a2b4647c8befe14e0e73af848.1719.1438627150000000.lz4" is not a core dump: File format not recognized

Trying to generate a core dump by attaching GDB to the process as detailed here only makes my terminal emulator start capturing control characters (^D, ^C, and ^Z won't work in emulator after attaching GDB), and if a segfault is occuring after attaching GDB it isn't being reported in the shell.

Help me to understand, oh merciful and beneficent lords of Stack Overflow!

ADDENDUM:

I've solved this particular issue, thanks largely to WhozCraig, whom suggested that GDB was behaving as it should have when being force-fed an lz4 compressed corefile. If Craig would be so kind as to post a solution saying something similar, I'd be happy to give him that big 'ol check mark.

The easist solution is to start gdb via a subroutine named coredumpctl along with the crashed program's PID, a la

$coredumpctl gdb *PID HERE*

This vexes me, Arch, and I may migrate over to Gentoo because of it.

6
  • Not having my linux box handy, I can only speculate that gdb is puking on being fed a LZ4 compressed file as what it thinks is a raw core dump? Just a guess, mind you, but perhaps worth a peek.
    – WhozCraig
    Aug 3 '15 at 20:15
  • This is a perfectly plausible solution! And now I'm rather embarrassed that I didn't recognize the .lz4 file extension. As soon as I get done reading the relavent documentation on lz4 and manage to get the core file decompressed, I will report back! Aug 3 '15 at 20:32
  • Have you tried setting break points and stepping through the program with GDB?
    – Rdesmond
    Aug 3 '15 at 20:32
  • @Rdesmond, I could. And, for small programs like the one I'm working with, that approach is probably just as effective (maybe faster) than examining the core dump. My goal here, though, is to learn how to use core dumps. Suppose that a future hypothetical program is huge, or runs for a really long time before segfault, or behavior relies on a bunch of random environmental inputs? Being able to work with core files makes debugging in those scenarios a little less intractably tedious. Aug 3 '15 at 20:41
  • looking at this page freedesktop.org/software/systemd/man/journald.conf.html seems that by default if the core size is greater they are compressed.All you need to do is set the Compress value to false
    – Pradheep
    Aug 4 '15 at 1:46
12

I've solved this particular issue, thanks largely to WhozCraig, whom suggested that GDB was behaving as it should have when being force-fed an LZ4 compressed corefile. If Craig would be so kind as to post a solution saying something similar, I'd be happy to give him that big 'ol check mark I'm taking all the credit, though. Bwahahaha!

The easiest solution is to start gdb via a subroutine named coredumpctl along with the crashed program's PID, a la

$coredumpctl gdb PID HERE

This vexes me, Arch, and I may migrate over to Gentoo because of it.

2
  • 14
    Easiest is just coredumpctl gdb -1 to debug the latest dump.
    – jthill
    Jan 21 '18 at 15:29
  • Yeah, you're trying to open a compressed file as if it's a coredump. Arch isn't to blame, systemd is, and you for not knowing what changed with coredumps. change /proc/kernel/core_pattern back to "core" if you want the old behavior, or just use coredumpctl gdb
    – GL2014
    Dec 6 '19 at 15:19
4

I have same purpose with you. Just uncompress lz4 file by lz4 command, then you can debug by gdb crashed_C_executable_file uncompressed_coredump_file

1
  • 1
    If you use coredumpctl gdb, you don't need to uncompress or recompress it.
    – GL2014
    Dec 6 '19 at 15:20

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.