13

What is the closest equivalent Rust code to this Python code?

a, b = 1, 2
a, b = b, a + b

I am trying to write an iterative Fibonacci function. I have Python code I want to convert to Rust. Everything is fine, except for the swap part.

def fibonacci(n):
    if n < 2:
        return n
    fibPrev = 1
    fib = 1
    for num in range(2, n):
        fibPrev, fib = fib, fib + fibPrev
    return fib
19

When swapping variables, the most likely thing you want is to create new bindings for a and b.

fn main() {
    let (a, b) = (1, 2);
    let (b, a) = (a, a + b);
}

However, in your actual case, there isn't a nice solution. When you do as above, you always create new bindings for a and b, but you want to modify the existing bindings. One solution I know of is to use a temporary:

fn fibonacci(n: u64) -> u64 {
    if n < 2 {
        return n;
    }
    let mut fib_prev = 1;
    let mut fib = 1;
    for _ in 2..n {
        let next = fib + fib_prev;
        fib_prev = fib;
        fib = next;
    }
    fib
}

You could also make it so that you mutate the tuple:

fn fibonacci(n: u64) -> u64 {
    if n < 2 {
        return n;
    }
    let mut fib = (1, 1);
    for _ in 2..n {
        fib = (fib.1, fib.0 + fib.1);
    }
    fib.1
}

You may also be interested in swapping the contents of two pieces of memory. 99+% of the time, you want to re-bind the variables, but a very small amount of time you want to change things "in place":

fn main() {
    let (mut a, mut b) = (1, 2);
    std::mem::swap(&mut a, &mut b);

    println!("{:?}", (a, b));
}

Note that it's not concise to do this swap and add the values together in one step.

  • can you elaborate on when someone would want to change things in place vs re-binding the variables? Also, what's wrong with creating new bindings? Not efficient? – No_name Jul 3 '17 at 16:52
5

In addition, a better way to implement the Fibonacci sequence in Rust is using the Iterator trait:

// Iterator data structure
struct FibIter(u32, u32);

// Iterator initialization function
fn fib() -> FibIter {
    FibIter(0u32, 1u32)
}

// Iterator trait implementation
impl Iterator for FibIter {
    type Item = u32;
    fn next(&mut self) -> Option<u32> {
        *self = FibIter(self.1, self.1 + self.0);
        Some(self.0)
    }
}

fn main() {
    println!("{:?}", fib().take(15).collect::<Vec<_>>());
}

See The Rust Programming Language chapter on iterators.

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