4

These two pieces of code have different order of output. First piece:

while(!jobQueue.isEmpty()) {
    TimeoutJobRequest job = jobQueue.peek();
    if(job.isReady()) {
        execute(job);
        jobQueue.poll();
    } else {
        return;
    }
}

Second piece:

jobQueue.stream()
        .filter(TimeoutJobRequest::isReady)
        .peek(jobQueue::remove)
        .forEach(this::execute);

Note that jobQueue is a PriorityBlockingQueue.

The reordering occurs only when this::execute is relatively long (like for a couple of seconds.)

  • 3
    What is the question? – Alex Aug 4 '15 at 0:57
  • 6
    PriorityBlockingQueue#stream does not order the elements by queue priority. – Misha Aug 4 '15 at 1:07
7

The stream of PriorityBlockingQueue follows the Iterator order, which according to the documentation:

The Iterator provided in method iterator() is not guaranteed to traverse the elements of the PriorityBlockingQueue in any particular order.

If you want the priority order, you need to poll the elements from the PriorityBlockingQueue.

PriorityBlockingQueue<Integer> pq = new PriorityBlockingQueue<>();
pq.add(5);
pq.add(8);
pq.add(3);

System.out.println("-- Try 1 --");
pq.stream().forEach(System.out::println);

System.out.println("-- Try 2 --");
IntStream.range(0, pq.size()).map(i -> pq.poll()).forEach(System.out::println);

Output (it may depend on Java implementation):

-- Try 1 --
3
8
5
-- Try 2 --
3
5
8
  • 1
    Note that stream().sorted() should also work (and probably even faster than polling each element). – Tagir Valeev Aug 4 '15 at 11:44
  • 1
    Good point! Although with my approach, we don't need to care about what is the order underlying the PriorityBlockingQueue, as it could have been initialized with a Comparator. It's true that in that case, we could also use stream().sorted(pq.comparator()), but we need to be careful, because the sorted doesn't like nulls. – Helder Pereira Aug 4 '15 at 12:13
4

If you want to create a stream that follows the queue order you can try the following code (it empties the queue):

Stream.generate(jobQueue::poll).limit(jobQueue.size())
1

The first piece of code is not equal to the second one, when the job.isReady() function returns false, the first one terminate, but the second still run, the function filter of stream is only a filtering operation

you can change the first piece of code to

while(!jobQueue.isEmpty()) {
    TimeoutJobRequest job = jobQueue.peek();
    if(job.isReady()) {
        execute(job);
        jobQueue.poll();
    } 
}
0

Unfortunately, iteration order != priority order.

I prepared two copy-paste'able solutions for using Stream API for traversing a PriorityQueue using the priority order:

static <T> Stream<T> drainToStream(PriorityQueue<T> queue) {
    Objects.requireNonNull(queue);
    return Stream.generate(queue::poll)
      .limit(queue.size());
}

static <T> Stream<T> asStream(PriorityQueue<T> queue) {
    Objects.requireNonNull(queue);
    Comparator<? super T> comparator = queue.comparator();
    return comparator != null
      ? queue.stream().sorted(comparator)
      : queue.stream().sorted();
}

The draintToStream empties the queue, whereas the asStream remains the original queue intact.

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