7

If I create the following multi-line string literal:

let lit = "A -> B
           C -> D
           E -> F";

It prints out like this:

A -> B
          C -> D
          E -> F

No surprise. However, if I try this:

let lit = "A -> B\
           C -> D\
           E -> F";

I get:

A -> BC -> DE -> F

What I'm trying to get is this:

A -> B
C -> D
E -> F

But this is the best thing I've come up with:

let lit = "A -> B\n\
           C -> D\n\
           E -> F";

Or maybe this:

let lit = vec!["A -> B", "C -> D", "E -> F"].connect("\n");

Both of those feel a little clunky, though not terrible. Just wondering if there's any cleaner way?

2

Indoc is a procedural macro that does what you want. It stands for "indented document." It provides a macro called indoc!() that takes a multiline string literal and un-indents it so the leftmost non-space character is in the first column.

let lit = indoc!("A -> B
                  C -> D
                  E -> F");

The result is "A -> B\nC -> D\nE -> F" as you asked for.

There are a few equivalent ways to format the same thing if you prefer, so choose one you like. The following both result in the same string as above. The content can be indented as much as you like – it does not have to be 4 spaces.

let lit = indoc!("
    A -> B
    C -> D
    E -> F");

let lit = indoc!(
    "A -> B
     C -> D
     E -> F");

Whitespace is preserved relative to the leftmost non-space character in the document, so the following preserves 2 spaces before "C":

let lit = indoc!(
     "A -> B
        C -> D
      E -> F");

The result is "A -> B\n C -> D\nE -> F".

0

I see three other possible solutions:

1) Get rid of the spaces:

let lit = "A -> B
C -> D
E -> F";

This way, you lose the neat display in your code. You could get that back like this:

2) Get rid of the spaces, shift everything down a line, and escape the return.

let lit = "\
A -> B
C -> D
E -> F";

I would explain what that "\" is doing in a comment, though, because it isn't obvious otherwise.

3) Combine these two solutions:

let lit = 
"A -> B
C -> D
E -> F";

You can test this at Ideone.

  • 1
    I was using 1) initially. The problem is it looks pretty bad with indented code. – anderspitman Aug 4 '15 at 4:20
  • @ChrisMorgan Thank you. – user2509848 Aug 4 '15 at 4:21
  • @anderspitman: Isn't it a generic issue with indented code and multi-line? I seem to remember similar issues with Python... – Matthieu M. Aug 4 '15 at 11:09
  • You could use spaces in the assignment, then substitute away any line-initial spaces. This is mildly inefficient, of course. – tripleee Aug 4 '15 at 14:58
0

Mostly as an exercise, I mimicked Python's join syntax with the following:

trait CanJoin {
    fn join(&self, in_strings: Vec<&str>) -> String;
}

impl CanJoin for str {
    fn join(&self, in_strings: Vec<&str>) -> String {
        in_strings.connect(self)
    }
}

fn main() {
    let vector = vec!["A -> B", "B -> C", "C -> D"];
    let joined = "\n".join(vector);
}

Or as a macro:

macro_rules! join_lines {
    ($($x:tt)*) => {
        {
            vec![$($x)*].connect("\n")
        }
    }
}

let joined = join_lines!("A -> B", "B -> C", "C -> D");
  • Using a vector here is overkill. ["a", "b"].connect("-") is sufficient. – Shepmaster Aug 15 '15 at 13:15
  • 1
    Also note that connect is being renamed to join. – Shepmaster Aug 15 '15 at 13:16

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