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I'm using an unordered_map as a sparse 3D-array (128 x 128 x 128) to insert values into a grid, provided the grid cell is still free.

Up until now I always checked with find() if the cell is free and if it is, then I've added an element using insert() or emplace(). Now I've found that I can use the return value of insert and emplace to check if the element has been added or if there was already an element with the same key inside the map. I thought this could improve performance since I could completely remove the usage of find.

As it turns out, rather than improving the performance by inserting without find, the performance actually decreased and I'm not sure why.

I've reduced my application to this example where points are randomly generated and then inserted into the grid.

#include <unordered_map>
#include <random>
#include <chrono>
#include <iostream>
#include <math.h>
#include <algorithm>
#include <string>

using std::cout;
using std::endl;
using std::chrono::high_resolution_clock;
using std::chrono::milliseconds;
using std::chrono::duration_cast;
using std::unordered_map;

int num_elements = 5'000'000;


void findThenInsert(){
    cout << endl << "find and emplace" << endl;

    auto start = high_resolution_clock::now();

    std::mt19937 gen(123);
    std::uniform_real_distribution<> dis(0, 128);

    unordered_map<int, int> grid;
    int count = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < num_elements; i++){
        float x = dis(gen);
        float y = dis(gen);
        float z = (cos(x*0.1) * sin(x*0.1) + 1.0) * 64.0;

        int index = int(x) + int(y) * 128 + int(z) * 128 * 128;
        auto it = grid.find(index);
        if(it == grid.end()){
            grid.emplace(index, count);
            count++;
        }
    }

    cout << "elements: " << count << endl;
    cout << "load factor: " << grid.load_factor() << endl;

    auto end = high_resolution_clock::now();
    long long duration = duration_cast<milliseconds>(end - start).count();
    float seconds = duration / 1000.0f;
    cout << seconds << "s" << endl;
}


void insertThenCheckForSuccess(){
    cout << endl << "emplace and check success" << endl;

    auto start = high_resolution_clock::now();

    std::mt19937 gen(123);
    std::uniform_real_distribution<> dis(0, 128);

    unordered_map<int, int> grid;
    int count = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < num_elements; i++){
        float x = dis(gen);
        float y = dis(gen);
        float z = (cos(x*0.1) * sin(x*0.1) + 1.0) * 64.0;

        int index = int(x) + int(y) * 128 + int(z) * 128 * 128;
        auto it = grid.emplace(index, count);
        if(it.second){
            count++;
        }
    }

    cout << "elements: " << count << endl;
    cout << "load factor: " << grid.load_factor() << endl;

    auto end = high_resolution_clock::now();
    long long duration = duration_cast<milliseconds>(end - start).count();
    float seconds = duration / 1000.0f;
    cout << seconds << "s" << endl;
}

int main(){

    findThenInsert();
    insertThenCheckForSuccess();

}

In both cases the size of the map is 82901 afterwards so I assume the result is exactly the same.

find and emplace:   0.937s
emplace then check: 1.268s
  • 4
    IIRC, emplace for unordered_map must allocate regardless of whether the key is present, so you are paying for some extra allocations in the second case. – T.C. Aug 4 '15 at 8:19
  • 2
    @TheParamagneticCroissant That is C++14: "Optional single quotes(') may be inserted between the digits as a separator, they are ignored by the compiler." – Chris Drew Aug 4 '15 at 8:38
  • @ChrisDrew oh, that is quite nice, didn't realize that. – The Paramagnetic Croissant Aug 4 '15 at 8:41
  • @T.C. why does it need to allocate? – n. 'pronouns' m. Aug 4 '15 at 9:09
  • @n.m emplace takes Args&&... args you need to construct something with those args before it can compare it against the other keys and as I understand common implementations of emplace will construct in the desired destination (dynamically allocated in memory) and delete it if it is not required. – Chris Drew Aug 4 '15 at 9:13
19

The problem is that the specification of emplace for associative containers in effect requires an allocation even in the failure case; the cost of this allocation and reallocation dominates the cost of a failed probe in the find-then-insert strategy.

This is because emplace is specified to emplace-construct value_type (i.e. pair<Key const, T>) from its forwarded arguments; only once it has constructed the pair can it hash the key to check whether it is already present. (It can't just take the first argument, because that could be std::piecewise_construct.) It also can't construct the pair in automatic storage and then move it into a node, because emplace is not specified to require a copyable or even movable value_type, so it has to perform a potentially expensive node allocation on every call. (Note that the ordered associative containers have the same problem, but there the O(log n) cost of a probe is more significant compared to the cost of allocation.)

Unless your inserts are expected to succeed in the majority of cases, you are better off using find-then-emplace over emplace-then-test. You could also use insert, as long as you make sure you're calling the value_type overload and not the template that forwards to emplace.

This is (probably) fixed in C++17, which (should) have try_emplace, with similar semantics to emplace but improved performance in the failure case. (The semantic difference is that the mapped type is not emplace-constructed in the failure case; this makes it possible to e.g. store unique_ptr as the mapped type.)

  • @ChrisDrew yes, but you have to be careful - the template overload of insert forwards to emplace. I think this is also fixed in C++17, though. – ecatmur Aug 4 '15 at 9:19
  • Please quote your sources. Map-type containers have separate keys and values. Only keys are compared/hashed. There is no need to construct the pair to hash/compare the key. map::find somehow manages to do so. (It can't just take the first argument, because that could be std::piecewise_construct.) This part is unclear. Please explain. – n. 'pronouns' m. Aug 4 '15 at 9:21
  • @n.m. map::find has a key_type argument; emplace just has a pack of undifferentiated arguments that are forwarded to the constructor of value_type. All sources for this are the C++ standard, clause [unord.req], specifically the table Unordered associative container requirements (in addition to container). – ecatmur Aug 4 '15 at 9:25
  • 1
    "constructing the key twice" the standard says nothing about constructing a value_type when a key exists, yet it is somehow deduced that it must be constructed. Why value_type is OK and key is not? – n. 'pronouns' m. Aug 4 '15 at 10:04
  • 1
    @ChrisDrew I only have 4.9.3 here and alas it doesn't do any of this (checked in the source). – n. 'pronouns' m. Aug 4 '15 at 11:06
7

I think the issue is that you are using emplace instead of insert. The problem is that emplace functions in associative containers usually allocate memory for the node even if the key is already present. So that if you are regularly emplacing duplicates those memory allocations are wasted. If you used insert instead it would only do the memory allocation if the insert is successful.

Scott Meyers says to only prefer emplace functions over insert functions if "the container won't reject the value being added due to it being a duplicate"

I can't quite reproduce your results exactly but my testing shows that insert (not emplace) then test is even faster than find then emplace:

auto it = grid.insert({index, count});

This decision might also depend on how costly it is to create your value type. find does not need to construct the value type, it just needs the key. But emplace and insert need the key and the value type so in cases where it is costly to create the value it may be faster to use find and only create the value if you need to. In this case your value is just an int so I expect insert or emplace to always win over find-then-emplace.

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