5

I can't quite wrap my head around how a user will be able to distinguish between the exceptions my functions can throw. One of my functions can throw two instances of std::invalid_argument.

For example, in a constructor:

#include <stdexcept> // std::invalid_argument
#include <string>

class Foo
{
public:
    void Foo(int hour, int minute)
    :h(hour), m(minute)
    {
        if(hour < 0 || hour > 23)
            throw std::invalid_argument(std::string("..."));
        if(minute < 0 || minute > 59)
            throw std::invalid_argument(std::string("..."));
    }
}

Note: It's an example, please do not answer with bounded integers.

Say the user calls with foo(23, 62);, how would the user's exception handler distinguish between the two possible instances of std::invalid_argument?

Or am I doing this wrong, and I should inherit from std::invalid_argument to distinguish between them? That is,

class InvalidHour: public std::invalid_argument
{
public:
    InvalidHour(const std::string& what_arg)
    :std::invalid_argument(msg) {};
}

class InvalidMinute: public std::invalid_argument
{
public:
    InvalidMinute(const std::string& what_arg)
    :std::invalid_argument(msg) {};
}

Then, throw InvalidHour and InvalidMinute?

Edit: Creating a class for every possible exception seems a little too much to me, especially in a large program. Does every program that effectively uses exceptions this way come with extensive documentation on what to catch?

As mentioned in an answer, I have considered assert to. Looking around stackoverflow, I have found a majority of people saying you should throw an exception (as my particular case is for a constructor).

After looking around a lot of online information on when to use exceptions, the general consensus is to use an assert for logic errors and exceptions for runtime errors. Although, calling foo(int, int) with invalid arguments could be a runtime error. This is what I want to address.

  • 4
    Ideally you should have two types, Hour and Minute, that throw their own exception type when constructed with invalid values. – user657267 Aug 4 '15 at 8:20
  • Yes, you are correct, you should introduce new types if you want to differentiate between them in a neat fashion – Maksim Solovjov Aug 4 '15 at 8:20
  • 3
    "how a user will be able to distinguish between the exceptions my functions can throw" Why do you need the user / does the user need to distinguish between those two cases? Does foo only validate its arguments? – dyp Aug 4 '15 at 8:24
  • 2
    Shouldn't that be hour > 23? Or do you want 25 different possible hours? – fredoverflow Aug 4 '15 at 8:24
  • @fredoverflow: I think in some system, 24h00 is valid (24h30 is not). So there is a third case, when the combination of both argument is invalid. (harder to find a correct/explicit/simple name for this one). – Jarod42 Aug 4 '15 at 8:37
4

The standard exception hierarchy is unsuitable for logic errors. Use an assert and be done with it. If you absolutely do want to transform hard bugs into harder to detect run time errors, then note that there are only two reasonable things a handler can do: achieve the contractual goal in some possibly different way (possibly just retrying the operation), or in turn throw an exception (usually just rethrowing), and that the exact cause of the original exception seldom plays any rôle in this. Finally, if you do want to support code that really tries various combinations of arguments until it finds one that doesn't throw, no matter how silly that appears now that it's written out in words, well, you have std::system_error for passing an integer error code up, but you can define derived exception classes.

All that said, go for the assert.

That's what it's for.

  • What if it turns out to be a runtime error? A termination in that case would not be justified, would it? – Shreyas Aug 4 '15 at 11:30
  • @ShreyasVinod: The term "runtime error" usually refers to some failure handling at run time, but there is no way an invalid argument value can be that. Thus I have only a vague possibility for what you mean, but I think that whatever it is it can help to think of a function as having a contract. It has some requirements, e.g. on argument values, and if those requirements are met then it's obligated to produce a certain result or, if it fails, to throw an exception. Otherwise, with a contract breach the warranty is voided. That's like a car engine: give it gas, OK, give it sugar water, !. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Aug 4 '15 at 11:39
  • I was thinking more like something outside the user's control. Perhaps an external value provided by the end-user that happens to be wrong. I guess it's the function's user's responsibility to make sure this input is valid before passing it onto my function. You're absolutely correct. – Shreyas Aug 4 '15 at 11:42
1

You could also create further error classes that derive from invalid_argument, and that would make them distinguishable, but this is not a solution that scales. If what you actually want is to show the suer a message that he can understand, then the string parameter to the invalid_argument would serve that purpose.

1

The standard exceptions do not allow storing the additional information you want, and parsing exception messages is a bad idea. One solution is to subclass, as you mention. There are others - with the advent of std::exception_ptr. it is possible to use "inner" (or "nested") exceptions as in Java or .NET, though this feature is more applicable to exception translation. Some prefer Boost.Exception, as another solution for exceptions extensible at runtime.

Don't fall into the "just assert trap" like Cheers and hth. Simple example:

void safe_copy(const char *from, std::size_t fromLen, char *buf, std::size_t bufLen)
{
    assert( fromLen <= bufLen );
    std::copy(from, from + fromLen, buf);
}

There's nothing wrong with the assert per se, but if the code is compiled for release (with NDEBUG set), then safe_copy will not be safe at all, and the result may be a buffer overrun, potentially allowing a malicious party to take over the process. Throwing an exception to indicate a logic error has its own problems, as mentioned, but at least it will prevent the immediate undefined behavior in the release build. I'd therefore suggest, in security-critical functions, to use assertions in the debug, and exceptions in the release build:

void safe_copy(const char *from, std::size_t fromLen, char *buf, std::size_t bufLen)
{
    assert( fromLen <= bufLen );
    if ( fromLen > bufLen )
        throw std::invalid_argument("safe_copy: fromLen greater than bufLen");
    std::copy(from, from + fromLen, buf);
}

Of course, if you use this pattern a lot, you may wish to define a macro of your own to simplify the task. This is beyond the scope of the current topic, however.

  • I once (like 15 years ago) wrapped up the solution you present, a combo with assert and exception throwing, and posted an article about it on the web (today that would be a blog posting). To be slightly less unsafe, a hard exception that propagates to the top, the exception that takes the place of an assertshouldn't be a standard exception. It turned out that I didn't use the thing later. Nobody else did either. It's like the idea of defining a WITH macro (yes BTDT too). So I think your dismissal of my apparently simple advice is a bit premature. It's based on once inventing your solution. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Aug 4 '15 at 11:23
  • 1
    Hm, while I'm at it, I'd better note that argument validity checking that doesn't check for huge values of unsigned integer arguments, is worse than no checking. Gives a false sense of security while not checking the most common error (wraparound of negative value). If you absolutely want the possibly large 64-bit range for 64-bit builds, and you want a descriptive name, then using Size = ptrdiff_t is your friend. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Aug 4 '15 at 11:29
1

Two other reasons to throw exceptions rather than have assertions is when you are implementing a library or some form of exportable code and cannot tell apriori how a user will want to handle some form of error or when you need checking when the user builds your code in RELEASE mode (which users often do). Note that building in RELEASE mode "takes away" any assertions.

For example, take a look at this code:

struct Node 
{ 
    int data; 
    Node* next;
    Node(int d) : data(d), next(nullptr) {}
};

// some code 
Node* n =  new Node(5);
assert(n && "Nodes can't be null");

// use n

When this code is build in RELEASE mode, that assertion "doesn't exist" and the caller might get n being nullptr at runtime.

If the code threw an exception instead of the assertion, the caller can still "react" to a nullptr anomaly in both debug and release builds. The downside is that the exception approach requires a lot more boiler plate code.

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