4

All,

I want to find out the date of previous wednesday from the given date.

Eg. I have date as "20150804" and i would need "20150729".

DateTime is not available and i cannot install it as well.

I looked at few examples but they were using DateTime.

Can you please redirect me where i can get some help.? Thanks.

I am planning to code something like below.

Code:

#!/opt/perl-5.8.0/bin/perl

use warnings;
use strict;

my $dt="20150804";
my $prevWednesday=getPrevWednesday($dt);

sub getPrevWednesday()
{
    my $givenDt=shift;
    ...
}
  • cant you simply store the date of a reference wednesday and then calculate based on that? for example you mark 2014-12-31 was wednesday, you could store that and calculate the rest by divison of number of days etc? – KameeCoding Aug 4 '15 at 8:59
  • 2
    What if today is Wednesday? Do you want today's date or that of a week ago? – Borodin Aug 4 '15 at 9:47
  • @Borodin, He asked for the previous Wednesday, so a week ago. – ikegami Aug 4 '15 at 16:47
5

Another brute force approach, this time using another core module Time::Local.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

use Time::Local;

sub prev_wednesday {
    my $date = shift;
    my ($year, $month, $day) = $date =~ /(....)(..)(..)/;
    my $time = timelocal(0, 0, 12, $day, $month - 1, $year);
    do { $time -= 60 * 60 * 24 } until (localtime $time)[6] == 3; # <- Wednesday
    my ($y, $m, $d) = (localtime $time)[5, 4, 3];
    return sprintf "%4d%02d%02d\n", 1900 + $y, $m + 1, $d;
}

print $_, ' ', prev_wednesday($_), for qw( 20150804 20150805 20150806
                                           20150101 20000301 20010301 );
  • 1
    The OP's antique Perl still has POSIX::strftime() available. That would simplify the last last couple of lines in your subroutine. – Dave Cross Aug 4 '15 at 9:33
  • 1
    I'd change do { $time -= 60 * 60 * 24 } until (localtime $time)[6] == 3; to something like $time -= ((localtime $time)[6] + 4) % 7 * 24*60*60; to avoid the search loop. – Qtax Aug 4 '15 at 13:21
2

Using Time::Piece :

use feature qw(say);
use strict;
use warnings;

use Time::Piece;
use Time::Seconds;
my $str = '20150804';
my $fmt = '%Y%m%d';
my $t = Time::Piece->strptime($str, $fmt);
do {
    $t = $t - ONE_DAY;
} until ( $t->day eq 'Wed');
say $t->strftime($fmt);
  • Time::Piece got added to the core in 5.9.5. The OP doesn't have it. – simbabque Aug 4 '15 at 9:51
  • 3
    Your $t->strftime('%u') eq "3" is probably more readable as $t->day eq 'Wed' or $t->wday == 4. – Dave Cross Aug 4 '15 at 9:58
  • @DaveCross Thanks...updated – Håkon Hægland Aug 4 '15 at 10:00
2

There's always the brute force approach.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

use POSIX 'strftime';

my $ONE_DAY = 24 * 60 * 60;

# Get now
my $time = time;

# Subtract days until you get to a Wednesday
do {
  $time -= $ONE_DAY;
} until (localtime($time))[6] == 3;

# Format
say strftime '%Y%m%d', localtime $time;

But if you're working in a Perl environment where you can't install modules from CPAN, then it is always worth working to get that restriction removed. Modern Perl programming is often a case of plumbing together the right series of CPAN modules. If you don't have access to CPAN then you're just making your life much harder than it needs to be.

If you really can't get the restriction lifted, then look for another job. It's not worth dealing with people who impose such pointless restrictions.

Update: Just noticed that you're also using a prehistoric version of Perl. You'll need to remove the use 5.010 and replace the say with print. And brush up your CV :-/

Update 2: choroba's solution is better. It deals with any date in the correct format. Mine just deals with the current date. The advice about fixing your working environment still holds though.

  • 2
    Is it just me or do your days only have 20 hours? I understand wanting more hours per day, but less? :D – simbabque Aug 4 '15 at 12:55
  • I have no idea where that came from. Thanks, fixed :-/ – Dave Cross Aug 4 '15 at 12:59
  • 1
    This code will not always work since not all days have 24 hours. The leading answer sets the time to noon to avoid this problem – ikegami Aug 4 '15 at 16:44
2

Here is a more elegant solution that does not do bruteforce.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Time::Local 'timelocal';
use POSIX 'strftime';

my $dt = "20150804";
say getPrevWednesday($dt);

# note you do not want () here, 
# see http://perldoc.perl.org/perlsub.html#Prototypes
sub getPrevWednesday {
    my $givenDt = shift;

    # parse the string into a unix timestamp
    my ( $year, $month, $day ) = $givenDt =~ /(....)(..)(..)/;
    my $timestamp = timelocal( 0, 0, 12, $day, $month - 1, $year );

    # get the day of week, ignore the rest
    my ( undef, undef, undef, undef, undef, undef, $wday ) =
        localtime $timestamp;

    # because we start the week with Sunday on day 0
    # and to get to the previous Wednesday from Sunday it's
    # 4 days (Wednesday is 3) we can add 4 to the
    # number of this day, divide by 7, take the leftover (modulo)
    # and then subtract that many days
    # (86_400 is one day in seconds)

    #       v- -6 ------
    #                           6 % 7 = 6
    #                   +4 -----v
    #                   v
    # 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
    # S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
    my $prev_wed = $timestamp - ( ( $wday + 4 ) % 7 * 86_400 );

    # go one week back if we got the same day
    $prev_wed -= ( 7 * 86_400 ) if $prev_wed == $timestamp;

    # debug output
    warn "in: " . localtime($timestamp) . "\n";
    warn "out: " . localtime($prev_wed) . "\n\n";

    # put it back into your format
    return strftime('%Y%m%d', localtime $timestamp);
}

Output:

# STDOUT
20150804

# STDERR
in: Tue Aug  4 12:00:00 2015
out: Wed Jul 29 12:00:00 2015
  • The logic here seems faulty. If $wday >= 3 you would get invalid results. Instead you need to subtract ($wday + 4) % 7 days from the timestamp. If you don't want the current wednesday, you can avoid the if you have by directly subtracting ($wday + 3) % 7 + 1 days, which would give you 7 instead of 0 if $wday is already 3. – Qtax Aug 4 '15 at 12:57
  • @Qtax you are right. My test cases didn't go far enough to see that. Thank you. I've updated the answer. – simbabque Aug 4 '15 at 13:04
  • Also you need to subtract 1 from the month parameter sent to timelocal, it takes the values 0 to 11, not 1 to 12. – Qtax Aug 4 '15 at 13:16
  • It seems this is not my day @qtax ;) fixed – simbabque Aug 4 '15 at 13:35

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