How do I setup a class that represents an interface? Is this just an abstract base class?

15 Answers 15

up vote 640 down vote accepted

To expand on the answer by bradtgmurray, you may want to make one exception to the pure virtual method list of your interface by adding a virtual destructor. This allows you to pass pointer ownership to another party without exposing the concrete derived class. The destructor doesn't have to do anything, because the interface doesn't have any concrete members. It might seem contradictory to define a function as both virtual and inline, but trust me - it isn't.

class IDemo
{
    public:
        virtual ~IDemo() {}
        virtual void OverrideMe() = 0;
};

class Parent
{
    public:
        virtual ~Parent();
};

class Child : public Parent, public IDemo
{
    public:
        virtual void OverrideMe()
        {
            //do stuff
        }
};

You don't have to include a body for the virtual destructor - it turns out some compilers have trouble optimizing an empty destructor and you're better off using the default.

  • 100
    Virtual desctuctor++! This is very important. You may also want to include pure virtual declarations of the operator= and copy constructor definitions to prevent the compiler auto-generating those for you. – xan Nov 25 '08 at 17:52
  • 29
    An alternative to a virtual destructor is a protected destructor. This disables polymorphic destruction, which may be more appropriate in some circumstances. Look for "Guideline #4" in gotw.ca/publications/mill18.htm. – Fred Larson Nov 25 '08 at 19:06
  • 8
    One other option is to define a pure virtual (=0) destructor with a body. The advantage here is that the compiler can, theoretically, see that vtable has no valid members now, and discard it altogether. With a virtual destructor with a body, said destructor can be called (virtually) e.g. in the middle of construction via this pointer (when constructed object is still of Parent type), and therefore the compiler has to provide a valid vtable. So if you don't explicitly call virtual destructors via this during construction :) you can save on code size. – Pavel Minaev Dec 31 '09 at 9:04
  • 46
    How typical of a C++ answer that the top answer doesn't directly answer the question (though obviously the code is perfect), instead it optimizes the simple answer. – Tim Aug 24 '12 at 22:49
  • 16
    Don't forget that in C++11 you can specify the override keyword to allow for compile-time argument and return value type checking. For example, in the declaration of Child virtual void OverrideMe() override; – Sean Jan 15 '13 at 3:19

Make a class with pure virtual methods. Use the interface by creating another class that overrides those virtual methods.

A pure virtual method is a class method that is defined as virtual and assigned to 0.

class IDemo
{
    public:
        virtual ~IDemo() {}
        virtual void OverrideMe() = 0;
};

class Child : public IDemo
{
    public:
        virtual void OverrideMe()
        {
            //do stuff
        }
};
  • 28
    you should have a do nothing destructor in IDemo so that it is defined behavior to do: IDemo *p = new Child; /*whatever */ delete p; – Evan Teran Nov 26 '08 at 8:33
  • 11
    Why is the OverrideMe method in Child class is virtual ? Is that necessary ? – Cemre Jan 31 '12 at 22:26
  • 9
    @Cemre - no it's not necessary, but it doesn't hurt either. – PowerApp101 Feb 12 '12 at 11:15
  • 10
    It is generally a good idea to keep the keyword 'virtual' whenever overriding a virtual method. Though not required, it can make the code clearer - otherwise, you have no indication that that method could be used polymorphically, or even exists in the base class. – Kevin Oct 3 '14 at 20:47
  • 22
    @Kevin Except with override in C++11 – keyser Nov 26 '14 at 21:34

The whole reason you have a special Interface type-category in addition to abstract base classes in C#/Java is because C#/Java do not support multiple inheritance.

C++ supports multiple inheritance, and so a special type isn't needed. An abstract base class with no non-abstract (pure virtual) methods is functionally equivalent to a C#/Java interface.

  • 16
    It would still be nice to be able to create interfaces, to save us from typing so much (virtual , =0, virtual destructor). Also multiple inheritance seems like a really bad idea to me and I've never seen it used in practice, but interfaces are needed all the time. To bad the C++ comity won't introduce interfaces just because I want them. – Ha11owed Aug 1 '12 at 6:05
  • 8
    Ha11owed: It has interfaces. They're called classes with pure virtual methods and no method implementations. – Miles Rout Jan 1 '13 at 6:51
  • 5
    @doc: java.lang.Thread has methods and constants that you probably don't want to have in your object. What should the compiler do if you extend from Thread, and another class with the public method checkAccess()? Would you really prefer to use strongly named base pointers like in C++? This seems like bad design, you usually need composition where you think that you need multiple inheritance. – Ha11owed Nov 28 '14 at 15:05
  • 4
    @Ha11owed it was long time ago so I don't remember details, but it had methods and contants that I wanted to have in my class and more importantly I wanted my derived class object to be a Thread instance. Multiple inheritance can be bad design as well as composition. It all depends on case. – doc Nov 28 '14 at 15:21
  • 1
    @Ha11owed +1 for "you usually need composition where you think that you need multiple inheritance" – Joel Coehoorn Nov 30 '14 at 3:49

There is no concept of "interface" per se in C++. AFAIK, interfaces were first introduced in Java to work around the lack of multiple inheritance. This concept has turned out to be quite useful, and the same effect can be achieved in C++ by using an abstract base class.

An abstract base class is a class in which at least one member function (method in Java lingo) is a pure virtual function declared using the following syntax:

class A
{
  virtual void foo() = 0;
};

An abstract base class cannot be instantiated, i. e. you cannot declare an object of class A. You can only derive classes from A, but any derived class that does not provide an implementation of foo() will also be abstract. In order to stop being abstract, a derived class must provide implementations for all pure virtual functions it inherits.

Note that an abstract base class can be more than an interface, because it can contain data members and member functions that are not pure virtual. An equivalent of an interface would be an abstract base class without any data with only pure virtual functions.

And, as Mark Ransom pointed out, an abstract base class should provide a virtual destructor, just like any base class, for that matter.

  • 11
    More than "lack of multiple inheritance" I would say, to replace multiple inheritance. Java was designed like this from the beginning because multiple inheritance create more problems than what it solves. Good answer – OscarRyz Nov 25 '08 at 17:32
  • 10
    Oscar, that depends on whether you are a C++ programmer who learned Java or vice versa. :) IMHO, if used judiciously, like almost anything in C++, multiple inheritance solves problems. An "interface" abstract base class is an example of a very judicious use of multiple inheritance. – Dima Nov 25 '08 at 17:40
  • 7
    @OscarRyz Wrong. MI only creates problem when misused. Most alleged problems with MI would also come up with alternate designs (without MI). When people have a problem with their design with MI, it's the fault of MI; if they have a design problem with SI, it's their own fault. "Diamond of death" (repeated inheritance) is a prime example. MI bashing is not pure hypocrisy, but close. – curiousguy Aug 16 '12 at 3:24
  • 4
    Semantically, interfaces are different from abstract classes, so Java's interfaces are not just a technical workaround. The choice between defining an interface or an abstract class is driven by semantics, not technical considerations. Let's imagine some interface "HasEngine": that's an aspect, a feature, and it can be applied to / implemented by very different types (whether classes or abstract classes), so we'll define an interface for that, not an abstract class. – Marek Stanley Mar 25 '15 at 17:22
  • 2
    @MarekStanley, you may be right, but I wish you'd picked a better example. I like to think of it in terms of inheriting an interface vs. inheriting an implementation. In C++ you can either inherit both interface and implementation together (public inheritance) or you can inherit only the implementation (private inheritance). In Java you have the option of inheriting just the interface, without an implementation. – Dima Mar 25 '15 at 17:28

As far I could test, it is very important to add the virtual destructor. I'm using objects created with new and destroyed with delete.

If you do not add the virtual destructor in the interface, then the destructor of the inherited class is not called.

class IBase {
public:
    virtual ~IBase() {}; // destructor, use it to call destructor of the inherit classes
    virtual void Describe() = 0; // pure virtual method
};

class Tester : public IBase {
public:
    Tester(std::string name);
    virtual ~Tester();
    virtual void Describe();
private:
    std::string privatename;
};

Tester::Tester(std::string name) {
    std::cout << "Tester constructor" << std::endl;
    this->privatename = name;
}

Tester::~Tester() {
    std::cout << "Tester destructor" << std::endl;
}

void Tester::Describe() {
    std::cout << "I'm Tester [" << this->privatename << "]" << std::endl;
}


void descriptor(IBase * obj) {
    obj->Describe();
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {

    std::cout << std::endl << "Tester Testing..." << std::endl;
    Tester * obj1 = new Tester("Declared with Tester");
    descriptor(obj1);
    delete obj1;

    std::cout << std::endl << "IBase Testing..." << std::endl;
    IBase * obj2 = new Tester("Declared with IBase");
    descriptor(obj2);
    delete obj2;

    // this is a bad usage of the object since it is created with "new" but there are no "delete"
    std::cout << std::endl << "Tester not defined..." << std::endl;
    descriptor(new Tester("Not defined"));


    return 0;
}

If you run the previous code without virtual ~IBase() {};, you will see that the destructor Tester::~Tester() is never called.

  • 3
    Best answer on this page as it makes the point by supplying a practical, compilable example. Cheers! – Lumi Mar 10 '12 at 22:43
  • 1
    Testet::~Tester() runs only when the obj is "Declared with Tester". – Alessandro L. Jan 17 '13 at 14:01
  • Actually, the string privatename's destructor will be called, and in memory, that is all there will be allocated for. As far as the runtime is concerned, when all the concrete members of a class are destroyed, so is the class instance. I tried a similar experiment with a Line class that had two Point structs and found both the structs were destructed (Ha!) upon a delete call or return from the encompassing function. valgrind confirmed 0 leak. – Chris Reid May 26 '17 at 7:46

My answer is basically the same as the others but I think there are two other important things to do:

  1. Declare a virtual destructor in your interface or make a protected non-virtual one to avoid undefined behaviours if someone tries to delete an object of type IDemo.

  2. Use virtual inheritance to avoid problems whith multiple inheritance. (There is more often multiple inheritance when we use interfaces.)

And like other answers:

  • Make a class with pure virtual methods.
  • Use the interface by creating another class that overrides those virtual methods.

    class IDemo
    {
        public:
            virtual void OverrideMe() = 0;
            virtual ~IDemo() {}
    }
    

    Or

    class IDemo
    {
        public:
            virtual void OverrideMe() = 0;
        protected:
            ~IDemo() {}
    }
    

    And

    class Child : virtual public IDemo
    {
        public:
            virtual void OverrideMe()
            {
                //do stuff
            }
    }
    
  • 5
    +1 for mentioning the virtual inheritance. – neuro May 3 '11 at 8:20
  • 2
    there is no need for virtual inheritance as you do not have any data members in an interface. – Robocide Jul 3 '11 at 7:22
  • 3
    Virtual inheritance is important for methods as well. Without it, you will run into ambiguities with OverrideMe(), even if one of the 'instances' of it is pure virtual (just tried this myself). – Knarf Navillus Aug 1 '12 at 0:22
  • 5
    @Avishay_ "there is no need for virtual inheritance as you do not have any data members in an interface." Wrong. – curiousguy Aug 16 '12 at 3:25
  • Notice that virtual inheritance may not work on some gcc versions, as version 4.3.3 which is shipped with WinAVR 2010: gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=35067 – mMontu Sep 19 '12 at 17:55

All good answers above. One extra thing you should keep in mind - you can also have a pure virtual destructor. The only difference is that you still need to implement it.

Confused?


    --- header file ----
    class foo {
    public:
      foo() {;}
      virtual ~foo() = 0;

      virtual bool overrideMe() {return false;}
    };

    ---- source ----
    foo::~foo()
    {
    }

The main reason you'd want to do this is if you want to provide interface methods, as I have, but make overriding them optional.

To make the class an interface class requires a pure virtual method, but all of your virtual methods have default implementations, so the only method left to make pure virtual is the destructor.

Reimplementing a destructor in the derived class is no big deal at all - I always reimplement a destructor, virtual or not, in my derived classes.

  • 4
    Why, oh why, would anyone want to make the dtor in this case pure virtual? What would be the gain of that? You'd just force something onto the derived classes that they likely have no need to include - a dtor. – Johann Gerell Nov 26 '08 at 7:57
  • 5
    Updated my answer to answer your question. Pure virtual destructor is a valid way to achieve (the only way to achieve?) an interface class where all methods have default implementations. – Rodyland Dec 2 '08 at 20:27

In C++11 you can easily avoid inheritance altogether:

struct Interface {
  explicit Interface(SomeType& other)
  : foo([=](){ return other.my_foo(); }), 
    bar([=](){ return other.my_bar(); }), /*...*/ {}
  explicit Interface(SomeOtherType& other)
  : foo([=](){ return other.some_foo(); }), 
    bar([=](){ return other.some_bar(); }), /*...*/ {}
  // you can add more types here...

  // or use a generic constructor:
  template<class T>
  explicit Interface(T& other)
  : foo([=](){ return other.foo(); }), 
    bar([=](){ return other.bar(); }), /*...*/ {}

  const std::function<void(std::string)> foo;
  const std::function<void(std::string)> bar;
  // ...
};

In this case, an Interface has reference semantics, i.e. you have to make sure that the object outlives the interface (it is also possible to make interfaces with value semantics).

These type of interfaces have their pros and cons:

  • They require more memory than inheritance based polymorphism.
  • They are in general faster than inheritance based polymorphism.
  • In those cases in which you know the final type, they are much faster! (some compilers like gcc and clang perform more optimizations in types that do not have/inherit from types with virtual functions).

Finally, inheritance is the root of all evil in complex software design. In Sean Parent's Value Semantics and Concepts-based Polymorphism (highly recommended, better versions of this technique are explained there) the following case is studied:

Say I have an application in which I deal with my shapes polymorphically using the MyShape interface:

struct MyShape { virtual void my_draw() = 0; };
struct Circle : MyShape { void my_draw() { /* ... */ } };
// more shapes: e.g. triangle

In your application, you do the same with different shapes using the YourShape interface:

struct YourShape { virtual void your_draw() = 0; };
struct Square : YourShape { void your_draw() { /* ... */ } };
/// some more shapes here...

Now say you want to use some of the shapes that I've developed in your application. Conceptually, our shapes have the same interface, but to make my shapes work in your application you would need to extend my shapes as follows:

struct Circle : MyShape, YourShape { 
  void my_draw() { /*stays the same*/ };
  void your_draw() { my_draw(); }
};

First, modifying my shapes might not be possible at all. Furthermore, multiple inheritance leads the road to spaghetti code (imagine a third project comes in that is using the TheirShape interface... what happens if they also call their draw function my_draw ?).

Update: There are a couple of new references about non-inheritance based polymorphism:

  • 5
    TBH inheritance is far more clear than that C++11 thing, which pretends to be an interface, but is rather a glue to bind some inconsistent designs. Shapes example is detached from reality and Circle class is a poor design. You should use Adapter pattern in such cases. Sorry if it will sound a little bit harsh, but try to use some real life library like Qt before making judgements about inheritance. Inheritance makes life much easier. – doc Oct 15 '14 at 17:28
  • 2
    It doesn't sound harsh at all. How is the shape example detached from reality? Could you give an example (maybe on ideone) of fixing Circle using the Adapter pattern? I'm interested to see its advantages. – gnzlbg Oct 15 '14 at 17:42
  • O.K. I will try to fit in this tiny box. First of all, you usually choose libraries like "MyShape" before you start writing your own application, to safe your work. Otherwise how could you know Square isn't already there? Foreknowledge? That's why it is detached from reality. And in reality if you choose to rely on "MyShape" library you can adopt to its interface from the very beginning. In shapes example there are many nonsenses (one of which is that you have two Circle structs), but adapter would look something like that -> ideone.com/UogjWk – doc Oct 15 '14 at 18:18
  • 2
    It is not detached from reality then. When company A buys company B and wants to integrate company B's codebase into A's, you have two completely independent code bases. Imagine each has a Shape hierarchy of different types. You cannot combine them easily with inheritance, and add company C and you have a huge mess. I think you should watch this talk: youtube.com/watch?v=0I0FD3N5cgM My answer is older, but you'll see the similarities. You don't have to reimplement everything all the time,you can provide an implementation in the interface, and choose a member function if available. – gnzlbg Oct 15 '14 at 21:56
  • 1
    I've watched part of video and this is totally wrong. I never use dynamic_cast except for debugging purposes. Dynamic cast means theres something wrong with your design and designs in this video are wrong by design :). Guy even mentions Qt, but even here he is wrong - QLayout does not inherit from QWidget nor the other way around! – doc Oct 16 '14 at 2:19

If you're using Microsoft's C++ compiler, then you could do the following:

struct __declspec(novtable) IFoo
{
    virtual void Bar() = 0;
};

class Child : public IFoo
{
public:
    virtual void Bar() override { /* Do Something */ }
}

I like this approach because it results in a lot smaller interface code and the generated code size can be significantly smaller. The use of novtable removes all reference to the vtable pointer in that class, so you can never instantiate it directly. See the documentation here - novtable.

  • 4
    I don't quite see why you used novtable over standard virtual void Bar() = 0; – Flexo Sep 17 '11 at 13:09
  • 2
    It's in addition to (I've just noticed the missing = 0; which I've added). Read the documentation if you don't understand it. – Mark Ingram Sep 20 '11 at 14:44
  • I read it without the = 0; and assumed it was just a non-standard way of doing exactly the same. – Flexo Sep 20 '11 at 14:47

A little addition to what's written up there:

First, make sure your destructor is also pure virtual

Second, you may want to inherit virtually (rather than normally) when you do implement, just for good measures.

  • Why inherit virtually? – Tim Nov 25 '08 at 18:51
  • I like virtual inheritance because conceptually it means that there is only one instance of the inherited class. Admittedly, the class here does not have any space requirement so it may be superfluous. I haven't done MI in C++ for a while, but wouldn't nonvirtual inheritance complicate upcasting? – Uri Nov 25 '08 at 19:09
  • Why, oh why, would anyone want to make the dtor in this case pure virtual? What would be the gain of that? You'd just force something onto the derived classes that they likely have no need to include - a dtor. – Johann Gerell Nov 26 '08 at 7:55
  • 2
    If there is a situation that an object would be destroyed through a pointer to the interface, you should make sure that the destructor is virtual... – Uri Nov 26 '08 at 9:14
  • There is nothing wrong with a pure virtual destructor. It's not necessary, but there's nothing wrong with it. Implementing a destructor in a derived class is hardly a huge burden on the implementor of that class. See my answer below for why you'd do this. – Rodyland Dec 5 '08 at 3:24

You can also consider contract classes implemented with the NVI (Non Virtual Interface Pattern). For instance:

struct Contract1 : boost::noncopyable
{
    virtual ~Contract1();
    void f(Parameters p) {
        assert(checkFPreconditions(p)&&"Contract1::f, pre-condition failure");
        // + class invariants.
        do_f(p);
        // Check post-conditions + class invariants.
    }
private:
    virtual void do_f(Parameters p) = 0;
};
...
class Concrete : public Contract1, public Contract2
{
private:
    virtual void do_f(Parameters p); // From contract 1.
    virtual void do_g(Parameters p); // From contract 2.
};
  • For other readers, this Dr Dobbs article "Conversations: Virtually Yours" by Jim Hyslop and Herb Sutter elaborates a bit more on why one might want to use the NVI. – user2067021 Nov 1 '11 at 0:39
  • And also this article "Virtuality" by Herb Sutter. – user2067021 Nov 1 '11 at 1:15

I'm still new in C++ development. I started with Visual Studio (VS).

Yet, no one seems to mentioned the __interface in VS (.NET). I am not very sure if this is a good way to declare an interface. But it seems to provide an additional enforcement (mentioned in the documents). Such that you don't have to explicitly specify the virtual TYPE Method() = 0;, since it will be automatically converted.

__interface IMyInterface {
   HRESULT CommitX();
   HRESULT get_X(BSTR* pbstrName);
};

However, I don't use it because I am concern about the cross platform compilation compatibility, since it only available under .NET.

If anyone do have anything interesting about it, please share. :-)

Thanks.

While it's true that virtual is the de-facto standard to define an interface, let's not forget about the classic C-like pattern, which comes with a constructor in C++:

struct IButton
{
    void (*click)(); // might be std::function(void()) if you prefer

    IButton( void (*click_)() )
    : click(click_)
    {
    }
};

// call as:
// (button.*click)();

This has the advantage that you can re-bind events runtime without having to construct your class again (as C++ does not have a syntax for changing polymorphic types, this is a workaround for chameleon classes).

Tips:

  • You might inherit from this as a base class (both virtual and non-virtual are permitted) and fill click in your descendant's constructor.
  • You might have the function pointer as a protected member and have a public reference and/or getter.
  • As mentioned above, this allows you to switch the implementation in runtime. Thus it's a way to manage state as well. Depending on the number of ifs vs. state changes in your code, this might be faster than switch()es or ifs (turnaround is expected around 3-4 ifs, but always measure first.
  • If you choose std::function<> over function pointers, you might be able to manage all your object data within IBase. From this point, you can have value schematics for IBase (e.g., std::vector<IBase> will work). Note that this might be slower depending on your compiler and STL code; also that current implementations of std::function<> tend to have an overhead when compared to function pointers or even virtual functions (this might change in the future).

Here is the definition of abstract class in c++ standard

n4687

13.4.2

An abstract class is a class that can be used only as a base class of some other class; no objects of an abstract class can be created except as subobjects of a class derived from it. A class is abstract if it has at least one pure virtual function.

class Shape 
{
public:
   // pure virtual function providing interface framework.
   virtual int getArea() = 0;
   void setWidth(int w)
   {
      width = w;
   }
   void setHeight(int h)
   {
      height = h;
   }
protected:
    int width;
    int height;
};

class Rectangle: public Shape
{
public:
    int getArea()
    { 
        return (width * height); 
    }
};
class Triangle: public Shape
{
public:
    int getArea()
    { 
        return (width * height)/2; 
    }
};

int main(void)
{
     Rectangle Rect;
     Triangle  Tri;

     Rect.setWidth(5);
     Rect.setHeight(7);

     cout << "Rectangle area: " << Rect.getArea() << endl;

     Tri.setWidth(5);
     Tri.setHeight(7);

     cout << "Triangle area: " << Tri.getArea() << endl; 

     return 0;
}

Result: Rectangle area: 35 Triangle area: 17

We have seen how an abstract class defined an interface in terms of getArea() and two other classes implemented same function but with different algorithm to calculate the area specific to the shape.

  • 5
    This is not what is considered an interface! That's just an abstract base class with one method that needs to be overridden! Interfaces are typically objects that contain only method definitions - a "contract" other classes have to fulfill when they implement the interface. – guitarflow Mar 26 '14 at 10:55

protected by Community Dec 5 '13 at 13:40

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.