2

There is a known problem "Longest increasing subsequence", which is: Given an array of integers, find out the longest increasing sequence in that array. I now face a similar but apparently more complicated problem: Given an array of integers and a given number N, find N sequences in that array so that each of them is increasing, they do not intersect by indexes and their combined sum of lengths is maximal.

So far I have tried "greedy" algorithms in the line of:

  1. Use the longest increasing subsequence algorithm, throw that sequence away from the array, repeat N times, provide found sequences as result. This works if N=1 by design, works in several odd cases but returns incorrect results for shuffled arrays such as an array constructed of N increasing subsequences.
  2. Construct a number of sequences, adding each element to the now-longest possible subsequence. Obviously flawed, as it finds "substrings" more often than prolonged sequences.
  3. Construct a number of sequences, adding each element to the sequence that has the largest last element. This works better, at least if an array is known to contain N increasing subsequences, this algorithm correctly returns full array as the result, but it does not work properly in general, as it does not consume N as is.

Any other ideas?

If you want to play with sample data of decent size, here's an array:

103,202,234,260,301,324,356,379,405,412,421,284,137,439,315,150,322,454,185,335,481,208,495,223,358,258,522,267,365,526,
536,374,399,566,580,424,302,602,335,365,618,441,380,455,397,483,510,410,419,622,529,534,633,442,544,568,653,668,474,502,
689,583,607,694,699,530,618,648,654,555,705,723,563,738,672,595,746,697,766,720,624,740,794,798,818,845,859,653,752,758,
783,674,793,805,876,831,892,918,929,689,865,950,874,966,997,716,738,899,759,1023,1032,917,1053,938,944,1080,771,797,
960,1089,980,815,839,850,1110,1011,1115,861,878,1143,901,1025,931,1175,1192,1197,1050,1229,959,988,1058,1008,1038,1088,
1116,1126,1135,1063,1256,1269,1082,1275,1088,1305,1122,1154,1157,1326,1184,1350,1184,1205,1236,1268,1293,1324,1373,1347,
1365,1217,1400,1240,1261,1414,1381,1406,1413,1443,1282,1451,1456,1442,1476,1485,1475,1488,1499,1510,1508,1316,1325,1338,
1540,1536,1353,1556,1558,1588,1363,1587,1617,1382,1625,1402,1609,1415,1633,1642,1655,1671,1689,1697,1439,1712,1458,1732,
1481,1693,1510,1747,1715,1762,1730,1791,1820,1522,1539,1748,1759,1566,1577,1584,1611,1646,1834,1790,1653,1820,1659,1833,
1693,1842,1704,1717,1846,1868,1729,1744,1773,1882,1796,1915,1937,1814,1861,1846,1941,1871,1905,1893,1931,1945,1917,
1960,1979,1941,1960,1980,1933,1962,2014,2046,1975,1988,2008,1988,2040,1995,2062,2000,2009,2025,2083,2058,2067,2083,2103,
2038,2114,2121,2134,2063,2166,2115,2124,2178,2202,2135,2090,2104

This is an array constructed of 3 randomized increasing subsequences with overlapping ranges, each having a length of 100, so processing this array with a proper algorithm with N=3 should return full array, with N=1 the answer should be 123, and for N=2, no less than 222. (True value yet undetermined)

  • Careful with the 1. If you only remove the sequence without splitting it or putting a flag where it was you could come out with wrong answers : 12123454 => remove 12345 in the middle => 124 => you have found 1 sequences of 5 elements and 1 of 3 instead of 1 of 5, 1 of 2, 1 of 1 – Jusanne Aug 4 '15 at 13:32
  • Any specs on the input size? (max N, max array length, perhaps max value in array) – Stef Aug 4 '15 at 13:39
  • If the N sequences are longest increasing subsequences that do not intersect, then definitely the sum of lengths will be maximum. What is the point in mentioning that? – Sumeet Aug 4 '15 at 13:52
  • There's definitely a polynomial-time algorithm that falls out of the min-cost flow machinery. Probably there's a better way to think about it though. – David Eisenstat Aug 4 '15 at 13:54
  • @Jusanne The sequences are not required to be "solid", so the "1 of 5, 1 of 3" is a correct answer here. – Vesper Aug 4 '15 at 13:56

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