3

I've created a package that starts a simple HTTP server for testing purposes, but the stop() method doesn't seem to want to stop the fork()'ed process. Killing the process (via SIGHUP) works fine outside of the object, but calling $server->stop just doesn't work. Why?

package MockHub;
use Moose;
use HTTP::Server::Brick;
use JSON;
use Log::Any qw($log);
use English qw(-no_match_vars);

has 'server' => (
    'is'       => 'ro',
    'lazy'     => 1,
    'isa'      => 'HTTP::Server::Brick',
    'builder'  => '_build_server',
    'init_arg' => undef
);
has 'port'  => ( 'is' => 'ro', 'isa' => 'Int' );
has 'pid'   => ( 'is' => 'rw', 'isa' => 'Int', 'init_arg' => undef );
has 'token' => ( 'is' => 'rw', 'isa' => 'Str', 'init_arg' => undef );
has 'log'   => ( 'is' => 'ro', 'isa' => 'Log::Any::Proxy', 'default' => sub { Log::Any->get_logger() } );

sub start {
    my $self = shift;        

    my $pid = fork;

    # Spawn the server in a child process.
    if (!defined $pid) {
        die qq{Can't fork: $!};
    }
    elsif ($pid == 0) { # child 
        $self->server->start;
        exit; # exit after server exits
    }
    else { # parent 
        $self->pid($pid);
        return $pid;
    }
}

sub _build_server {
    my ($self) = @_;

    my $port   = $self->port;
    my $pid    = $self->pid || 'NO PID';
    my $server = HTTP::Server::Brick->new( port => $port );
    $server->mount(
        '/foo' => {
            'handler' => sub {
                my ( $req, $res ) = @_;
                my $token = substr( $req->{'path_info'}, 1 );    # remove leading slash
                $self->token($token);
                $res->header( 'Content-Type' => 'application/json' );
                $res->add_content( encode_json( { 'success' => 1, 'message' => 'Process Report Received' } ) );
                1;
            },
            'wildcard' => 1,
        },
    );
    $server->mount(
        '/token' => {
            'handler' => sub {
                my ( $req, $res ) = @_;
                my $token = $self->token || '';
                $res->header( 'Content-Type' => 'text/plain' );
                $res->add_content($token);
                1;
            },
        },
    );

    return $server;
}

sub stop {
    my ($self) = @_;

    my $pid = $self->pid || die q{No PID};

    if (kill 0, $pid) {
        sleep 1;
        kill 'HUP', $pid;
        if (kill 0, $pid) {
            warn q{Server will not die!};
        }
    }
    else {
        warn q{Server not running};
    }
}
__PACKAGE__->meta->make_immutable;
  • 2
    kill 0, $pid merely tells returns whether you can send a signal to process with PID $pid, so it useless to do right before kill 'HUP', $pid. In other words, if (kill 0, $pid) { kill 'HUP', $pid; ... } is a weird way of writing if (kill 'HUP', $pid) { ... } – ikegami Aug 4 '15 at 18:20
2

Although it's not running, the process still exists until its parent reaps it reaped by wait(2). Since the child is never reaped (and since there's no permission issue), kill 0, $pid will always succeed. Fixed:

sub stop {
    my ($self) = @_;

    my $pid = $self->pid
        or die("No child to stop.\n");

    kill(TERM => $pid);
        or die("Can't kill child.\n");

    if (!eval {{
        local $SIG{ALRM} = sub { die "timeout\n" };
        alarm(15);
        waitpid($pid, 0) > 0
            or die("Can't reap child.\n");

        return 1;  # No exception
    }}) {
        die($@) if $@ ne "timeout\n";

        warn("Forcing child to end.\n");
        kill(KILL => $pid)
            or die("Can't kill child.\n");

        waitpid($pid, 0) > 0
            or die("Can't reap child.\n");
    }

    $self->pid(0);
}
  • That did fix my problem. What was I doing wrong? Not calling waitpid()? – Kit Peters Aug 5 '15 at 17:37
  • Oh right, I see why that fixes it. Edited my answer. – ikegami Aug 5 '15 at 17:41
2

Your stop subroutine does not appear to stop anything. It sends kill 0 (which merely detects when the process is running), or a HUP. Don't you want to send SIGTERM or similar?

Also, what are you trying to achieve with $self->$pid? When you do the fork(), then the memory space of parent and child are separated, so what you write into $self->pid in the parent will not be visible to the child. You thus need to record the PID of the child in the child, e.g.

$self->pid = $$;

before

$self->server->start;

I'm a little unsure exactly which process you are trying to kill here, and which process is calling stop(). I'm presuming these aren't exactly the same or you'd surely just have quit from there rather than muck around with kill etc.

  • The detault action for SIGHUP is the same as SIGTERM. SIGTERM is more appropriate, but SIGHUP should work just as well. – ikegami Aug 4 '15 at 18:18
  • @ikegami I agree, though I got the distinct impression we hadn't seen all the source. – abligh Aug 4 '15 at 18:23
  • The idea behind $self->pid() was to store the child PID in the parent process so that stop() could terminate the child process. – Kit Peters Aug 5 '15 at 17:29
  • And I used SIGHUP because that was the signal HTTP::Server::Brick (which this class uses) wanted to terminate the server. – Kit Peters Aug 5 '15 at 17:54
  • You cannot from a child alter the memory space of the parent (or vice versa) – abligh Aug 5 '15 at 22:28

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