5

I have the following Problem: I have a Listview, where each item is a custom Control ("DisruptionIcon"), that shows an Icon, depending on the properties that are set for the custom Control. The Icon can have one shape out of many (here in the example just "None" and "Square"). The Problem is now, if I scroll down in the ListView and after that back up, the Icons are wrong. This results in this:

Before scroll down:

Before Scrolling down

After scroll down and up:

enter image description here

The resources are:

MainPage.xaml:

<Page
x:Class="App1.MainPage"
xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
xmlns:local="using:App1"
xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008"
xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006"
mc:Ignorable="d"
Name="MainPg"
>

<Grid Background="{ThemeResource ApplicationPageBackgroundThemeBrush}">
    <ListView
        Width="200"
        ItemsSource="{Binding LineList, ElementName=MainPg}"
        >
        <ListView.ItemTemplate>
            <DataTemplate>
                <Grid>
                    <local:DisruptionIcon 
                        DisplayName="{Binding DisplayName}"
                        IconType="{Binding DisplayStyle}"
                        Color1="{Binding Color1}"
                        Color2="{Binding Color2}"
                        />
                    <TextBlock Text="{Binding DisplayName}" Foreground="Red"/>
                </Grid>
            </DataTemplate>
        </ListView.ItemTemplate>
    </ListView>
</Grid>

MainPage.xaml.cs:

public sealed partial class MainPage : Page
{
    public MainPage()
    {
        LineList = new ObservableCollection<ServerLineDefinition>();

        for (byte i = 0; i <= 250; i++)
        {
            var ds = new ServerLineDefinition("ID " + i, "FFFFFF", "000000", 1, i);

            LineList.Add(ds);
        }

        InitializeComponent();
    }

    public ObservableCollection<ServerLineDefinition> LineList { get; set; }
}

My custom Control is this: DisruptionIcon.xaml:

<UserControl
x:Class="App1.DisruptionIcon"
xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
xmlns:local="using:App1"
xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008"
xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006"
Name="mainUc" mc:Ignorable="d"
d:DesignHeight="34" d:DesignWidth="80"
Width="80" Height="34"
>    
<Grid>
    <local:DisplayIconTemplateSelector Content="{Binding IconType, ElementName=mainUc}">
        <local:DisplayIconTemplateSelector.StyleNone>
            <DataTemplate>
                <Grid/>
            </DataTemplate>
        </local:DisplayIconTemplateSelector.StyleNone>
        <local:DisplayIconTemplateSelector.StyleSquare>
            <DataTemplate>
                <Rectangle 
                    Width="80" 
                    Height="32" 
                    Fill="{Binding Color2, ElementName=mainUc}"
                    VerticalAlignment="Top"
                    HorizontalAlignment="Left"
                    StrokeThickness="2" 
                    Stroke="{Binding Color1, ElementName=mainUc}"
                    />
            </DataTemplate>
        </local:DisplayIconTemplateSelector.StyleSquare>
    </local:DisplayIconTemplateSelector>

    <Viewbox 
        Stretch="Uniform" 
        HorizontalAlignment="Stretch"
        VerticalAlignment="Stretch"
        Margin="8,0"
        >            
        <TextBlock 
            Text="{Binding DisplayName, ElementName=mainUc}"
            Foreground="{Binding Color1, ElementName=mainUc}" 
            Height="auto"
            VerticalAlignment="Top"
            TextWrapping="NoWrap"
            FontWeight="Bold"
            TextAlignment="Center"
            Margin="0,-2,0,0"
            />
    </Viewbox>
</Grid>

This is the Code behind for the DisruptionIcon in disruptionicon.xaml.cs where basically the Properties are just binded by DependencyProperties and the Colors will be converted to SolidColorBrush if they are provided as a string. This is a thing I need because of the application-design:

public sealed partial class DisruptionIcon
{
    public DisruptionIcon()
    {
        Color1 = new SolidColorBrush(Colors.White);
        Color2 = new SolidColorBrush(Colors.Black);
        IconType = DisplayStyle.None;
        DisplayName = "";
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    #region Color1
    /// <summary>
    /// Used for the View of multiple Icons. Contains an IconId and the text to show for every Entry
    /// </summary>
    public object Color1
    {
        get { return (object)GetValue(DisruptionColor1Property); }
        set { SetValue(DisruptionColor1Property, value); }
    }

    // Using a DependencyProperty as the backing store for ItemSource.  This enables animation, styling, binding, etc...
    public static readonly DependencyProperty DisruptionColor1Property =
        DependencyProperty.Register("Color1", typeof(object), typeof(DisruptionIcon), new PropertyMetadata(null, DisruptionColor1PropertyCallback));

    public static void DisruptionColor1PropertyCallback(DependencyObject dp, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs args)
    {
        var iconColor1 = ((DisruptionIcon)dp).Color1;

        if (iconColor1 == null || iconColor1 is SolidColorBrush)
            return;

        //Convert Colors
        if (iconColor1 is string)
            iconColor1 = ConvertToSolidColorBrush((string)iconColor1);

        ((DisruptionIcon)dp).Color1 = iconColor1;
    }
    #endregion

    #region Color2
    /// <summary>
    /// Used for the View of multiple Icons. Contains an IconId and the text to show for every Entry
    /// </summary>
    public object Color2
    {
        get { return (object)GetValue(DisruptionColor2Property); }
        set { SetValue(DisruptionColor2Property, value); }
    }

    // Using a DependencyProperty as the backing store for ItemSource.  This enables animation, styling, binding, etc...
    public static readonly DependencyProperty DisruptionColor2Property =
        DependencyProperty.Register("Color2", typeof(object), typeof(DisruptionIcon), new PropertyMetadata(null, DisruptionColor2PropertyCallback));

    public static void DisruptionColor2PropertyCallback(DependencyObject dp, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs args)
    {
        var iconColor2 = ((DisruptionIcon)dp).Color2;

        if (iconColor2 == null || iconColor2 is SolidColorBrush)
            return;

        //Convert Colors
        if (iconColor2 is string)
            iconColor2 = ConvertToSolidColorBrush((string)iconColor2);

        ((DisruptionIcon)dp).Color2 = iconColor2;
    }
    #endregion

    #region IconType
    /// <summary>
    /// Used for the View of multiple Icons. Contains an IconId and the text to show for every Entry
    /// </summary>
    public object IconType
    {
        get { return (DisplayStyle)GetValue(DisruptionDisplayStyleProperty); }
        set { SetValue(DisruptionDisplayStyleProperty, value); }
    }

    // Using a DependencyProperty as the backing store for ItemSource.  This enables animation, styling, binding, etc...
    public static readonly DependencyProperty DisruptionDisplayStyleProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register("IconType", typeof(object), typeof(DisruptionIcon), new PropertyMetadata(DisplayStyle.None, DisruptionDisplayStylePropertyCallback));

    public static void DisruptionDisplayStylePropertyCallback(DependencyObject dp, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs args)
    {
        var iconDisplayStyle = ((DisruptionIcon)dp).IconType;

        if (args.NewValue is Int32)
        {
            ((DisruptionIcon)dp).IconType = (DisplayStyle)args.NewValue;
        }


    }

    #endregion

    #region DisplayName
    /// <summary>
    /// Used for the View of multiple Icons. Contains an IconId and the text to show for every Entry
    /// </summary>
    public string DisplayName
    {
        get { return (string)GetValue(DisruptionDisplayNameProperty); }
        set { SetValue(DisruptionDisplayNameProperty, value); }
    }

    // Using a DependencyProperty as the backing store for ItemSource.  This enables animation, styling, binding, etc...
    public static readonly DependencyProperty DisruptionDisplayNameProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register("DisplayName", typeof(string), typeof(DisruptionIcon), new PropertyMetadata(null, DisruptionDisplayNamePropertyCallback));

    public static void DisruptionDisplayNamePropertyCallback(DependencyObject dp, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs args)
    {
        var iconDisplayName = ((DisruptionIcon)dp).DisplayName;

        if (iconDisplayName == null)
            return;

        ((DisruptionIcon)dp).DisplayName = iconDisplayName;
    }
    #endregion


    /// <summary>
    /// Converts a ColorCode (i.e. FF8899) to SolidColorBrush
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="colorCode">Six-Digit Hex-Code of the Color</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    private static SolidColorBrush ConvertToSolidColorBrush(string colorCode)
    {
        if (colorCode != null && colorCode.Length == 6)
        {
            return new SolidColorBrush(Color.FromArgb(255,
                Convert.ToByte(colorCode.Substring(0, 2), 16),
                Convert.ToByte(colorCode.Substring(2, 2), 16),
                Convert.ToByte(colorCode.Substring(4), 16)));
        }

        return new SolidColorBrush(Colors.Black);

    }
}

My TemplateSelector DisplayIconTemplateSelector.cs:

public class DisplayIconTemplateSelector : ContentControl
{
    protected override void OnContentChanged(object oldContent, object newContent)
    {
        base.OnContentChanged(oldContent, newContent);

        ContentTemplate = SelectTemplate(newContent, this);
    }

    public DataTemplate StyleNone { get; set; }
    public DataTemplate StyleSquare { get; set; }

    public DataTemplate SelectTemplate(object item, DependencyObject container)
    {
        var quoteItem = (DisplayStyle)item;

        switch (quoteItem)
        {
            default:
                return StyleNone;
            case DisplayStyle.Square:
                return StyleSquare;
        }
    }
}

And Finally my ServerLineDefinition-Class:

public class ServerLineDefinition : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public ServerLineDefinition() { }

    public ServerLineDefinition(
        string displayName,
        string backgroundColor,
        string foregroundColor,
        int displayStyle,
        int id)
    {
        DisplayName = displayName;
        Color2 = backgroundColor;
        Color1 = foregroundColor;
        DisplayStyle = displayStyle;
        Id = id;
    }

    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string DisplayName { get; set; }
    public int DisplayStyle { get; set; }


    /// <summary>
    /// RGB-Value for BackgroundColor
    /// </summary>
    public string Color2 { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// RGB-Value for ForegroundColor
    /// </summary>
    public string Color1 { get; set; }


    #region PropertyChanged

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged; //To Update Content on the Form

    /// <summary>
    /// Helper for Triggering PropertyChanged
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="triggerControl">The Name of the Property to update</param>
    private void RaisePropertyChanged(string triggerControl)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
        {
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(triggerControl));
        }
    }

    #endregion
}

For me it seems like, that there is a Problem with the caching of the ListView. If I replace the ListView with an ItemsControl wraped in a ScrollViewer, the Problem does not exists, but is uses much more Memory and needs more time to load. Additionally if you uncomment the TextBlock, that is added as a comment in the MainPage.xaml, you see in every line the correct ID, but the wrong Image as shown in the screenhots.

Edit: If I place any Control in a ScrollViewer, then it is slow, but works. It also works, if I put the whole Code of the DisruptionIcon.xaml directly to the place in the MainPage, where the DirutpionIcon is referenced.

2
  • I tested around some other application-designs and figured out, that the problem not exists, if I implement the custom control directly to the MainPage.xaml. What can be the reason for this?
    – Hunv
    Commented Aug 7, 2015 at 14:31
  • In WPF programs I am writing. I prefer to use MVVM model. I my View , the constructor first job is to call InitializeComponent() - After this, I set DataContext to my View Model. In my View Model, I have ObservableCollection that I fill with data I want to display. Perhaps InitializeComponent() has to be the first call to setup all UI elements from XAML ?
    – rdyhalt
    Commented Aug 14, 2015 at 18:05

1 Answer 1

0

Try with this Style Setters for the ItemsControl, keyword "Virtualization":

    <Setter Property="ItemsPanel">
        <Setter.Value>
            <ItemsPanelTemplate>
                <ItemsStackPanel Orientation="Vertical"/>
            </ItemsPanelTemplate>
        </Setter.Value>
    </Setter>
    <Setter Property="Template">
        <Setter.Value>
            <ControlTemplate TargetType="ItemsControl">
                <Border x:Name="LayoutRoot">
                    <ScrollViewer>
                        <ItemsPresenter/>
                    </ScrollViewer>
                </Border>
            </ControlTemplate>
        </Setter.Value>
    </Setter>

And on your DependencyProperty for your DisplayName, update to this:

public static void DisruptionDisplayNamePropertyCallback(DependencyObject dp, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs args)
{
    var iconDisplayName = (string)e.NewValue;
    ((DisruptionIcon)dp).DisplayName = iconDisplayName;
}

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