I just started python a few days ago and have been working on a calculator (not extremely basic, but also not advanced). The problem doesn't prevent code from running or anything, it is just a visual thing. Output in the console looks like this (stuff in parenthesis is explaining what is happening and is not actually part of the output):

4 (user prompted for first number, press enter afterwards)
+ (user prompted for an operator, press enter afterwards
5 (user prompted for second number, press enter afterwards)
9.00000 (answer is printed)

Process finished with exit code 0

Basically what I want it to look like is this when I'm entering it into the console:

4+5
9.00000

I don't want it to start a newline after I enter a number or operator or whatever, it looks more like an actual calculator when it prints along one line. Is this possible to do and if so how? Btw I know end="" works with print but not with input since it doesn't accept arguments. Also I know the whole calculator thing is kind of redundant considering you can make calculations really easily in the python IDLE but I thought it was a good way for me to learn. Here is the entire code if you need it:

import math

while True:
    try:
        firstNumber = float(input())
        break
    except ValueError:
        print("Please enter a number...   ", end="")
while True:
    operators = ['+', '-', '*', '/', '!', '^']
    userOperator = str(input())
    if userOperator in operators:
        break
    else:
        print("Enter a valid operator...   ", end="")
if userOperator == operators[4]:
    answer = math.factorial(firstNumber)
    print(answer)
    pause = input()
    raise SystemExit
while True:
    try:
        secondNumber = float(input())
        break
    except ValueError:
        print("Please enter a number...   ", end="")
if userOperator == operators[0]:
        answer = firstNumber + secondNumber
        print('%.5f' % round(answer, 5))
elif userOperator == operators[1]:
        answer = firstNumber - secondNumber
        print('%.5f' % round(answer, 5))
elif userOperator == operators[2]:
        answer = firstNumber * secondNumber
        print('%.5f' % round(answer, 5))
elif userOperator == operators[3]:
        answer = firstNumber / secondNumber
        print('%.5f' % round(answer, 5))
elif userOperator == operators[5]:
        answer = firstNumber ** secondNumber
        print('%.5f' % round(answer, 5))
pause = input()
raise SystemExit
  • Hitting Enter is going to make a newline; why not use Space as your separator, then split the string into its parts and go from there. E.g. you enter 4 + 5<Enter>. – Cyphase Aug 5 '15 at 4:13
  • 1
    No need for space either, simply ask the user to enter the whole thing, e.g. 4+5 and then handle the whole expression at once by parsing it and calculating the result. – alfasin Aug 5 '15 at 4:16
  • @alfasin, sure, but that's a bit more advanced than just splitting on ' '. – Cyphase Aug 5 '15 at 4:21
  • @Cyphase actually, first thing I would do would be to remove all spaces :) – alfasin Aug 5 '15 at 4:22
  • @alfasin Sorry if this is really easy, but I'm really new to Python and it's my first programming language.... but how would I go about interpreting the whole thing at once? With the two numbers being ints (or floats) and the + or - or whatever the user inputs being a string? Also how would I check a specific part of the input to see if matched a valid operator? – modernwar24 Aug 5 '15 at 4:23

Your problem is that you're asking for input() without specifying what you want. So if you take a look at the first one: firstNumber = float(input()) It's executing properly, but you hit enter it gives an error which is only then you're specifying what you want.

Try replacing with these:

...
try
    firstNumber = float(input("Please enter a number...   "))
...
    userOperator = str(input("Enter a valid operator...   "))
...
    secondNumber = float(input("Please enter a number...   "))

Is that what you're looking for?

Using my method I suggested:

Please enter a number...   5
Enter a valid operator...   +
Please enter a number...   6
11.00000

Using your method:

Please enter a number...   5

Enter a valid operator...   +

Please enter a number...   6
11.00000

Extra newlines which is what I'm assuming you're referring to.

  • I think you misunderstood the question. – Cyphase Aug 5 '15 at 4:22
  • I may have, I'll wait for a comment then revise if needed. – Leb Aug 5 '15 at 4:22
  • No, using the first while loop as an example: user input is converted to a float and stored in the variable firstNumber. The text strings are only used if the value the user entered returned an error, indicating they didn't enter the correct type of input. – modernwar24 Aug 5 '15 at 4:26

That's a nice exercise, and as I wrote in the comments, I would ignore whitespaces, take the expression as a whole from the user and then parse it and calculate the result. Here's a small demo:

def is_number(s):
    try:
        float(s)
        return True
    except ValueError:
        return False


def calc(expr):
    if is_number(expr):
        return float(expr)    
    arr = expr.split('+')
    if len(arr) > 1:
        return sum(map(calc, arr))
    arr = expr.split('-')
    if len(arr) > 1:
        return reduce(lambda x,y: x-y, map(calc, arr))
    arr = expr.split('*')
    if len(arr) > 1:
        return reduce(lambda x,y: x*y, map(calc, arr), 1)
    arr = expr.split('/')
    if len(arr) > 1:
        return reduce(lambda x,y: x/y, map(calc, arr))


print calc("3+4-2 *2/ 2")    # 5
  • Thanks! Although I can't quite figure out what the reduce() function does... but I guess that's the whole process of learning. – modernwar24 Aug 5 '15 at 17:35
  • @modernwar24 there are good explanations on what is reduce and how it's working here and here – alfasin Aug 5 '15 at 17:49

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.