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I'm currently working on a friends project with a lot of classes, written by different people. While reading the code I realized these people have a different style in throwing exceptions in special situations.

Just say "developer 1" did:

public string this[int index]
{
     get
     {
          if (index >= 0 && index < contents.Length)
              return contents[index];
          else
              throw new IndexOutOfRangeException();
      }
 }

He checks for the index and throws an exception if the index is out of range.

"Developer 2" instead did:

public string this[int index]
{
     get
     {
          return contents[index];
     }
 }

He dont check for the index and let the CLR throw - as well - an IndexOutOfRangeException if the index is out of range.

Sure, both ways give the same result, but are there any differences in performance or something? Also is there a recommendation which to use when? I would prefer the first way, because it's easier to maintain..

  • The stack is going to be different in the exception. The "handled" one will have the stack stop at the throw site, where the "unhandled" one will show information about the collection you are accessing. It also depends on what the backing collection is, for an array, it will throw an IndexOutOfBoundsException, but if you are accessing a Dictionary, you'll get a KeyNotFoundException. – Ron Beyer Aug 5 '15 at 15:18
  • this might be better asked on programmers.stackexchange.com as it isn't a specific problem but more about code design. – user1666620 Aug 5 '15 at 15:37
  • 1
    @user1666620 If this were migrated to programmers, it would be closed as a duplicate of this question – durron597 Aug 5 '15 at 15:39
  • @durron597 absolutely, and rightly so. either way it's a bad question here. – user1666620 Aug 5 '15 at 15:45
3

In my opinion the first way is just unneccesary code, I don't see here any maintaince gain. Such way would be usefull if we wan't to throw our own exception with some additional details. But doing the same check which the CLR does to throw the same exception - no sense at all.

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Performance-wise, the backing array will already have checks run on the index range, so if you do it yourself with no intention to provide extra details in your thrown exception, you're just duplicating work which will affect performance in some probably unnoticeable way. You could set up a console app to compare performance using a Stopwatch and run each style a few million times and compare times.

The potential utility of doing your own check and throwing yourself would be if the backing enumerable type isn't guaranteed to always be the same. As Ron pointed out, a Dictionary would throw something different, so if the caller had a catch just for IndexOutOfRangeException, but in this instance maybe your indexer happened to be holding a Dictionary, you wouldn't handle the exception if you didn't "normalize" it by throwing it yourself.