46

Given two boolean, how to come up with the most elegant one liner that computes the XOR operation in C#?

I know one can do this by a combination of switch or if else but that would make my code rather ugly.

71
bool xorValue = bool1 ^ bool2;
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    I guess that there is no ^^ operator since short-circuiting XOR is not possible, since you have to evaluate both values in all cases. – Dave Cousineau May 14 '13 at 6:23
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    I personally think that bool ElegantResult = ElegantBoolean1 ^ ElegantBoolean2; is a little more elegant... but I guess it's really in the eye of the beholder – Code Jockey Nov 6 '14 at 13:12
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    It works because in C#, true = 1 and false = 0. If you're used to C/C++ and long Booleans, where there was 0 and non-0, a bit-wise OR triggers warning bells in your head. But that's not the case in C#. (Note that conversions to Boolean are still 0 and non-0, but that's not how they're stored.) See docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/… – FreeText Apr 23 '18 at 14:32
64

Ok to add some context: You can look here Tables

There you can see that "exclusive or" is basically the same as "not equal". So you could just use this (with boolean):

if (X != Y)...

But if you want to directly show people you mean "XOR" just use the other answers here.

  • 1
    I loved this solution. Should be up. – aod Aug 24 '16 at 6:49
  • I'd say this is a lot more readable than the XOR operator option, since many developers could not know the XOR operator and misinterpret the code – almulo Jul 10 '18 at 17:29
18

C# has logical XOR operator ^. Here's how you do it.

bool result = x ^ y // x XOR y
  • To be explicit, ^ is a bit-wise OR, it just happens to work as a logical OR because the bits of Boolean values are all 0's (=false) or all 0's and a lone 1 bit (=true). – FreeText Apr 23 '18 at 14:35
0

I think it should help:

A ^ B ? TrueOperation() : FalseOperation();

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