6

Let's say I have an array

arr1 = ["a", "b", "c"]

and I want to zip an array of arrays to it

arr2 = [[1, "foo"], [2, "bar"], [3, "baz"]]

so that the end result is

[["a", 1, "foo"], ["b", 2, "bar"], ["c", 3, "baz"]]

Right now what I'm doing is arr1.zip(arr2).map!(&:flatten), but I'm wondering if there's a better way to do this?

  • First thing that comes to mind is an each_index iteration, then inject the element from arr1 into the element of arr2. If you find this helpful, I will post, but it seems longer than what you have now – onebree Aug 5 '15 at 20:06
  • I don't see what's wrong with the way you're doing it, but an alternative might be arr2.each_with_index{|a,i| a.unshift(arr1[i])} ... but really, yours is nicer. – SteveTurczyn Aug 5 '15 at 20:15
12

Another way is:

arr1.zip(*arr2.transpose)
# => [["a", 1, "foo"], ["b", 2, "bar"], ["c", 3, "baz"]]
  • That's a clever use of transpose. – aaron-coding Aug 5 '15 at 20:16
  • 1
    This wouldn't work if arr2 contains arrays with different sizes, isn't symmetric, doesn't work if both contain arrays of arrays and OP's solution is still clearer, but I have to admit that this is pretty clever. – ndnenkov Aug 5 '15 at 20:21
  • Nice one, D, but @ndn has a point.. – Cary Swoveland Aug 5 '15 at 20:44
3

Here are two other (closely-related) ways:

enum = arr1.to_enum
arr2.map { |a| [enum.next].concat(a) }
  #=> [["a", 1, "foo"], ["b", 2, "bar"], ["c", 3, "baz"]] 

or

arr1_cpy = arr1.dup
arr2.map { |a| [arr1_cpy.shift].concat(a) }
  #=> [["a", 1, "foo"], ["b", 2, "bar"], ["c", 3, "baz"]] 
1
arr2.each_with_index{ |el,i| el.unshift(arr1[i]) }

Maybe you like that better?

  • 1
    If you're doing an unshift you're mutating the object, so you don't really need the map! bit. The original array will change regardless. – SteveTurczyn Aug 5 '15 at 20:20
  • @SteveTurczyn good point, updated. Although Doguita's answer is way better. – aaron-coding Aug 5 '15 at 20:23
1

If you need the content of arr2 to be before the content of arr1, you cannot use the #transpose trick. However, you can:

arr1.map.with_index { |el, i| [*arr2[i], el] }
# => [[1, "foo", "a"], [2, "bar", "b"], [3, "baz", "c"]]

Which has the perks of:

  1. not mutating original arrays
  2. let you choose the order

In terms of performance, Doguita's answer seems better:

arr1 = %w(foo) * 10_000
arr2 = arr1.length.times.map { |i| [i, i.to_s(2)] }
Benchmark.bmbm(20) do |x|
  x.report("zip & transpose:") { arr1.zip(*arr2.transpose) }
  x.report("map & with_index:") { arr1.map.with_index { |v, i| [v, *arr2[i]] } }
end
Rehearsal --------------------------------------------------------
zip & transpose:       0.000902   0.000233   0.001135 (  0.001107)
map & with_index:      0.004206   0.002308   0.006514 (  0.006828)
----------------------------------------------- total: 0.007649sec

                           user     system      total        real
zip & transpose:       0.001474   0.000045   0.001519 (  0.001471)
map & with_index:      0.002155   0.000059   0.002214 (  0.002282)
  • It's really more readable! but which one is more performant? – Hugo Barthelemy Aug 9 at 15:04
  • I've edited my answer :) – Ulysse BN Aug 9 at 15:11

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.