71

Does JavaScript support substitution/interpolation?

Overview


I'm working on a JavaScript project, and as it's getting bigger, keeping strings in good shape is getting a lot harder. I'm wondering what's the easiest and most conventional way to construct or build strings in JavaScript.

My experience so far:

String concatenation starts looking ugly and becomes harder to maintain as the project becomes more complex.

The most important this at this point is succinctness and readability, think a bunch of moving parts, not just 2-3 variables.

It's also important that it's supported by major browsers as of today (i.e., at least ES5 supported).

I'm aware of the JavaScript concatenation shorthand:

var x = 'Hello';
var y = 'world';
console.log(x + ', ' + y);

And of the String.concat function.

I'm looking for something a bit neater.

Ruby and Swift do it in an interesting way.

Ruby

var x = 'Hello'
var y = 'world'
print "#{x}, #{y}"

Swift

var x = "Hello"
var y = "world"
println("\(x), \(y)")

I was thinking that there might be something like that in JavaScript maybe something similar to sprintf.js.

Question


Can this be done without a third-party library? If not, what can I use?

0

6 Answers 6

102

With ES6, you can use

ES5 and below:

  • use the + operator

    var username = 'craig';
    var joined = 'hello ' + username;
    
  • String's concat(..)

    var username = 'craig';
    var joined = 'hello '.concat(username);
    

Alternatively, use Array methods:

  • join(..):

    var username = 'craig';
    var joined = ['hello', username].join(' ');
    
  • Or even fancier, reduce(..) combined with any of the above:

    var a = ['hello', 'world', 'and', 'the', 'milky', 'way'];
    var b = a.reduce(function(pre, next) {
      return pre + ' ' + next;
    });
    console.log(b); // hello world and the milky way
    
2
27

I'm disappointed that nobody in the other answers interpreted "best way" as "fastest way"...

I pulled the 2 examples from here and added str.join() and str.reduce() from nishanths's answer above. Here are my results on Firefox 77.0.1 on Linux.


Note: I discovered while testing these that if I place str = str.concat() and str += directly before or after each other, the second one always performs a fair bit better... So I ran these tests individually and commented the others out for the results...

Even still, they varied widely in speed if I reran them, so I measured 3 times for each.

1 character at a time:

  • str = str.concat(): 841, 439, 956 ms / 1e7 concat()'s
  • ............str +=: 949, 1130, 664 ms / 1e7 +='s
  • .........[].join(): 3350, 2911, 3522 ms / 1e7 characters in []
  • .......[].reduce(): 3954, 4228, 4547 ms / 1e7 characters in []

26 character string at a time:

  • str = str.concat(): 444, 744, 479 ms / 1e7 concat()'s
  • ............str +=: 1037, 473, 875 ms / 1e7 +='s
  • .........[].join(): 2693, 3394, 3457 ms / 1e7 strings in []
  • .......[].reduce(): 2782, 2770, 4520 ms / 1e7 strings in []

So, regardless of whether appending 1 character at a time or a string of 26 at a time:

  • Clear winner: basically a tie between str = str.concat() and str +=
  • Clear loser: [].reduce(), followed by [].join()

My code, easy to run in a browser console:

{
  console.clear();

  let concatMe = 'a';
  //let concatMe = 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz';

  //[].join()
  {
    s = performance.now();
    let str = '', sArr = [];
    for (let i = 1e7; i > 0; --i) {
      sArr[i] = concatMe;
    }
    str = sArr.join('');
    e = performance.now();
    console.log(e - s);
    console.log('[].join(): ' + str);
  }

  //str +=
  {
    s = performance.now();
    let str = '';
    for (let i = 1e7; i > 0; --i) {
      str += concatMe;
    }
    e = performance.now();
    console.log(e - s);
    console.log('str +=: ' + str);
  }

  //[].reduce()
  {
    s = performance.now();
    let str = '', sArr = [];
    for (let i = 1e7; i > 0; --i) {
      sArr[i] = concatMe;
    }
    str = sArr.reduce(function(pre, next) {
      return pre + next;
    });
    e = performance.now();
    console.log(e - s);
    console.log('[].reduce(): ' + str);
  }

  //str = str.concat()
  {
    s = performance.now();
    let str = '';
    for (let i = 1e7; i > 0; --i) {
      str = str.concat(concatMe);
    }
    e = performance.now();
    console.log(e - s);
    console.log('str = str.concat(): ' + str);
  }

  'Done';
}

1
  • 3
    I'm getting similar results. ''.concat(...strings) is consistently outperforming all other methods. I wonder why it is not getting the love it deserves.
    – graup
    Commented Nov 28, 2020 at 9:12
11
var descriptor = 'awesome';
console.log(`ES6 is ${descriptor}!`);

More: https://developers.google.com/web/updates/2015/01/ES6-Template-Strings?hl=en

3
  • I wish this works would have been great!, but it's only supported in chrome at the moment :L Great answer though :)
    – MrHaze
    Commented Aug 6, 2015 at 2:41
  • And Firefox, and Opera. :) Just not IE or Safari.
    – rrowland
    Commented Aug 6, 2015 at 2:43
  • 2
    As of right now (March 2020) ES6 is supported in all major browsers, so you're free to use it except if you need to support old, outdated, terrible browsers (in other words, Internet Explorer) Commented Mar 18, 2020 at 11:30
8

I think replace() deserves mentioning here.

During some conditions, the replace method can serve you well when building strings. Specifically, obviously, when your injecting a dynamic part into an otherwise static string. Example:

var s = 'I am {0} today!';
var result = s.replace('{0}', 'hungry');
// result: 'I am hungry today!'

The placeholder which to replace can obviously be anything. I use "{0}", "{1}" etc out of habit from C#. It just needs to be unique enough not to occur in the string other than where intended.

So, provided we can fiddle with the string parts a bit, OPs example could be solved like this too:

var x = 'Hello {0}';
var y = 'World';
var result = x.replace('{0}', y);
// result: 'Hello World'. -Oh the magic of computing!

Reference for "replace": https://www.w3schools.com/jsreF/jsref_replace.asp

4

You could use the concat function.

var hello = "Hello ";
var world = "world!";
var res = hello.concat(world);
5
  • 6
    If I wanted to build a much longer string say with 6 different moving parts, it wouldn't be readable at all with the concat function.
    – MrHaze
    Commented Aug 6, 2015 at 2:37
  • 1
    If hello didn't have the trailing space, how would you achieve it all in the same line? hello.concat(world.concat(' '));? Or would you still use the shorthand and do hello.concat(' ' + world)? Commented Aug 6, 2015 at 2:37
  • 2
    @MrHaze concat takes a variable number of arguments. So, perhaps, str1.concat.apply(null, [str2, str3, str4]) slightly improves readability? Commented Aug 6, 2015 at 3:20
  • 1
    str1.concat.apply(null, [str2, str3, str4]) <-- how does the performance of this compare to using [...].join('')? Commented Jan 29, 2018 at 16:51
  • 2
    @MikeStoddart im probably way way way late on answering this one, but as the other answer on this post says, [...].join and .reduce are both very slow for string concatination compared to .concat however i would add that the new ES6 way with string interpolation (hello there ${name}) is much much more cleaner and also very performant
    – Luke_
    Commented Feb 18, 2021 at 16:06
4

You could use Coffeescript, it's made to make javascript code more concise.. For string concatenation, you could do something like this:

first_name = "Marty"
full_name = "#{first_name} McFly"
console.log full_name

Maybe you can start here to see what's offered by coffescript..

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